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A Very Fine Class Of Immigrants

Author: Lucille H. Campey
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1550027719
Size: 18.98 MB
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P.E.I. was the first Canadian area to acquire Scottish pioneers. Its colonization by Scots occurred when the process of immigration and settlement was in its infancy.

A Very Fine Class Of Immigrants

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Scots who opted for pioneer life in Prince Edward Island are the subject of this book. Being the first of the "northern" colonies to be sold off in its entirety to proprietors in the late eighteenth century, P.E.I. acquired its Scots earliest, doing so even before the start of the American War of Independence in 1775. The colonization of Prince Edward Island by Scots takes us back to a period when the process of emigration and settlement were in their infancy. The Pioneer Scots of Prince Edward Island should command our respect. They showed tremendous courage and determination and most were successful. Previous studies of early Scottish emigration to the New World have tended to concentrate on the miseries of evictions and the destruction of old communities. In this groundbreaking study of the influx of Scots to Prince Edward Island, the widely held assumption that emigration was solely a flight from poverty is challenged. By uncovering previously unreported ship crossings, as well as a wide range of manuscripts and underused sources such as customs records and newspaper shipping reports, the book provides the most comprehensive account to date of the influx of Scots to the Island. "A Very Fine Class of Immigrants" is essential reading for individuals wishing to trace family links or deepen their understanding of how and why the Island came to acquire its distinctive Scottish communities. And by accessing, for the first time, shipping sources like Lloyd's List and the Lloyd's Shipping Register, the author brings a new dimension to our understanding of emigrant travel. Lucille H. Campey demonstrates that far from sailing on disease-ridden leaky tubs, as popularly imagined, the Island's Pioneer Scots usually crossed the Atlantic on the best available ships of the time.

Planters Paupers And Pioneers

Author: Lucille H. Campey
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1459705084
Size: 69.62 MB
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The first in a series of three titles on The English in Canada, this book focuses on factors that brought the English to Canada, tracing the English arrivals to the various settlements. Drawing on wide-raging documentary resources, this book is essential reading for individuals wishing to trace English and Canadian family links.

The Silver Chief

Author: Lucille H. Campey
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 9781896219882
Size: 70.82 MB
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Called ?The Silver Chief” by the Native Chiefs with whom he negotiated a land treaty at Red River, the fifth Earl of Selkirk helped Scottish Highlanders relocate in Canada.

The Scottish Pioneers Of Upper Canada 1784 1855

Author: Lucille H. Campey
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1770704442
Size: 29.24 MB
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Glengarry, Upper Canada’s first major Scottish settlement, was established in 1784 by Highlanders from Inverness-shire. Worsening economic conditions in Scotland, coupled with a growing awareness of Upper Canada’s opportunities, led to a growing tide of emigration that eventually engulfed all of Scotland and gave the province its many Scottish settlements. Pride in their culture gave Scots a strong sense of identity and self-worth. These factors contributed to their success and left Upper Canada with firmly rooted Scottish traditions. Individual settlements have been well observed, but the overall picture has never been pieced together. Why did Upper Canada have such appeal to Scots? What was their impact on the province? Why did they choose their different settlement locations? Drawing on new and wide-ranging sources author Lucille H. Campey charts the progress of Scottish settlement throughout Upper Canada. This book contains much descriptive information, including all known passenger lists. It gives details of the 550 ships, which made over 900 crossings and carried almost 100,000 emigrant Scots. The book describes the enterprise and independence shown by the pioneers who were helped on their way by some remarkable characters such as Thomas Talbot, Lord Selkirk, John Galt, Archibald McNab and William Dickson. Providing a fascinating overview of the emigration process, it is essential reading for both historians and genealogists. Scots were some of the provinces earliest pioneers and they were always at the cutting edge of each new frontier. They were a founding people who had an enormous influence on the province’s early development. "I am happy to commend Lucille Campey’s latest book on Scottish settlement patterns in Canada. The product of meticulous research, The Scottish Pioneers of Upper Canada has much to offer both genealogists and general readers, as it weaves together statistical information, institutional histories and personal accounts to produce a fascinating picture of the multi-dimensional networks that underpinned the transatlantic movement and brought 100,000 Scots to Upper Canada during the seven decades reviewed. Persistent myths of helpless exile are challenged, as the preconditions and processes of emigration are analyzed, along with the cultural traditions imported by the ’trail blazers and border guards’ who laid the foundations of Canada’s most populous province." - Marjory Harper, Reader in History, University of Aberdeen "With a real feel for the sacrifice and the emotional turmoil of the pioneers, Lucille H. Campey has one again got her audience to face the raw heritage common to every Scots-Canadian. This is an excellent read, full of fascinating detail dug from much archival research. This book is another splendid addition to a series of much interest to both historians and genealogists." - Professor Graeme Morton, Scottish Studies Foundation Chair, University of Guelph

