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A War Of Peoples 1914 1919

Author: Adrian Gregory
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199542589
Size: 74.36 MB
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This new perspective on the First World War offers a concise narrative of the war in its global context, from the first military actions in July 1914 to the signing of the peace treaty by Germany in July 1919, and explores how our understanding of the war has changed over time.

The Oxford Handbook Of European History 1914 1945

Author: Nicholas Doumanis
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0191017752
Size: 64.70 MB
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The period spanning the two World Wars was unquestionably the most catastrophic in Europe's history. Despite such undeniably progressive developments as the radical expansion of women's suffrage and rising health standards, the era was dominated by political violence and chronic instability. Its symbols were Verdun, Guernica, and Auschwitz. By the end of this dark period, tens of millions of Europeans had been killed and more still had been displaced and permanently traumatized. If the nineteenth century gave Europeans cause to regard the future with a sense of optimism, the early twentieth century had them anticipating the destruction of civilization. The fact that so many revolutions, regime changes, dictatorships, mass killings, and civil wars took place within such a compressed time frame suggests that Europe experienced a general crisis. Indeed in the early 1940s both Charles de Gaulle and Winston Churchill referred to a 'thirty years war'. Why did so many crises rage across the continent from 1914 until the end of the Second World War? Why did the winds of destruction affect some regions more than others? The Oxford Handbook of European History, 1914-1945 reconsiders the most significant features of this calamitous age from a transnational perspective. It demonstrates the degree to which national experiences were intertwined with those of other nations, and how each crisis was implicated in wider regional, continental, and global developments. Readers will find innovative and stimulating chapters on various political, social, and economic subjects by some of the leading scholars working on modern European history today.

Themes In Modern European History 1890 1945

Author: Fellow and Tutor in Modern History and Politics Paul Hayes
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134897235
Size: 13.71 MB
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Themes in European History treats in thematic fashion a period of great change and upheaval in Europe. A collection of twelve essays by five leading historians, this textbook: * highlights important developments and changes that occurred * sets these changes in their social and cultural context as well as in the political framework * concentrates on the most important powers in Europe * vompletes each essay with suggestions for further reading to guide your students into continuing their research. Whereas other textbooks of this period focus on the political events, Themes in Modern European History uses a comparative history of institutions and societies, with emphasis on the cultural changes as well. Students are provided with the whole picture of events and are made aware of the wider consequences of the changes taking place - enabling them to understand all aspects of the dramatic transformation of Europe from 1890-1945.

The Oxford Illustrated History Of The First World War

Author: Hew Strachan
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191640417
Size: 63.53 MB
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The First World War, now a century ago, still shapes the world in which we live, and its legacy lives on, in poetry, in prose, in collective memory and political culture. By the time the war ended in 1918, millions lay dead. Three major empires lay shattered by defeat, those of Germany, Austria-Hungary, and the Ottomans. A fourth, Russia, was in the throes of a revolution that helped define the rest of the twentieth century. The Oxford History of the First World War brings together in one volume many of the most distinguished historians of the conflict, in an account that matches the scale of the events. From its causes to its consequences, from the Western Front to the Eastern, from the strategy of the politicians to the tactics of the generals, they chart the course of the war and assess its profound political and human consequences. Chapters on economic mobilization, the impact on women, the role of propaganda, and the rise of socialism establish the wider context of the fighting at sea and in the air, and which ranged on land from the trenches of Flanders to the mountains of the Balkans and the deserts of the Middle East. First published for the 90th anniversary of the 1918 Armistice, this highly illustrated revised edition contains significant new material to mark the 100th anniversary of the war's outbreak.

