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What The Victorians Threw Away

Author: Tom Licence
Publisher: Oxbow Books
ISBN: 178297878X
Size: 40.17 MB
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The people who lived in England before the First World War now inhabit a realm of yellow photographs. Theirs is a world fast fading from ours, yet they do not appear overly distant. Many of us can remember them as being much like ourselves. Nor is it too late for us to encounter them so intimately that we might catch ourselves worrying that we have invaded their privacy. Digging up their refuse is like peeping through the keyhole. How far off are our grandparents in reality when we can sniff the residues of their perfume, cough medicines, and face cream? If we want to know what they bought in the village store, how they stocked the kitchen cupboard, and how they fed, pampered, and cared for themselves there is no better archive than a rubbish tip within which each object reveals a story. A simple glass bottle can reveal what people were drinking, how a great brand emerged, or whether an inventor triumphed with a new design. An old tin tells us about advertising, household chores, or foreign imports, and even a broken plate can introduce us to the children in the Staffordshire potteries, who painted in the colors of a robin, crudely sketched on a cheap cup and saucer. In this highly readable and delightfully illustrated little book Tom Licence reveals how these everyday minutiae, dug from the ground, contribute to the bigger story of how our great grandparents built a throwaway society from the twin foundations of packaging and mass consumption and illustrates how our own throwaway habits were formed.

The Rough Guide To Boston

Author: Sarah Hull
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1405382473
Size: 19.17 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The Rough Guide to Boston is the ultimate travel guide to this historic city. Seek out Boston's highlights with detailed information on everything from Fenway Park's "Green Monster" to the purple windowpanes of Beacon Hill. Spot the grasshopper weathervane on top of Faneuil Hall. Savour the city's best ice cream and lobster rolls. Walk in the footsteps of revolutionaries. Discover it all with up-to-date descriptions and maps pinpointing Boston's best hotels, eateries, drinking spots and shops. The Rough Guide to Boston also includes two full-colour sections documenting the city's zealous relationship with sports, plus a guide to Yankee cooking and eats. For out-of-city diversions, there is an additional in-depth chapter on the beach region of Cape Cod and the islands. Explore every corner of this engaging city with insider tips and illuminating photographs designed to help make your journey a uniquely memorable one. Make the most of your holiday with The Rough Guide to Boston.

A City So Grand

Author: Stephen Puleo
Publisher:
ISBN: 080700149X
Size: 68.44 MB
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The book is a history of Boston's emergence as a world-class city. Once upon a time, Boston Town was an insulated New England township. But the community was destined for greatness. Between 1850 and 1900, Boston underwent a stunning metamorphosis to emerge as one of the world's great metropolises, one that achieved national and international prominence in politics, medicine, education, science, social activism, literature, commerce, and transportation. Long before the frustrations of our modern era, in which the notion of accomplishing great things often appears overwhelming or even impossible, Boston distinguished itself in the last half of the nineteenth century by proving it could tackle and overcome the most arduous of challenges and obstacles with repeated and often resounding success, becoming a city of vision and daring. In this book, the author chronicles this remarkable period in Boston's history. The journey begins with the ferocity of the abolitionist movement of the 1850s and ends with the glorious opening of America's first subway station, in 1897. In between we witness the thirty five year engineering and city planning feat of the Back Bay project, Boston's explosion in size through immigration and annexation, the devastating Great Fire of 1872 and subsequent rebuilding of downtown, and Alexander Graham Bell's first telephone utterance in 1876 from his lab at Exeter Place. These stories paint a portrait of a half century of progress, leadership, and influence that turned a New England town into a world class city, giving us the Boston of today.

