Download a hunger so wide and so deep a multiracial view of womens eating problems in pdf or read a hunger so wide and so deep a multiracial view of womens eating problems in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get a hunger so wide and so deep a multiracial view of womens eating problems in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Eating Disorders And Obesity

Author: Laura H. Choate
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119026652
Size: 38.93 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 5732
Download and Read
Both practical and comprehensive, this book provides a clear framework for the assessment, treatment, and prevention of eating disorders and obesity. Focusing on best practices and offering a range of current techniques, leaders in the field examine these life-threatening disorders and propose treatment options for clients of all ages. This text, written specifically for counselors, benefits from the authors’ collective expertise and emphasizes practitioner-friendly, wellness-based approaches that counselors can use in their daily practice. Parts I and II of the text address risk factors in and sociocultural influences on the development of eating disorders, gender differences, the unique concerns of clients of color, ethical and legal issues, and assessment and diagnosis. Part III explores prevention and early intervention with high-risk groups in school, university, and community settings. The final section presents a variety of treatment interventions, such as cognitive–behavioral, interpersonal, dialectical behavior, and family-based therapy. *Requests for digital versions from the ACA can be found on wiley.com. *To request print copies, please visit the ACA website here. *Reproduction requests for material from books published by ACA should be directed to [email protected]

Obesity Eating Disorders And The Media

Author: Karin Eli
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131708635X
Size: 76.95 MB
Format: PDF
View: 2457
Download and Read
How do the media represent obesity and eating disorders? How are these representations related to one another? And how do the news media select which scientific findings and policy decisions to report? Multi-disciplinary in approach, Obesity, Eating Disorders and the Media presents critical new perspectives on media representations of obesity and eating disorders, with analyses of print, online, and televisual media framings. Exploring abjection and alarm as the common themes linking media framings of obesity and eating disorders, Obesity, Eating Disorders and the Media shows how the media similarly position these conditions as dangerous extremes of body size and food practice. The volume then investigates how news media selectively cover and represent science and policy concerning obesity and eating disorders, with close attention to the influence of pre-existing framings alongside institutional and moral agendas. A rich, comprehensive analysis of media framings of obesity and eating disorders - as embodied conditions, complex disorders, public health concerns, and culturally significant phenomena - this volume will be of interest to scholars and students across the social sciences and all those interested in understanding cultural aspects of obesity and eating disorders.

Food And Faith In Christian Culture

Author: Ken Albala
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231520794
Size: 37.23 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 4168
Download and Read
Without a uniform dietary code, Christians around the world used food in strikingly different ways, developing widely divergent practices that spread, nurtured, and strengthened their religious beliefs and communities. Featuring never-before published essays, this anthology follows the intersection of food and faith from the fourteenth to the twenty-first century, charting the complex relationship among religious eating habits and politics, culture, and social structure. Theoretically rich and full of engaging portraits, essays consider the rise of food buying and consumerism in the fourteenth century, the Reformation ideology of fasting and its resulting sanctions against sumptuous eating, the gender and racial politics of sacramental food production in colonial America, and the struggle to define "enlightened" Lenten dietary restrictions in early modern France. Essays on the nineteenth century explore the religious implications of wheat growing and breadmaking among New Zealand's Maori population and the revival of the Agape meal, or love feast, among American brethren in Christ Church. Twentieth-century topics include the metaphysical significance of vegetarianism, the function of diet in Greek Orthodoxy, American Christian weight loss programs, and the practice of silent eating rituals among English Benedictine monks. Two introductory essays detail the key themes tying these essays together and survey food's role in developing and disseminating the teachings of Christianity, not to mention providing a tangible experience of faith.

Embodied Politics In Visual Autobiography

Author: Sarah Brophy
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442666153
Size: 40.23 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 5837
Download and Read
From reality television to film, performance, and video art, autobiography is everywhere in today’s image-obsessed age. With contributions by both artists and scholars, Embodied Politics in Visual Autobiography is a unique examination of visual autobiography’s involvement in the global cultural politics of health, disability, and the body. This provocative collection looks at images of selfhood and embodiment in a variety of media and with a particular focus on bodily identities and practices that challenge the norm: a pregnant man in cyberspace, a fat activist performance troupe, indigenous artists intervening in museums, transnational selves who connect disability to war, and many more. The chapters in Embodied Politics in Visual Autobiography reflect several different theoretical approaches but share a common concern with the ways in which visual culture can generate resistance, critique, and creative interventions. With contributions that investigate digital media, installation art, graphic memoir, performance, film, reality television, photography, and video art, the collection offers a wide-ranging critical account of what is clearly becoming one of the most important issues in contemporary culture.