After The Hector

Author: Lucille H. Campey
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1554880688
Size: 42.15 MB
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This is the first fully documented and detailed account, produced in recent times, of one of the greatest early migrations of Scots to North America. The arrival of the Hector in 1773, with nearly 200 Scottish passengers, sparked a huge influx of Scots to Nova Scotia and Cape Breton. Thousands of Scots, mainly from the Highlands and Islands, streamed into the province during the late 1700s and the first half of the nineteenth century. Lucille Campey traces the process of emigration and explains why Scots chose their different settlement locations in Nova Scotia and Cape Breton. Much detailed information has been distilled to provide new insights on how, why and when the province came to acquire its distinctive Scottish communities. Challenging the widely held assumption that this was primarily a flight from poverty, After the Hector reveals how Scots were being influenced by positive factors, such as the opportunity for greater freedoms and better livelihoods. The suffering and turmoil of the later Highland Clearances have cast a long shadow over earlier events, creating a false impression that all emigration had been forced on people. Hard facts show that most emigration was voluntary, self-financed and pursued by people expecting to improve their economic prospects. A combination of push and pull factors brought Scots to Nova Scotia, laying down a rich and deep seam of Scottish culture that continues to flourish. Extensively documented with all known passenger lists and details of over three hundred ship crossings, this book tells their story. "The saga of the Scots who found a home away from home in Nova Scotia, told in a straightforward, unembellished, no-nonsense style with some surprises along the way. This book contains much of vital interest to historians and genealogists." - Professor Edward J. Cowan, University of Glasgow "...a well-written, crisp narrative that provides a useful outline of the known Scottish settlements up to the middle of the 19th century...avoid[s] the sentimental ’victim & scapegoat approach’ to the topic and instead has provided an account of the attractions and mechanisms of settlement...." - Professor Michael Vance, St. Mary’s University, Halifax

With Axe And Bible

Author: Lucille H. Campey
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1897045220
Size: 25.82 MB
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Lucille H. Campey traces the progress of Scottish colonization and its ramifications for New Brunswicks early development. This book is a must for genealogists.

Fast Sailing And Copper Bottomed

Author: Lucille H. Campey
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 9781896219318
Size: 14.30 MB
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Stories of the Aberdeen-built ships that carried emigrant Scots to Canada are documented in this account of early Scottish emigration.

Les Cossais

Author: Lucille H. Campey
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1459711165
Size: 48.37 MB
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This is the first fully documented account, produced in modern times, of the migration of Scots to Lower Canada. Scots were in the forefront of the early influx of British settlers, which began in the late eighteenth century. John Nairne and Malcolm Fraser were two of the first Highlanders to make their mark on the province, arriving at La Malbaie soon after the Treaty of Paris in 1763. By the early 1800s many Scottish settlements had been formed along the north side of the Ottawa River, in the Chateauguay Valley to the southwest of Montreal, and in the Gaspe region. Then, as economic conditions in the Highlands and Islands deteriorated by the late 1820s, large numbers of Hebridean crofters settled in the Eastern Townships. The first group came from Arran and the later arrivals from Lewis. Les Ecossais were proud of their Scottish traditions and customs, those living reminders of the old country which had been left behind. In the end they became assimilated into Quebec’s French-speaking society, but along the way they had a huge impact on the province’s early development. How were les Ecossais regarded by their French neighbours? Were they successful pioneers? In her book, Lucille H. Campey assesses their impact as she unravels their story. Drawing from a wide range of fascinating sources, she considers the process of settlement and the harsh realities of life in the New World. She explains how Quebec province came to acquire its distinctive Scottish communities and offers new insights on their experiences and achievements.