People Of The Book

Author: Geraldine Brooks
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101158190
Size: 56.43 MB
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View our feature on Geraldine Books’s People of the Book. From the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of March, the journey of a rare illuminated manuscript through centuries of exile and war In 1996, Hanna Heath, an Australian rare-book expert, is offered the job of a lifetime: analysis and conservation of the famed Sarajevo Haggadah, which has been rescued from Serb shelling during the Bosnian war. Priceless and beautiful, the book is one of the earliest Jewish volumes ever to be illuminated with images. When Hanna, a caustic loner with a passion for her work, discovers a series of tiny artifacts in its ancient binding—an insect wing fragment, wine stains, salt crystals, a white hair—she begins to unlock the book’s mysteries. The reader is ushered into an exquisitely detailed and atmospheric past, tracing the book’s journey from its salvation back to its creation. In Bosnia during World War II, a Muslim risks his life to protect it from the Nazis. In the hedonistic salons of fin-de-siècle Vienna, the book becomes a pawn in the struggle against the city’s rising anti-Semitism. In inquisition-era Venice, a Catholic priest saves it from burning. In Barcelona in 1492, the scribe who wrote the text sees his family destroyed by the agonies of enforced exile. And in Seville in 1480, the reason for the Haggadah’s extraordinary illuminations is finally disclosed. Hanna’s investigation unexpectedly plunges her into the intrigues of fine art forgers and ultra-nationalist fanatics. Her experiences will test her belief in herself and the man she has come to love. Inspired by a true story, People of the Book is at once a novel of sweeping historical grandeur and intimate emotional intensity, an ambitious, electrifying work by an acclaimed and beloved author. From the Hardcover edition.

Slavery In The Age Of Reason

Author: Alexandra A. Chan
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 1572335653
Size: 16.43 MB
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"Using traditional archaeological techniques and analysis, as well as theoretical perspectives and representational styles of post-processualist schools of thought, Slavery in the Age of Reason is an innovative volume that portrays the Royall family and the people they enslaved "from the inside out." It should put to rest any lingering myth that the peculiar institution was any less harsh or complex when found in the North." From the bookjacket.

The North End

Author: Alex R. Goldfeld
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1614232857
Size: 41.97 MB
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Before evolving into a thriving "Little Italy," Boston's North End saw a tangled parade of military, religious and cultural change. Home to prominent historical figures such as Paul Revere, this neighborhood also played host to Samuel Adams and the North End Caucus--which masterminded the infamous Boston Tea Party--as well as the city's first African-American church. From the Boston Massacre to Revere's heroic ride, the North End embodies almost four centuries of strife and celebration, international influence and true American spirit. A small but storied stretch of land, the North End remains the oldest neighborhood in one of the country's most historic cities.

Dining Out In Boston

Author: James C. O'Connell
Publisher: University Press of New England
ISBN: 1611689937
Size: 40.33 MB
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Over the years, Boston has been one of America's leading laboratories of urban culture, including restaurants, and Boston history provides valuable insights into American food ways. James C. O'Connell, in this fascinating look at more than two centuries of culinary trends in Boston restaurants, presents a rich and hitherto unexplored side to the city's past. Dining Out in Boston shows that the city was a pioneer in elaborate hotel dining, oyster houses, French cuisine, student hangouts, ice cream parlors, the twentieth-century revival of traditional New England dishes, and contemporary locavore and trendy foodie culture. In these stories of the most-beloved Boston restaurants of yesterday and today - illustrated with an extensive collection of historic menus, postcards, and photos - O'Connell reveals a unique history sure to whet the intellectual and nostalgic appetite of Bostonians and restaurant-goers the world over.

Boston Boy

Author: Nat Hentoff
Publisher: Paul Dry Books
ISBN: 158988258X
Size: 19.56 MB
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Boston Boy is Nat Hentoff's memoir of growing up in the Roxbury section of Boston in the 1930s and 1940s. He grapples with Judaism and anti-Semitism. He develops a passion for outspoken journalism and First Amendment freedom of speech. And he discovers his love of jazz music as he follows, and is befriended by, the great jazz musicians of the day, including Duke Ellington and Lester Young. "Nat Hentoff knows jazz. And it comes alive in this wonderful, touching memoir." —Ken Burns, creator of the PBS series "Jazz" "This memoir of [Hentoff's] youth should be appreciated not only by adults who grew up through the fires of their own youthful rebellion, but by those restless young people who are now bringing their own views and questions to the world they are inheriting. They could learn from this example that rebels can be gentle as well as enraged and compassionate in their commitment." —New York Times Book Review "[A] charmingly bittersweet memoir." —Boston Globe "This is a touching book about a painful, wonderful time in Boston…I loved it." —Anthony Lewis "[A] richly textured, vivid memoir of growing up in Boston's Roxbury neighborhood…It weaves a colorful and varied tapestry." —Senator Paul Wellstone

Enduring Conquests

Author: Matthew Liebmann
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN: 9781934691410
Size: 28.33 MB
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