Download a history of boston in 50 artifacts in pdf or read a history of boston in 50 artifacts in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get a history of boston in 50 artifacts in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



A Short History Of Boston

Author: Robert J. Allison
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781889833477
Size: 29.82 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 742
Download and Read
"Until 2004 and the publication of ""A Short History of Boston,"" there was no good short history of the city of Boston, not in print anyway. With economy and style, Dr. Robert Allison brings Boston history alive, from the Puritan theocracy of the seventeenth century to the Big Dig of the twenty-first. His book includes a wealth of illustrations, a lengthy chronology of the key events in four centuries of Boston history, and twenty short profiles of exceptional Bostonians, from founder John Winthrop to heavyweight champion John L. Sullivan, from ""heretic"" Anne Hutchinson to Russian-American author Mary Antin. Says the Provincetown Arts, ""A first-rate short history of the city, lavishly illustrated, lovingly written, and instantly the best book of its kind."" "

The Rough Guide To Boston

Author: Sarah Hull
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1405382473
Size: 52.70 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 983
Download and Read
The Rough Guide to Boston is the ultimate travel guide to this historic city. Seek out Boston's highlights with detailed information on everything from Fenway Park's "Green Monster" to the purple windowpanes of Beacon Hill. Spot the grasshopper weathervane on top of Faneuil Hall. Savour the city's best ice cream and lobster rolls. Walk in the footsteps of revolutionaries. Discover it all with up-to-date descriptions and maps pinpointing Boston's best hotels, eateries, drinking spots and shops. The Rough Guide to Boston also includes two full-colour sections documenting the city's zealous relationship with sports, plus a guide to Yankee cooking and eats. For out-of-city diversions, there is an additional in-depth chapter on the beach region of Cape Cod and the islands. Explore every corner of this engaging city with insider tips and illuminating photographs designed to help make your journey a uniquely memorable one. Make the most of your holiday with The Rough Guide to Boston.

What The Victorians Threw Away

Author: Tom Licence
Publisher: Oxbow Books
ISBN: 178297878X
Size: 37.40 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5612
Download and Read
The people who lived in England before the First World War now inhabit a realm of yellow photographs. Theirs is a world fast fading from ours, yet they do not appear overly distant. Many of us can remember them as being much like ourselves. Nor is it too late for us to encounter them so intimately that we might catch ourselves worrying that we have invaded their privacy. Digging up their refuse is like peeping through the keyhole. How far off are our grandparents in reality when we can sniff the residues of their perfume, cough medicines, and face cream? If we want to know what they bought in the village store, how they stocked the kitchen cupboard, and how they fed, pampered, and cared for themselves there is no better archive than a rubbish tip within which each object reveals a story. A simple glass bottle can reveal what people were drinking, how a great brand emerged, or whether an inventor triumphed with a new design. An old tin tells us about advertising, household chores, or foreign imports, and even a broken plate can introduce us to the children in the Staffordshire potteries, who painted in the colors of a robin, crudely sketched on a cheap cup and saucer. In this highly readable and delightfully illustrated little book Tom Licence reveals how these everyday minutiae, dug from the ground, contribute to the bigger story of how our great grandparents built a throwaway society from the twin foundations of packaging and mass consumption and illustrates how our own throwaway habits were formed.

A City So Grand

Author: Stephen Puleo
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807050458
Size: 69.68 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 6113
Download and Read
Once upon a time, "Boston Town" was an insulated New England township. But the community was destined for greatness. Between 1850 and 1900, Boston underwent a stunning metamorphosis to emerge as one of the world's great metropolises-one that achieved national and international prominence in politics, medicine, education, science, social activism, literature, commerce, and transportation. Long before the frustrations of our modern era, in which the notion of accomplishing great things often appears overwhelming or even impossible, Boston distinguished itself in the last half of the nineteenth century by proving it could tackle and overcome the most arduous of challenges and obstacles with repeated-and often resounding-success, becoming a city of vision and daring. In A City So Grand, Stephen Puleo chronicles this remarkable period in Boston's history, in his trademark page-turning style. Our journey begins with the ferocity of the abolitionist movement of the 1850s and ends with the glorious opening of America's first subway station, in 1897. In between we witness the thirty-five-year engineering and city-planning feat of the Back Bay project, Boston's explosion in size through immigration and annexation, the devastating Great Fire of 1872 and subsequent rebuilding of downtown, and Alexander Graham Bell's first telephone utterance in 1876 from his lab at Exeter Place. These lively stories and many more paint an extraordinary portrait of a half century of progress, leadership, and influence that turned a New England town into a world-class city, giving us the Boston we know today. From the Hardcover edition.

