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Administrative Justice In The United States

Author: Peter L. Strauss
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781611636567
Size: 34.48 MB
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The noted Administrative Law scholar Professor Peter L. Strauss of Columbia Law School has now completed the Third Edition of his Administrative Justice in the United States, addressing the issues of administrative law in ways that should be helpful both to foreign lawyers wishing a detailed introduction to American public law and to American lawyers and law students who must deal with the subject. Building on the well regarded Second Edition of 2002, this edition captures the developments of the past fifteen years, with particular attention to the impacts of the digital age. ''Professor Strauss's Third Edition of Administrative Justice is a marvelous achievement¿a master class in the law and structural principles that constitute our current government. One hears Professor Strauss's voice throughout, wisely guiding the reader to see how public law structures and doctrines fit together and the tensions they hold. The book's sweeping coverage combined with the extensive updating provides a comprehensive portrait of public law in the United States today and at the same time exposes the limits of law in structuring our government. The book will be an invaluable resource not only to scholars, students, and readers seeking to understand our administrative and constitutional law tradition, but also to comparative law scholars looking for a comprehensive and engaging account.'' ¿ Kevin M. Stack, Professor of Law, Vanderbilt Law School

Administrative Justice And The Supremacy Of Law In The United States

Author: John Dickinson
Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.
ISBN: 1584772735
Size: 35.40 MB
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Dickinson [1894-1952] examines the relationship between administrative tribunals and the courts, and problems that arise from the judicial review of administrative determinations. Dickinson is especially concerned with factors that determine the scope and purposes of a review. His study is notable in part because it offers a near-contemporary assessment of the Hepburn amendments to the Interstate Commerce Act (1906) and other changes enacted in the early 1900s.

Let Me Be A Refugee

Author: Rebecca Hamlin
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199373329
Size: 79.36 MB
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International law provides states with a common definition of a "refugee" as well as guidelines outlining how asylum claims should be decided. Yet even across nations with many commonalities, the processes of determining refugee status look strikingly different. This book compares the refugee status determination (RSD) regimes of three popular asylum seeker destinations: the United States, Canada, and Australia. Though they exhibit similarly high levels of political resistance to accepting asylum seekers, refugees access three very different systems-none of which are totally restrictive or expansive-once across their borders. These differences are significant both in terms of asylum seekers' experience of the process and in terms of their likelihood of being designated as refugees. Based on a multi-method analysis of all three countries, including a year of fieldwork with in-depth interviews of policy-makers and asylum-seeker advocates, observations of refugee status determination hearings, and a large-scale case analysis, Rebecca Hamlin finds that cross-national differences have less to do with political debates over admission and border control policy than with how insulated administrative decision-making is from either political interference or judicial review. Administrative justice is conceptualized and organized differently in every state, and so states vary in how they draw the line between refugee and non-refugee.

The Constitution And The Future Of Criminal Justice In America

Author: John T. Parry
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107434068
Size: 16.44 MB
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The Constitution and the Future of Criminal Justice in America brings together leading scholars from law, psychology and criminology to address timely and important topics in US criminal justice. The book tackles cutting-edge issues related to terrorism, immigration and transnational crime, and to the increasingly important connections between criminal law and the fields of social science and neuroscience. It also provides critical new perspectives on intractable problems such as the right to counsel, race and policing, and the proper balance between security and privacy. By putting legal theory and doctrine into a concrete and accessible context, the book will advance public policy and scholarly debates alike. This collection of essays is appropriate for anyone interested in understanding the current state of criminal justice and its future challenges.

Strengthening The National Institute Of Justice

Author: Committee on Assessing the Research Program of the National Institute of Justice
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309156351
Size: 58.14 MB
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The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is the nation's primary resource for advancing scientific research, development, and evaluation on crime and crime control and the administration of justice in the United States. Headed by a presidentially appointed director, it is one of the major units in the Office of Justice Programs (OJP) of the U.S. Department of Justice. Under its authorizing legislation, NIJ awards grants and contracts to a variety of public and private organizations and individuals. At the request of NIJ, Strengthening the National Institute of Justice assesses the operations and quality of the full range of its programs. These include social science research, science and technology research and development, capacity building, and technology assistance. The book concludes that a federal research institute such as NIJ is vital to the nation's continuing efforts to control crime and administer justice. No other federal, state, local, or private organization can do what NIJ was created to do. Forty years ago, Congress envisioned a science agency dedicated to building knowledge to support crime prevention and control by developing a wide range of techniques for dealing with individual offenders, identifying injustices and biases in the administration of justice, and supporting more basic and operational research on crime and the criminal justice system and the involvement of the community in crime control efforts. As the embodiment of that vision, NIJ has accomplished a great deal. It has succeeded in developing a body of knowledge on such important topics as hot spots policing, violence against women, the role of firearms and drugs in crime, drug courts, and forensic DNA analysis. It has helped build the crime and justice research infrastructure. It has also widely disseminated the results of its research programs to help guide practice and policy. But its efforts have been severely hampered by a lack of independence, authority, and discretionary resources to carry out its mission.

Responsive Legality

Author: Zach Richards
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0429953054
Size: 12.42 MB
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Responsive Legality is an important book about twenty first century justice. It explores the legal and moral values that twenty-first-century public officials use to make their decisions, engaging existing theoretical models of administrative justice and updating them to reflect changed twenty-first-century conditions. Together, these features of twenty-first century public administration are coined ‘responsive legality’. Whereas twentieth-century public officials were generally driven by their concern for bureaucratic rationality, professional treatment, moral judgement and – towards the end of the century – the logics of ‘new managerialism’, the twenty-first-century public official embodies greater complexity in their characteristic pursuit of substantive and procedural justice. In responsive legality, government decision makers show a distinct concern for the protective parameters of the rule of law, a purposive pursuit of fair outcomes and a commitment to flexible decision making.