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A Very Fine Class Of Immigrants

Author: Lucille H. Campey
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1550027719
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P.E.I. was the first Canadian area to acquire Scottish pioneers. Its colonization by Scots occurred when the process of immigration and settlement was in its infancy.

A Very Fine Class Of Immigrants

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Scots who opted for pioneer life in Prince Edward Island are the subject of this book. Being the first of the "northern" colonies to be sold off in its entirety to proprietors in the late eighteenth century, P.E.I. acquired its Scots earliest, doing so even before the start of the American War of Independence in 1775. The colonization of Prince Edward Island by Scots takes us back to a period when the process of emigration and settlement were in their infancy. The Pioneer Scots of Prince Edward Island should command our respect. They showed tremendous courage and determination and most were successful. Previous studies of early Scottish emigration to the New World have tended to concentrate on the miseries of evictions and the destruction of old communities. In this groundbreaking study of the influx of Scots to Prince Edward Island, the widely held assumption that emigration was solely a flight from poverty is challenged. By uncovering previously unreported ship crossings, as well as a wide range of manuscripts and underused sources such as customs records and newspaper shipping reports, the book provides the most comprehensive account to date of the influx of Scots to the Island. "A Very Fine Class of Immigrants" is essential reading for individuals wishing to trace family links or deepen their understanding of how and why the Island came to acquire its distinctive Scottish communities. And by accessing, for the first time, shipping sources like Lloyd's List and the Lloyd's Shipping Register, the author brings a new dimension to our understanding of emigrant travel. Lucille H. Campey demonstrates that far from sailing on disease-ridden leaky tubs, as popularly imagined, the Island's Pioneer Scots usually crossed the Atlantic on the best available ships of the time.

Imperial Immigrants

Author: Michael E. Vance
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1554887569
Size: 73.52 MB
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Between 1815 and 1832, Great Britain settled more than 3,500 individuals, mostly from the Scottish Lowlands, in the Ottawa Valley. These government-assisted emigrations, which began immediately after the Napoleonic Wars, are explored to reveal their impact on Upper Canada. Seeking to transform their lives and their society, early Scots settlers crossed the Atlantic for their own purposes. Although they did not blindly serve the interests of empire builders, their settlement led to the dispossession of the original First Nation inhabitants, thus supporting the British imperial government's strategic military goals. After transferring homeland religious and political conflict to the colony, Scottish settlers led the demand for political reform that emerged in the 1830s. As a consequence, their migration and settlement reveals as much about the depth of social conflict in the homeland and in the colonies as it does about the preoccupations of the British imperial state.

After The Hector

Author: Lucille H. Campey
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1554880688
Size: 34.96 MB
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This is the first fully documented and detailed account, produced in recent times, of one of the greatest early migrations of Scots to North America. The arrival of the Hector in 1773, with nearly 200 Scottish passengers, sparked a huge influx of Scots to Nova Scotia and Cape Breton. Thousands of Scots, mainly from the Highlands and Islands, streamed into the province during the late 1700s and the first half of the nineteenth century. Lucille Campey traces the process of emigration and explains why Scots chose their different settlement locations in Nova Scotia and Cape Breton. Much detailed information has been distilled to provide new insights on how, why and when the province came to acquire its distinctive Scottish communities. Challenging the widely held assumption that this was primarily a flight from poverty, After the Hector reveals how Scots were being influenced by positive factors, such as the opportunity for greater freedoms and better livelihoods. The suffering and turmoil of the later Highland Clearances have cast a long shadow over earlier events, creating a false impression that all emigration had been forced on people. Hard facts show that most emigration was voluntary, self-financed and pursued by people expecting to improve their economic prospects. A combination of push and pull factors brought Scots to Nova Scotia, laying down a rich and deep seam of Scottish culture that continues to flourish. Extensively documented with all known passenger lists and details of over three hundred ship crossings, this book tells their story. "The saga of the Scots who found a home away from home in Nova Scotia, told in a straightforward, unembellished, no-nonsense style with some surprises along the way. This book contains much of vital interest to historians and genealogists." - Professor Edward J. Cowan, University of Glasgow "...a well-written, crisp narrative that provides a useful outline of the known Scottish settlements up to the middle of the 19th century...avoid[s] the sentimental ’victim & scapegoat approach’ to the topic and instead has provided an account of the attractions and mechanisms of settlement...." - Professor Michael Vance, St. Mary’s University, Halifax

With Axe And Bible

Author: Lucille H. Campey
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1897045220
Size: 23.55 MB
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Lucille H. Campey traces the progress of Scottish colonization and its ramifications for New Brunswicks early development. This book is a must for genealogists.