Slavery In The Age Of Reason

Author: Alexandra A. Chan
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 1572335653
Size: 25.88 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 4095
Download and Read
"Using traditional archaeological techniques and analysis, as well as theoretical perspectives and representational styles of post-processualist schools of thought, Slavery in the Age of Reason is an innovative volume that portrays the Royall family and the people they enslaved "from the inside out." It should put to rest any lingering myth that the peculiar institution was any less harsh or complex when found in the North." From the bookjacket.

Stealing History

Author: Roger Atwood
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 9781429901352
Size: 78.35 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 6764
Download and Read
Roger Atwood knows more about the market for ancient objects than almost anyone. He knows where priceless antiquities are buried, who is digging them up, and who is fencing and buying them. In this fascinating book, Atwood takes readers on a journey through Iraq, Peru, Hong Kong, and across America, showing how the worldwide antiquities trade is destroying what's left of the ancient sites before archaeologists can reach them, and thus erasing their historical significance. And it is getting worse. The discovery of the legendary Royal Tombs of Sipan in Peru started an epidemic. Grave robbers scouring the courntryside for tombs--and finding them. Atwood recounts the incredible story of the biggest piece of gold ever found in the Americas, a 2,000-year-old, three-pound masterpiece that cost one looter his life, sent two smugglers to jail, and wrecked lives from Panama to Pennsylvainia. Packed with true stories, this book not only reveals what has been found, but at what cost to both human life and history.

The North End

Author: Alex R. Goldfeld
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1614232857
Size: 53.47 MB
Format: PDF
View: 4432
Download and Read
Before evolving into a thriving "Little Italy," Boston's North End saw a tangled parade of military, religious and cultural change. Home to prominent historical figures such as Paul Revere, this neighborhood also played host to Samuel Adams and the North End Caucus--which masterminded the infamous Boston Tea Party--as well as the city's first African-American church. From the Boston Massacre to Revere's heroic ride, the North End embodies almost four centuries of strife and celebration, international influence and true American spirit. A small but storied stretch of land, the North End remains the oldest neighborhood in one of the country's most historic cities.

Loot

Author: Sharon Waxman
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1429960434
Size: 10.94 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 1525
Download and Read
A journey across four continents to the heart of the conflict over who should own the great works of ancient art Why are the Elgin Marbles in London and not on the Acropolis? Why do there seem to be as many mummies in France as there are in Egypt? Why are so many Etruscan masterworks in America? For the past two centuries, the West has been plundering the treasures of the ancient world to fill its great museums, but in recent years, the countries where ancient civilizations originated have begun to push back, taking museums to court, prosecuting curators, and threatening to force the return of these priceless objects. Where do these treasures rightly belong? Sharon Waxman, a former culture reporter for The New York Times and a longtime foreign correspondent, brings us inside this high-stakes conflict, examining the implications for the preservation of the objects themselves and for how we understand our shared cultural heritage. Her journey takes readers from the great cities of Europe and America to Egypt, Turkey, Greece, and Italy, as these countries face down the Louvre, the Metropolitan Museum, the British Museum, and the J. Paul Getty Museum. She also introduces a cast of determined and implacable characters whose battles may strip these museums of some of their most cherished treasures. For readers who are fascinated by antiquity, who love to frequent museums, and who believe in the value of cultural exchange, Loot opens a new window on an enduring conflict.

Dining Out In Boston

Author: James C. O'Connell
Publisher: University Press of New England
ISBN: 1611689937
Size: 72.89 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 6765
Download and Read
Over the years, Boston has been one of America's leading laboratories of urban culture, including restaurants, and Boston history provides valuable insights into American food ways. James C. O'Connell, in this fascinating look at more than two centuries of culinary trends in Boston restaurants, presents a rich and hitherto unexplored side to the city's past. Dining Out in Boston shows that the city was a pioneer in elaborate hotel dining, oyster houses, French cuisine, student hangouts, ice cream parlors, the twentieth-century revival of traditional New England dishes, and contemporary locavore and trendy foodie culture. In these stories of the most-beloved Boston restaurants of yesterday and today - illustrated with an extensive collection of historic menus, postcards, and photos - O'Connell reveals a unique history sure to whet the intellectual and nostalgic appetite of Bostonians and restaurant-goers the world over.