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Action Science

Author: William H. Robertson
Publisher: Corwin Press
ISBN: 145225656X
Size: 80.90 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Put student engagement on the fast-track Think action sports like skateboarding and BMX have nothing to do with physical science? Think again, especially as they relate to fundamental physics concepts--not to mention the problem solving required. What’s more, because kids will want to, observing action sports is the perfect vehicle for promoting self-directed and collaborative learning . . . with Action Science as your driver’s manual. Through a combination of book and video, Robertson provides all the materials you’ll need to get started, with the NGSS very much in full view. You’ll find: Detailed instructional methods Hands-on classroom activities and experiments Captivating video via QR codes

How People Learn

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309131979
Size: 75.13 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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First released in the Spring of 1999, How People Learn has been expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods--to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. Topics include: How learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain. How existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn. What the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach. The amazing learning potential of infants. The relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace. Learning needs and opportunities for teachers. A realistic look at the role of technology in education.

Active Learning

Author: Charles C. Bonwell
Publisher: Jossey-Bass
ISBN: 9781878380081
Size: 13.40 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Presents active learning as a teaching method that results in greater student involvement and knowledge retention. Includes modifications to traditional lectures, alternative lecture formats, challenges in active learning, practical strategies, and more.

Teaching Information Literacy In Higher Education

Author: Mariann Lokse
Publisher: Chandos Publishing
ISBN: 0081010052
Size: 15.11 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Why do we teach information literacy? This book argues that the main purpose of information literacy teaching in higher education is to enhance student learning. With the impact of new technologies, a proliferation of information sources and a change in the student demography, information literacy has become increasingly important in academia. Also, students that know how to learn have a better chance of adapting their learning strategies to the demands of higher education, and thus completing their degree. The authors discuss the various aspects of how academic integrity and information literacy are linked to learning, and provide examples on how our theories can be put into practice. The book also provides insight on the normative side of higher education, namely academic formation and the personal development process of students. The cognitive aspects of the transition to higher education, including learning strategies and critical thinking, are explored; and finally the book asks how information literacy teaching in higher education might be improved to help students meet contemporary challenges. Presents critical thinking and learning strategies as a basic foundation for information literacy Covers information literacy as a way into deep learning/higher order thinking Provides self-regulation, motivation, and self-respect as tools in learning Emphasizes the interdependence of learning, academic integrity, critical thinking, and information literacy A practical guide to teaching information literacy based on an increased focus on the learning process, an essential for Information literacy graduate students and higher education teaching staff in relevant fields

Improving How Universities Teach Science

Author: Carl Wieman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674978927
Size: 28.69 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Too many universities remain wedded to outmoded ways of teaching. Too few departments ask whether what happens in their lecture halls is effective at helping students to learn and how they can encourage their faculty to teach better. But real change is possible, and Carl Wieman shows us how it can be done—through detailed, tested strategies.

Science Education In The 21st Century

Author: Ingrid V. Eriksson
Publisher: Nova Publishers
ISBN: 9781600219511
Size: 44.29 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This is hardly another field in education which is more important for a country's future than science education. Yet more and more students elect to concentrate on other fields to the exclusion of science for a variety of reasons: 1. The perception of degree of difficulty, 2. The actual degree of difficulty, 3. The lack of perceived prestige and earnings associated with the field. 4. The dearth of good and easy to use texts. 5. The lack of society in comprehending the significance of science and creating attractive incentives for those who enter the field. This book presents new issues and challenges for the field.

Active Learning

Author: Dana E. Wright
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317588258
Size: 69.56 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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While many educators acknowledge the challenges of a curriculum shaped by test preparation, implementing meaningful new teaching strategies can be difficult. Active Learning presents an examination of innovative, interactive teaching strategies that were successful in engaging urban students who struggled with classroom learning. Drawing on rich ethnographic data, the book proposes participatory action research as a viable approach to teaching and learning that supports the development of multiple literacies in writing, reading, research and oral communication. As Wright argues, in connecting learning to authentic purposes and real world consequences, participatory action research can serve as a model for meaningful urban school reform. After an introduction to the history and demographics of the working-class West Coast neighborhood in which the described PAR project took place, the book discusses the "pedagogy of praxis" method and the project’s successful development of student voice, sociopolitical analysis capacities, leadership skills, empowerment and agency. Topics addressed include an analysis and discussion of the youth-driven PAR process, the reactions of student researchers, and the challenges for adults in maintaining youth and adult partnerships. A thought-provoking response to current educational challenges, Active Learning offers both timely implications for educational reform and recommendations to improve school policies and practices.

