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A Quiet Victory For Latino Rights

Author: Patrick D. Lukens
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816599645
Size: 78.95 MB
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In 1935 a federal court judge handed down a ruling that could have been disastrous for Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and all Latinos in the United States. However, in an unprecedented move, the Roosevelt administration wielded the power of "administrative law" to neutralize the decision and thereby dealt a severe blow to the nativist movement. A Quiet Victory for Latino Rights recounts this important but little-known story. To the dismay of some nativist groups, the Immigration Act of 1924, which limited the number of immigrants who could be admitted annually, did not apply to immigrants from Latin America. In response to nativist legal maneuverings, the 1935 decision said that the act could be applied to Mexican immigrants. That decision, which ruled that the Mexican petitioners were not "free white person[s]," might have paved the road to segregation for all Latinos. The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), founded in 1929, had worked to sensitize the Roosevelt administration to the tenuous position of Latinos in the United States. Advised by LULAC, the Mexican government, and the US State Department, the administration used its authority under administrative law to have all Mexican immigrants—and Mexican Americans—classified as "white." It implemented the policy when the federal judiciary "acquiesced" to the New Deal, which in effect prevented further rulings. In recounting this story, complete with colorful characters and unlikely bedfellows, Patrick Lukens adds a significant chapter to the racial history of the United States.

Latinos And The Voting Rights Act

Author: Henry Flores
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739190466
Size: 42.81 MB
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This volume explores the role race and racism played in the Texas redistricting process and the creation and passage of the state’s Voter Identification Law in 2011. The author puts forth research techniques designed to uncover racism and racist intentions even in the face of denials by the public policy decision makers involved. In addition to reviewing the redistricting history of the state, this book also provides an analysis of court decisions concerning the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution, the Voting Rights Act, and a thorough discussion of the Shelby County decision. The author brings together scholarly research and the analysis of significant Supreme Court decisions focusing on race to discuss Texas’ election policy process. The core of the book centers on two federal court trials where both the state’s congressional, house redistricting efforts, and the Voter ID Bill were found to violate the Voting Rights Act. This is the first book that speaks specifically to the effects of electoral politics and Latinos. The author develops new ground in racial political studies calling for movement beyond the 'dual-race' theoretical models that have been used by both the academy and the courts in looking at the effects of race on the public policy process. The author concludes that the historically tense race relations between Anglos and Latinos in Texas unavoidably affected both the redistricting process and the creation and design of the Voter ID Bill.

50 Events That Shaped Latino History An Encyclopedia Of The American Mosaic 2 Volumes

Author: Lilia Fernández
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440837635
Size: 77.69 MB
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What are the historical events most key to shaping Latino culture? This book provides detailed and broad coverage of the 50 most pivotal developments across more than 500 years' time that have shaped the Latino experience, offering primary sources, biographies of notable figures, and suggested readings for further research. • Offers scholarly analysis of critical events in Latino/a history while also providing in-depth primary sources, biographies, and evidence that provide additional historical perspective • Represents an invaluable reference tool for students doing research papers, seeking accessibly written background information, or simply wanting to learn more about Latinos in the United States • Written by expert contributors with specialties in a variety of key fields—media, politics, history, and popular culture • Supplies breadth and depth on significant events that have shaped the Latino experience for the past five centuries

Twenty First Century Dynamics Of Multiculturalism

Author: Martin Guevara Urbina
Publisher: Charles C Thomas Publisher
ISBN: 0398080992
Size: 55.43 MB
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In the twenty-first century few studies have delineated the U.S. multiculturalism story beyond black and white, to include the truths and realities of other Americans over time, resulting in highly skewed academic publications. While the white experience and, to a lesser extent, the black experience, has been well documented, the brown experience, for instance, has been neglected, minimized, or excluded from the pages of history. Clearly, there has been a great need for researchers to examine the multiple intertwining forces of historical and contemporary movements defining, shaping, and governing the everyday experience of America’s people. In the face of centuries of manipulation, exploitation, oppression, and sometimes brutal violence, blacks, browns, reds, yellows, and others are still here, fighting not only for ethnic and racial tolerance but also for equality, justice, respect, and human dignity. In fact, despite the long legacy of hate, violence, and oppression against America’s most disadvantaged communities, particularly undocumented people, the minority population will continue to grow and, with pressing demographic shifts, ethnic and racial minorities will soon become the new face of America. In delineating the dynamics of multiculturalism over the years, contributing authors illustrate that the United States is nowhere near a post-racial society, and thus we must prioritize equality, justice, and multiculturalism if the U.S. is in fact going to have a balanced system. Globally, the United States must actively engage in significant and positive social transformation in the new millennium, if the U.S. is going to be situated and reflective of a post-racial society in the twenty-first century. Twenty-First Century Dynamics of Multiculturalism will be of benefit to professionals in the fields of sociology, history, minority studies, Mexican American (Chicano) studies, ethnic (Latino) studies, law, political science, and also those concerned with sociolegal issues.