Eating Disorders Sourcebook

Author: Joyce Brennfleck Shannon
Publisher: Omnigraphics Incorporated
ISBN:
Size: 66.10 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 2095
Download and Read
"Provides basic consumer health information about risk factors, recovery from, and prevention and treatment of various eating disorders. Includes index, glossary of related terms, and other resources"--Provided by publisher.

Reconstructing Gender

Author: Estelle Disch
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities Social
ISBN: 9780072997422
Size: 61.34 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 3288
Download and Read
This United States-focused anthology on gender focuses on women and men and the multiple identities that comprise the lives of individuals across gender. Drawing from a wide range of sources including research articles, essays, and personal narratives, Disch has chosen accessible, engaging, and provocative readings that represent a plurality of perspectives and experiences. Eleven part introductions briefly identify important issues in the general ¿eld of study, describe the readings, identify the central themes emerging throughout the book, and raise questions for students to consider.

The Cult Of Thinness

Author: Sharlene Nagy Hesse-Biber
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195178784
Size: 30.41 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 2008
Download and Read
Whether they are rich or poor, liberal or conservative, religious or atheist, thriving or stagnant, most American women have one thing in common--they want to be thin--or thinner. And they are willing to go to extraordinary lengths to get that way, even to the point of starving themselves. Why are America's women so preoccupied with weight? Is there more to this preoccupation than weight alone? What has caused record numbers of young women--even before they reach their teenage years--to suffer from weight obsession, poor body image, and disordered eating? Why are some young women able to resist cultural pressures to be thin when others are not? Are there factors within American society that have fueled current outbreaks of anorexia and bulimia? The Cult of Thinness, Second Edition--a revised and expanded version of Sharlene Nagy Hesse-Biber's award-winning book, Am I Thin Enough Yet? (OUP, 1996)--answers these questions and more. Hesse-Biber goes beyond traditional psychological explanations of eating disorders to level a powerful indictment against the social, political, and economic pressures women face in a weight-obsessed society--a society that is, ironically, becoming increasingly more fat while worshipping a progressively more thin ideal. She examines the profit motives of corporate America that promote this paradox. Moreover, a new chapter on preteens, masculinity, ethnicity, gay and lesbian body image, and the globalization of body image issues align a refined cultural study of body image with the trends found in current research studies, demographic data, and popular culture. Using the metaphor of a cult, Hesse-Biber conveys the intense, day-to-day involvement that the pursuit of thinness demands. Examining the testimonies of young women concerning the practice of body rituals, she observes the extent to which these women sacrifice their bodies and minds to the pursuit of the ultra-slender ideal. She looks at pressures coming from their families and friends that perpetuate their cult-like practices and evaluates a range of therapies and personal and collective actions available to help women overcome their weight obsessions and eating problems. Hesse-Biber provides new frameworks for envisioning femininity and personal power, overcoming body insecurity, strengthening the inner self, and changing the cultural environment itself. Along the way, the reader is provided with important self-help tips to tackle the growing number of body image issues young women and new recruits to the "Cult of Thinness" continue to encounter. There are alternatives to the Cult of Thinness and this book provides a strong antidote.

Line Drawings

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 27.54 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 912
Download and Read
At the heart of feminist theory lies the seemingly intractable issue of essentialism. Feminism has thus far failed to transcend critiques of essentialism, and currently offers only two inadequate positions against it. One response reifies the category "women", representing the experience of oppression of privileged women as archetypal for feminism, and the other denies the category because it unjustly overgeneralizes, thus undercutting the possibility of a robust theory of gender oppression. To spur anti-essentialist methods and practice around such issues as sexual violence, feminist theory crucially needs a constructive and politically powerful strategy for defining women. Cressida J. Heyes deftly elucidates and then travels beyond the essentialism debates to rescue the efficacy of feminist theory for activism and research. She offers a genealogy of essentialism, specifically as it applies to the work of Carol Gilligan and Catharine MacKinnon, and employs a Wittgensteinian approach to feminism that understands similarities between women as family resemblances and political decisions about inclusion and exclusion as contextual and purposive. Line Drawings argues for an anti-essentialist method that enables generalizing feminist discourse but insists on paying close attention to the operations of power in constructing claims about women. This is a fresh and vitally important step past stymied debate on what is arguably the most pressing issue in cross-disciplinary feminist theory.