The Silver Chief

Author: Lucille H. Campey
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1770704388
Size: 66.20 MB
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Belfast, Prince Edward Island, founded in August 1803, owes its existence to Lord Selkirk. Its bicentennial is a timely reminder of Selkirk’s work in Canada, which extended beyond Belfast to Baldoon (later Wallaceburg) in Ontario, as well as to Red River, the precursor to Winnipeg. Aptly named "The Silver Chief" by the five Indian chiefs with whom he negotiated a land treaty at Red River, the fifth Earl of Selkirk spent an immense fortune in helping Scottish Highlanders relocate themselves in Canada. Selkirk has been well observed through the eyes of the rich and powerful, but his settlers have been neglected. Why did they leave Scotland? Which districts did they come from? Why did they settle in Canada? Why did Selkirk help them? How successful were their settlements? What impact did they have on Canada’s early development? Did Selkirk realize his ambitions for Canada? In answering these questions, Lucille H. Campey presents a new and powerful case for re-assessing the achievements of Selkirk and his settlers. Using a wealth of documentary sources, she reconstructs the sequence of emigration from Scotland to the three areas of Canada where settlements were founded. She shows that emigration took place in a carefully planned and controlled way. She reveals the self-reliance, adaptability and steely determination of the Selkirk settlers in overcoming their many problems and obstacles. They brought their rich traditions of Scottish culture to Canada and, in doing so, helped to secure its distinctively Canadian future. Together, Selkirk and his settlers succeeded against overwhelming odds and altered the course of history.

Der Selbstmord Europas

Author: Douglas Murray
Publisher: FinanzBuch Verlag
ISBN: 3960921802
Size: 64.78 MB
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Sinkende Geburtenraten, unkontrollierte Masseneinwanderung und eine lange Tradition des verinnerlichten Misstrauens: Europa scheint unfähig zu sein, seine Interessen zu verteidigen. Douglas Murray, gefeierter Autor, sieht in seinem neuen Bestseller Europa gar an der Schwelle zum Freitod – zumindest scheinen sich seine politischen Führer für den Selbstmord entschieden zu haben. Doch warum haben die europäischen Regierungen einen Prozess angestoßen, wohl wissend, dass sie dessen Folgen weder absehen können noch im Griff haben? Warum laden sie Tausende von muslimischen Einwanderern ein, nach Europa zu kommen, wenn die Bevölkerung diese mit jedem Jahr stärker ablehnt? Sehen die Regierungen nicht, dass ihre Entscheidungen nicht nur die Bevölkerung ihrer Länder auseinandertreiben, sondern letztlich auch Europa zerreißen werden? Oder sind sie so sehr von ihrer Vision eines neuen europäischen Menschen, eines neuen Europas und der arroganten Überzeugung von deren Machbarkeit geblendet? Der Selbstmord Europas ist kein spontan entstandenes Pamphlet einer vagen Befindlichkeit. Akribisch hat Douglas Murray die Einwanderung aus Afrika und dem Nahen Osten nach Europa recherchiert und ihre Anfänge, ihre Entwicklung sowie die gesellschaftlichen Folgen über mehrere Jahrzehnte ebenso studiert wie ihre Einmündung in den alltäglich werdenden Terrorismus. Eine beeindruckende und erschütternde Analyse der Zeit, in der wir leben, sowie der Zustände, auf die wir zusteuern.

Les Cossais

Author: Lucille H. Campey
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1459711165
Size: 40.39 MB
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This is the first fully documented account, produced in modern times, of the migration of Scots to Lower Canada. Scots were in the forefront of the early influx of British settlers, which began in the late eighteenth century. John Nairne and Malcolm Fraser were two of the first Highlanders to make their mark on the province, arriving at La Malbaie soon after the Treaty of Paris in 1763. By the early 1800s many Scottish settlements had been formed along the north side of the Ottawa River, in the Chateauguay Valley to the southwest of Montreal, and in the Gaspe region. Then, as economic conditions in the Highlands and Islands deteriorated by the late 1820s, large numbers of Hebridean crofters settled in the Eastern Townships. The first group came from Arran and the later arrivals from Lewis. Les Ecossais were proud of their Scottish traditions and customs, those living reminders of the old country which had been left behind. In the end they became assimilated into Quebec’s French-speaking society, but along the way they had a huge impact on the province’s early development. How were les Ecossais regarded by their French neighbours? Were they successful pioneers? In her book, Lucille H. Campey assesses their impact as she unravels their story. Drawing from a wide range of fascinating sources, she considers the process of settlement and the harsh realities of life in the New World. She explains how Quebec province came to acquire its distinctive Scottish communities and offers new insights on their experiences and achievements.