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Action Science

Author: William H. Robertson
Publisher: Corwin Press
ISBN: 1483339815
Size: 57.90 MB
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Put student engagement on the fast-track Think action sports like skateboarding and BMX have nothing to do with physical science? Think again, especially as they relate to fundamental physics concepts--not to mention the problem solving required. What’s more, because kids will want to, observing action sports is the perfect vehicle for promoting self-directed and collaborative learning . . . with Action Science as your driver’s manual. Through a combination of book and video, Robertson provides all the materials you’ll need to get started, with the NGSS very much in full view. You’ll find: Detailed instructional methods Hands-on classroom activities and experiments Captivating video via QR codes

How People Learn

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309131979
Size: 62.90 MB
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First released in the Spring of 1999, How People Learn has been expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods--to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. Topics include: How learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain. How existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn. What the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach. The amazing learning potential of infants. The relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace. Learning needs and opportunities for teachers. A realistic look at the role of technology in education.

Active Learning

Author: Charles C. Bonwell
Publisher: Jossey-Bass
ISBN: 9781878380081
Size: 38.73 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Presents active learning as a teaching method that results in greater student involvement and knowledge retention. Includes modifications to traditional lectures, alternative lecture formats, challenges in active learning, practical strategies, and more.

Inquiry And The National Science Education Standards

Author: Committee on the Development of an Addendum to the National Science Education Standards on Scientific Inquiry
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309064767
Size: 25.27 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Humans, especially children, are naturally curious. Yet, people often balk at the thought of learning science--the "eyes glazed over" syndrome. Teachers may find teaching science a major challenge in an era when science ranges from the hardly imaginable quark to the distant, blazing quasar. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards is the book that educators have been waiting for--a practical guide to teaching inquiry and teaching through inquiry, as recommended by the National Science Education Standards. This will be an important resource for educators who must help school boards, parents, and teachers understand "why we can't teach the way we used to." "Inquiry" refers to the diverse ways in which scientists study the natural world and in which students grasp science knowledge and the methods by which that knowledge is produced. This book explains and illustrates how inquiry helps students learn science content, master how to do science, and understand the nature of science. This book explores the dimensions of teaching and learning science as inquiry for K-12 students across a range of science topics. Detailed examples help clarify when teachers should use the inquiry-based approach and how much structure, guidance, and coaching they should provide. The book dispels myths that may have discouraged educators from the inquiry-based approach and illuminates the subtle interplay between concepts, processes, and science as it is experienced in the classroom. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards shows how to bring the standards to life, with features such as classroom vignettes exploring different kinds of inquiries for elementary, middle, and high school and Frequently Asked Questions for teachers, responding to common concerns such as obtaining teaching supplies. Turning to assessment, the committee discusses why assessment is important, looks at existing schemes and formats, and addresses how to involve students in assessing their own learning achievements. In addition, this book discusses administrative assistance, communication with parents, appropriate teacher evaluation, and other avenues to promoting and supporting this new teaching paradigm.

Teaching Information Literacy In Higher Education

Author: Mariann Lokse
Publisher: Chandos Publishing
ISBN: 0081010052
Size: 69.31 MB
Format: PDF
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Why do we teach information literacy? This book argues that the main purpose of information literacy teaching in higher education is to enhance student learning. With the impact of new technologies, a proliferation of information sources and a change in the student demography, information literacy has become increasingly important in academia. Also, students that know how to learn have a better chance of adapting their learning strategies to the demands of higher education, and thus completing their degree. The authors discuss the various aspects of how academic integrity and information literacy are linked to learning, and provide examples on how our theories can be put into practice. The book also provides insight on the normative side of higher education, namely academic formation and the personal development process of students. The cognitive aspects of the transition to higher education, including learning strategies and critical thinking, are explored; and finally the book asks how information literacy teaching in higher education might be improved to help students meet contemporary challenges. Presents critical thinking and learning strategies as a basic foundation for information literacy Covers information literacy as a way into deep learning/higher order thinking Provides self-regulation, motivation, and self-respect as tools in learning Emphasizes the interdependence of learning, academic integrity, critical thinking, and information literacy A practical guide to teaching information literacy based on an increased focus on the learning process, an essential for Information literacy graduate students and higher education teaching staff in relevant fields

Mathematics Teacher Noticing

Author: Miriam Sherin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136838260
Size: 43.64 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2015
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Mathematics Teacher Noticing is the first book to examine research on the particular type of noticing done by teachers---how teachers pay attention to and make sense of what happens in the complexity of instructional situations. In the midst of all that is happening in a classroom, where do mathematics teachers look, what do they see, and what sense do they make of it? This groundbreaking collection begins with an overview of the construct of noticing and the various historical, theoretical, and methodological perspectives on teacher noticing. It then focuses on studies of mathematics teacher noticing in the context of teaching and learning and concludes by suggesting links to other constructs integral to teaching. By collecting the work of leaders in the field in one volume, the editors present the current state of research and provide ideas for how future work could further the field.

Improving How Universities Teach Science

Author: Carl Wieman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674978927
Size: 68.55 MB
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Too many universities remain wedded to outmoded ways of teaching. Too few departments ask whether what happens in their lecture halls is effective at helping students to learn and how they can encourage their faculty to teach better. But real change is possible, and Carl Wieman shows us how it can be done—through detailed, tested strategies.

Active Learning Strategies In Higher Education

Author: Anastasia Misseyanni
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 1787144887
Size: 15.64 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book focuses on selected best practices for effective active learning in Higher Education. Contributors present the epistemology of active learning along with specific case studies from different disciplines and countries. Discussing issues around ICTs, collaborative learning, experiential learning and other active learning strategies.

Science Education In The 21st Century

Author: Ingrid V. Eriksson
Publisher: Nova Publishers
ISBN: 9781600219511
Size: 66.69 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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This is hardly another field in education which is more important for a country's future than science education. Yet more and more students elect to concentrate on other fields to the exclusion of science for a variety of reasons: 1. The perception of degree of difficulty, 2. The actual degree of difficulty, 3. The lack of perceived prestige and earnings associated with the field. 4. The dearth of good and easy to use texts. 5. The lack of society in comprehending the significance of science and creating attractive incentives for those who enter the field. This book presents new issues and challenges for the field.

Scientific Teaching

Author: Jo Handelsman
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9781429201889
Size: 39.62 MB
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Seasoned classroom veterans, pre-tenured faculty, and neophyte teaching assistants alike will find this book invaluable. HHMI Professor Jo Handelsman and her colleagues at the Wisconsin Program for Scientific Teaching (WPST) have distilled key findings from education, learning, and cognitive psychology and translated them into six chapters of digestible research points and practical classroom examples. The recommendations have been tried and tested in the National Academies Summer Institute on Undergraduate Education in Biology and through the WPST. Scientific Teaching is not a prescription for better teaching. Rather, it encourages the reader to approach teaching in a way that captures the spirit and rigor of scientific research and to contribute to transforming how students learn science.