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Afghan Modern

Author: Robert D. Crews
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674495764
Size: 49.93 MB
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Rugged, remote, riven by tribal rivalries and religious violence, Afghanistan seems to many a forsaken country frozen in time. Robert Crews presents a bold challenge to this misperception. During their long history, Afghans have engaged and connected with a wider world, occupying a pivotal position in the Cold War and the decades that followed.

The History Of Afghanistan

Author: Meredith L. Runion
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313337987
Size: 50.65 MB
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Provides general readers and students with an understanding of one of the most controversial nations in the contemporary world.

Under The Drones

Author: Shahzad Bashir
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674064763
Size: 24.79 MB
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Western media coverage of Afghanistan and Pakistan paints a simplistic picture of ageless barbarity, terrorist safe havens, and peoples in need of either punishment or salvation. Under the Drones looks beyond this limiting view to investigate real people on the ground, and analyze the political, social, and economic forces that shape their lives.

Speaking Soviet With An Accent

Author: Ali Igmen
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre
ISBN: 0822978091
Size: 27.95 MB
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Speaking Soviet with an Accent presents the first English-language study of Soviet culture clubs in Kyrgyzstan. These clubs profoundly influenced the future of Kyrgyz cultural identity and fostered the work of many artists, such as famed novelist Chingiz Aitmatov. Based on extensive oral history and archival research, Ali Igmen follows the rise of culture clubs beginning in the 1920s, when they were established to inculcate Soviet ideology and create a sedentary lifestyle among the historically nomadic Kyrgyz people. These “Red clubs” are fondly remembered by locals as one of the few places where lively activities and socialization with other members of their ail (village or tribal unit) could be found. Through lectures, readings, books, plays, concerts, operas, visual arts, and cultural Olympiads, locals were exposed to Soviet notions of modernization. But these programs also encouraged the creation of a newfound “Kyrgyzness” that preserved aspects of local traditions and celebrated the achievements of Kyrgyz citizens in the building of a new state. These ideals proved appealing to many Kyrgyz, who, for centuries, had seen riches and power in the hands of a few tribal chieftains and Russian imperialists. This book offers new insights into the formation of modern cultural identity in Central Asia. Here, like their imperial predecessors, the Soviets sought to extend their physical borders and political influence. But Igmen also reveals the remarkable agency of the Kyrgyz people, who employed available resources to meld their own heritage with Soviet and Russian ideologies and form artistic expressions that continue to influence Kyrgyzstan today.

The Origins Of The Modern World

Author: Robert Marks
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 074255418X
Size: 57.10 MB
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This volume presents a global narrative of the origins of the modern world. Unlike most studies, which assume that the rise of the West is the story of the coming of the modern world, this history accords importance to the 'underdeveloped world'.

Afghanistan S Islam

Author: Nile Green
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520294130
Size: 27.28 MB
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"This book provides the first ever overview of the history and development of Islam in Afghanistan. It covers every era from the conversion of Afghanistan through the medieval and early modern periods to the present day. Based on primary sources in Arabic, Persian, Pashto, Urdu and Uzbek, its depth and scope of coverage is unrivalled by any existing publication on Afghanistan. As well as state-sponsored religion, the chapters cover such issues as the rise of Sufism, Sharia, women's religiosity, transnational Islamism and the Taliban. Islam has been one of the most influential social and political forces in Afghan history. Providing idioms and organizations for both anti-state and anti-foreign mobilization, Islam has proven to be a vital socio-political resource in modern Afghanistan. Even as it has been deployed as the national cement of a multi-ethnic 'Emirate' and then 'Islamic Republic,' Islam has been no less a destabilizing force in dividing Afghan society. Yet despite the universal scholarly recognition of the centrality of Islam to Afghan history, its developmental trajectories have received relatively little sustained attention outside monographs and essays devoted to particular moments or movements. To help develop a more comprehensive, comparative and developmental picture of Afghanistan's Islam from the eighth century to the present, this edited volume brings together specialists on different periods, regions and languages. Each chapter forms a case study 'snapshot' of the Islamic beliefs, practices, institutions and authorities of a particular time and place in Afghanistan"--Provided by publishe

Losing Afghanistan

Author: Noah Coburn
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804797803
Size: 12.92 MB
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The U.S.-led intervention in Afghanistan mobilized troops, funds, and people on an international level not seen since World War II. Hundreds of thousands of individuals and tens of billions of dollars flowed into the country. But what was gained for Afghanistan—or for the international community that footed the bill? Why did development money not lead to more development? Why did a military presence make things more dangerous? Through the stories of four individuals—an ambassador, a Navy SEAL, a young Afghan businessman, and a wind energy engineer—Noah Coburn weaves a vivid account of the challenges and contradictions of life during the intervention. Looking particularly at the communities around Bagram Airbase, this ethnography considers how Afghans viewed and attempted to use the intervention and how those at the base tried to understand the communities around them. These compelling stories step outside the tired paradigms of 'unruly' Afghan tribes, an effective Taliban resistance, and a corrupt Karzai government to show how the intervention became an entity unto itself, one doomed to collapse under the weight of its own bureaucracy and contradictory intentions.

Killing The Cranes

Author: Edward Girardet
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing
ISBN: 1603583181
Size: 24.68 MB
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Chronicles the country's wars that began with the Soviet invasion of 1970, discussing the reasons for the failure of the Western powers to establish a stable governement and the consequences the wars have had for the native population.

A Military History Of Afghanistan

Author: Ali Ahmad Jalali
Publisher: Modern War Studies (Hardcover)
ISBN: 9780700624072
Size: 41.90 MB
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The first comprehensive history of over two centuries of warfare and international conflict in Afghanistan, including the Anglo-Afghan wars of the nineteenth century, the early twentieth century struggles over modernization, the fall of the last monarchy, the Soviet-Afghan War, and the twenty-first century US Global War on Terror.