Teaching And Learning Stem

Author: Richard M. Felder
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118925823
Size: 70.72 MB
Format: PDF
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Rethink traditional teaching methods to improve student learning and retention in STEM Educational research has repeatedly shown that compared to traditional teacher-centered instruction, certain learner-centered methods lead to improved learning outcomes, greater development of critical high-level skills, and increased retention in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. Teaching and Learning STEM presents a trove of practical research-based strategies for designing and teaching courses and assessing students' learning. The book draws on the authors' extensive backgrounds and decades of experience in STEM education and faculty development. Its engaging and well-illustrated descriptions will equip you to implement the strategies in your courses and to deal effectively with problems (including student resistance) that might occur in the implementation. The book will help you: Plan and conduct class sessions in which students are actively engaged, no matter how large the class is Make good use of technology in face-to-face, online, and hybrid courses and flipped classrooms Assess how well students are acquiring the knowledge, skills, and conceptual understanding the course is designed to teach Help students develop expert problem-solving skills and skills in communication, creative thinking, critical thinking, high-performance teamwork, and self-directed learning Meet the learning needs of STEM students with a broad diversity of attributes and backgrounds The strategies presented in Teaching and Learning STEM don't require revolutionary time-intensive changes in your teaching, but rather a gradual integration of traditional and new methods. The result will be continual improvement in your teaching and your students' learning.

A Handbook For Teaching And Learning In Higher Education

Author: Heather Fry
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317650220
Size: 73.13 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This entirely new edition of a very successful book focuses on developing professional academic skills for supporting and supervising student learning and effective teaching. It is built on the premise that the roles of those who teach in higher education are complex and multi-faceted. A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education is sensitive to the competing demands of teaching, research, scholarship, and academic management. The new edition reflects and responds to the rapidly changing context of higher education and to current understanding of how to best support student learning. Drawing together a large number of expert authors, it continues to feature extensive use of case studies that show how successful teachers have implemented these ideas. It includes key topics such as student engagement and motivation, internationalisation, employability, inclusive strategies for teaching, effective use of technology and issues relating to postgraduate students and student retention. Part 1 explores a number of aspects of the context of UK higher education that affect the education of students, looking at the drivers of institutional behaviours and how to achieve success as a university teacher. Part 2 examines learning, teaching and supervising in higher education and includes chapters on working with diversity, encouraging independent learning and learning gain. Part 3 considers approaches to teaching and learning in different disciplines, covering a full range including arts and humanities, social sciences, experimental sciences through to medicine and dentistry. Written to support the excellence in teaching and learning design required to bring about student learning of the highest quality, this will be essential reading for all new lecturers, particularly anyone taking an accredited course in teaching and learning in higher education, as well as those experienced lecturers who wish to improve their teaching practice. Those working in adult learning and educational development will also find the book to be a particularly useful resource. In addition it will appeal to staff who support learning and teaching in various other roles.

How Students Learn

Author: Committee on How People Learn: A Targeted Report for Teachers
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309089506
Size: 53.97 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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How Students Learn: Science in the Classroom builds on the discoveries detailed in the best-selling How People Learn. Now these findings are presented in a way that teachers can use immediately, to revitalize their work in the classroom for even greater effectiveness. Organized for utility, the book explores how the principles of learning can be applied in science at three levels: elementary, middle, and high school. Leading educators explain in detail how they developed successful curricula and teaching approaches, presenting strategies that serve as models for curriculum development and classroom instruction. Their recounting of personal teaching experiences lends strength and warmth to this volume. This book discusses how to build straightforward science experiments into true understanding of scientific principles. It also features illustrated suggestions for classroom activities.