English History 1914 1945

Author: A. J. P. Taylor
Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks
ISBN: 0192801406
Size: 53.72 MB
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This book chronicles three decades largely overshadowed by war and mass unemployment. It was a period that saw in England the formation of a national government, the only genuine incidence of three-party politics, the fruition of campaigns for trades union recognition, women's suffrage, and Irish independence, and abroad withdrawal from the Gold Standard and involvement in collective security. Written in Taylor's customary provocative style, this is historical writing at its best. - ;This book begins on 4 August 1914, the day Britain entered the 'Great War', and describes the three decades of unparalleled upheaval and change up to the defeat of Japan in 1945, which marked the end of the Second World War. Twin themes of international conflict and mass unemployment in England predominate - besides giving a full account of foreign and domestic politics which were elaborated to deal with them, Taylor also pays particular attention to the impact of events on everyday lives. This book is an essential work from one of the finest historians of the twentieth century, which no one interested in the affairs of the UK will want to be without. -

The Lights That Failed

Author: Zara S. Steiner
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199226865
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Challenging the common assumption that the Treaty of Versailles led to the opening of a second European war, this book provides an analysis of the attempts to reconstruct Europe during the 1920s. It examines the efforts that failed but also those which gave hope for future promise that are usually underestimated, if not ignored.

The Russian Revolution 1905 1921

Author: Mark D. Steinberg
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199227624
Size: 20.93 MB
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The Russian Revolution, 1905-1921 is a new history of Russia's revolutionary era as a story of experience-of people making sense of history as it unfolded in their own lives and as they took part in making history themselves. The major events, trends, and explanations, reaching from Bloody Sunday in 1905 to the final shots of the civil war in 1921, are viewed through the doubled perspective of the professional historian looking backward and the contemporary journalist reporting and interpreting history as it happened. The volume then turns toward particular places and people: city streets, peasant villages, the margins of empire (Central Asia, Ukraine, the Jewish Pale), women and men, workers and intellectuals, artists and activists, utopian visionaries, and discontents of all kinds. We spend time with the famous (Vladimir Lenin, Lev Trotsky, Alexandra Kollontai, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Isaac Babel) and with those whose names we don't even know. Key themes include difference and inequality (social, economic, gendered, ethnic), power and resistance, violence, and ideas about justice and freedom. Written especially for students and general readers, this history relies extensively on contemporary texts and voices in order to bring the past and its meanings to life. This is a history about dramatic and uncertain times and especially about the interpretations, values, emotions, desires, and disappointments that made history matter to those who lived it.

The Last Great War

Author: Adrian Gregory
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107650860
Size: 32.69 MB
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What was it that the British people believed they were fighting for in 1914–18? This compelling history of the British home front during the First World War offers an entirely new account of how British society understood and endured the war. Drawing on official archives, memoirs, diaries and letters, Adrian Gregory sheds new light on the public reaction to the war, examining the role of propaganda and rumour in fostering patriotism and hatred of the enemy. He shows the importance of the ethic of volunteerism and the rhetoric of sacrifice in debates over where the burdens of war should fall as well as the influence of religious ideas on wartime culture. As the war drew to a climax and tensions about the distribution of sacrifices threatened to tear society apart, he shows how victory and the processes of commemoration helped create a fiction of a society united in grief.

Imperial Germany 1871 1918

Author: James Retallack
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 019160710X
Size: 48.16 MB
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The German Empire was founded in January 1871 not only on the basis of Chancellor Otto von Bismarck's 'blood and iron' policy but also with the support of liberal nationalists. Under Bismarck and Kaiser Wilhelm II, Germany became the dynamo of Europe. Its economic and military power were pre-eminent; its science and technology, education, and municipal administration were the envy of the world; and its avant-garde artists reflected the ferment in European culture. But Germany also played a decisive role in tipping Europe's fragile balance of power over the brink and into the cataclysm of the First World War, eventually leading to the empire's collapse in military defeat and revolution in November 1918. With contributions from an international team of twelve experts in the field, this volume offers an ideal introduction to this crucial era, taking care to situate Imperial Germany in the larger sweep of modern German history, without suggesting that Nazism or the Holocaust were inevitable endpoints to the developments charted here.