Debating American Identity

Author: Linda C. Noel
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816530459
Size: 16.62 MB
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Debating American Identity is an innovative look at four national debates over the inclusion of the Mexican-origin population in the United States in the early twentieth century. Linda C. Noel explores different conceptions of American identity through disputes over Arizona and New Mexico statehood, temporary workers, immigration, and repatriation.

The Trials Of Eroy Brown

Author: Michael Berryhill
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292726945
Size: 30.53 MB
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In April 1981, two white Texas prison officials died at the hands of a black inmate at the Ellis prison farm near Huntsville. Warden Wallace Pack and farm manager Billy Moore were the highest-ranking Texas prison officials ever to die in the line of duty. The warden was drowned face down in a ditch. The farm manager was shot once in the head with the warden's gun. The man who admitted to killing them, a burglar and robber named Eroy Brown, surrendered meekly, claiming self-defense. In any other era of Texas prison history, Brown's fate would have seemed certain: execution. But in 1980, federal judge William Wayne Justice had issued a sweeping civil rights ruling in which he found that prison officials had systematically and often brutally violated the rights of Texas inmates. In the light of that landmark prison civil rights case, Ruiz v. Estelle, Brown had a chance of being believed. The Trials of Eroy Brown, the first book devoted to Brown's astonishing defense, is based on trial documents, exhibits, and journalistic accounts of Brown's three trials, which ended in his acquittal. Michael Berryhill presents Brown's story in his own words, set against the backdrop of the chilling plantation mentality of Texas prisons. Brown's attorneys—Craig Washington, Bill Habern, and Tim Sloan—undertook heroic strategies to defend him, even when the state refused to pay their fees. The Trials of Eroy Brown tells a landmark story of prison civil rights and the collapse of Jim Crow justice in Texas.

Lone Star Law

Author: Michael S. Ariens
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780896726956
Size: 26.54 MB
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"An overarching history of the law and legal culture of Texas, particularly investigating the days of early settlement through 1920; Texas's law of property, families, and businesses; criminal law and tort law; and the Texas legal profession"--Provided by publisher.

Roosevelt S Centurions

Author: Joseph E. Persico
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 0679645438
Size: 74.93 MB
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All American presidents are commanders in chief by law. Few perform as such in practice. In Roosevelt’s Centurions, distinguished historian Joseph E. Persico reveals how, during World War II, Franklin D. Roosevelt seized the levers of wartime power like no president since Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War. Declaring himself “Dr. Win-the-War,” FDR assumed the role of strategist in chief, and, though surrounded by star-studded generals and admirals, he made clear who was running the war. FDR was a hands-on war leader, involving himself in everything from choosing bomber targets to planning naval convoys to the design of landing craft. Persico explores whether his strategic decisions, including his insistence on the Axis powers’ unconditional surrender, helped end or may have prolonged the war. Taking us inside the Allied war councils, the author reveals how the president brokered strategy with contentious allies, particularly the iron-willed Winston Churchill; rallied morale on the home front; and handpicked a team of proud, sometimes prickly warriors who, he believed, could fight a global war. Persico’s history offers indelible portraits of the outsize figures who roused the “sleeping giant” that defeated the Axis war machine: the dutiful yet independent-minded George C. Marshall, charged with rebuilding an army whose troops trained with broomsticks for rifles, eggs for hand grenades; Dwight Eisenhower, an unassuming Kansan elevated from obscurity to command of the greatest fighting force ever assembled; the vainglorious Douglas MacArthur; and the bizarre battlefield genius George S. Patton. Here too are less widely celebrated military leaders whose contributions were just as critical: the irascible, dictatorial navy chief, Ernest King; the acerbic army advisor in China, “Vinegar” Joe Stilwell; and Henry H. “Hap” Arnold, who zealously preached the gospel of modern air power. The Roosevelt who emerges from these pages is a wartime chess master guiding America’s armed forces to a victory that was anything but foreordained. What are the qualities we look for in a commander in chief? In an era of renewed conflict, when Americans are again confronting the questions that FDR faced—about the nature and exercise of global power—Roosevelt’s Centurions is a timely and revealing examination of what it takes to be a wartime leader in a freewheeling, complicated, and tumultuous democracy. Praise for Roosevelt’s Centurions “FDR’s centurions were my heroes and guides. Now Joe Persico has written the best account of those leaders I've ever read.”—Colin L. Powell “Benefiting from his years of studying Franklin Roosevelt and his times, Joseph Persico has brought us a briskly paced story with much wisdom and new insights on FDR, his military liege men, World War II, and political and military leadership.”—Michael Beschloss, author of Presidential Courage: Brave Leaders and How They Changed America 1789–1989 “Long wars demand long books, but these are 550 pages of lively prose by a good writer who knows his subject. . . . A fine, straightforward politics-and-great-men history.”—Kirkus Reviews “Persico makes a persuasive case that FDR was clearly in charge of the most important decisions of the American war plan.”—The Washington Times From the Hardcover edition.

Fdr And The End Of Empire

Author: Christopher D. O'Sullivan
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 1137025247
Size: 77.74 MB
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An account of the origins of American involvement in the Middle East during the Presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt.