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Ambiguity And Choice In Public Policy

Author: Nikolaos Zahariadis
Publisher: Georgetown University Press
ISBN: 9781589012363
Size: 12.82 MB
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Zahariadis offers a theory that explains policymaking when "ambiguity" is present—a state in which there are many ways, often irreconcilable, of thinking about an issue. Expanding and extending John Kingdon's influential "multiple streams" model that explains agenda setting, Zahariadis argues that manipulation, the bending of ideas, process, and beliefs to get what you want out of the policy process, is the key to understanding the dynamics of policymaking in conditions of ambiguity. He takes one of the major theories of public policy to the next step in three different ways: he extends it to a different form of government (parliamentary democracies, where Kingdon looked only at what he called the United States's presidential "organized anarchy" form of government); he examines the entire policy formation process, not just agenda setting; and he applies it to foreign as well as domestic policy. This book combines theory with cases to illuminate policymaking in a variety of modern democracies. The cases cover economic policymaking in Britain, France, and Germany, foreign policymaking in Greece, all compared to the U.S. (where the model was first developed), and an innovative computer simulation of the policy process.

Ambiguity And Choice In Public Policy

Author: Nikolaos Zahariadis
Publisher: American Governance and Public
ISBN: 9780878401352
Size: 19.28 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 6197
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Zahariadis offers a theory that explains policymaking when "ambiguity" is present--a state in which there are many ways, often irreconcilable, of thinking about an issue. Expanding and extending John Kingdon's influential "multiple streams" model that explains agenda setting, Zahariadis argues that manipulation, the bending of ideas, process, and beliefs to get what you want out of the policy process, is the key to understanding the dynamics of policymaking in conditions of ambiguity. He takes one of the major theories of public policy to the next step in three different ways: he extends it to a different form of government (parliamentary democracies, where Kingdon looked only at what he called the United States's presidential "organized anarchy" form of government); he examines the entire policy formation process, not just agenda setting; and he applies it to foreign as well as domestic policy. This book combines theory with cases to illuminate policymaking in a variety of modern democracies. The cases cover economic policymaking in Britain, France, and Germany, foreign policymaking in Greece, all compared to the U.S. (where the model was first developed), and an innovative computer simulation of the policy process.

Refugee Law In India

Author: Shuvro Prosun Sarker
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 981104807X
Size: 15.37 MB
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This book considers refugee protection mandates and addresses how legal scholarship can articulate a comprehensive and humane response to the contemporary refugee problem. Analyzing philosophical discourses and India’s policies and practices on refugee protection, including judgments of Indian Courts in refugee related cases, it examines how organizational efforts can make these policies and practices equal for every refugee in India. It also surveys prevailing discriminative protection standards and entitlements developed through Conventions, Declaration and Directives, and compares and contrasts national refugee legislations in South Africa, Brazil and Canada. A key read for scholars and practitioners interested in the legal and policy implications of refugee protection, this text identifies various practices of nation-States from across the North/South divide and provides key insights into the evolving nature of protection agendas.

Public Policy In An Uncertain World

Author: Charles F. Manski
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674067541
Size: 34.32 MB
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Manski argues that public policy is based on untrustworthy analysis. Failing to account for uncertainty in an uncertain world, policy analysis routinely misleads policy makers with expressions of certitude. Manski critiques the status quo and offers an innovation to improve both how policy research is conducted and how it is used by policy makers.

Theories Of The Policy Process

Author: Paul A. Sabatier
Publisher: Westview Press
ISBN: 0813349273
Size: 57.42 MB
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Theories of the Policy Process provides a forum for the experts in the most established and widely used theoretical frameworks in policy process research to present the basic propositions, empirical evidence, latest updates, and the promising future research opportunities of each framework. This well-regarded volume covers such enduring classics as Multiple Streams (Zahariadis et al.), Punctuated Equilibrium (Jones et al.), Advocacy Coalition Framework (Jenkins-Smith et al.), Institutional Analysis and Development Framework (Schlager and Cox), and Policy Diffusion (Berry and Berry), as well as two newer theories-Policy Feedback (Mettler and SoRelle) and Narrative Policy Framework (McBeth et al.). The fourth edition now includes a discussion of global and comparative perspectives in each theoretical chapter and a brand-new chapter that explores how these theories have been adapted for, and employed in, non-American and non-Western contexts. An expanded introduction and revised conclusion fully examines and contextualizes the history, trajectories and functions of public policy research. Since its first publication in 1999, Theories of the Policy Process has been, and remains, the quintessential gateway to the field of policy process research for students, scholars and practitioners.

Encyclopedia Of Public Administration And Public Policy K Z

Author: Jack Rabin
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 9780824742997
Size: 51.20 MB
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From the Nuremberg trials to the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 to recent budget reconciliation bills, the Encyclopedia of Public Administration and Public Policy provides detailed coverage of watershed policies and decisions from such fields as privatization, biomedical ethics, education, and diversity. This second edition features a wide range of new topics, including military administration, government procurement, social theory, and justice administration in developed democracies. It also addresses current issues such as the creation of the Department of Homeland Security and covers public administration in the Middle East, Africa, Southeast Asia, the Pacific, and Latin America.

Creating And Implementing Public Policy

Author: Gemma Carey
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317615794
Size: 35.26 MB
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In order to address major social policy problems, governments need to break down sectoral barriers and create better working relationships between practitioners, policymakers and researchers. Currently, major blockages exist, and stereotypes abound. Academics are seen as out-of-touch and unresponsive, policymakers are perceived to be justifying policy decisions, and the community sector seeks more funding without demonstrating efficacy. These stereotypes are born out of a lack of understanding of the work and practices that exist across these three sectors. Drawing on ground-breaking research and partnerships, with contributions from senior public servants, this book explores the competing demands of different actors involved in policy change. It challenges current debates, assumptions and reflects a unique diversity of experiences. Combined with differing theoretical perspectives, it provides a uniquely practical insight for those seeking to influence public policy. This innovative text provides essential reading for community sector practitioners, academics and advanced level students in public policy, social policy and public administration, as well as for public service professionals.

Identification For Prediction And Decision

Author: Charles F. Manski
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674033665
Size: 44.60 MB
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This book is a full-scale exposition of Charles Manski's new methodology for analyzing empirical questions in the social sciences. He recommends that researchers first ask what can be learned from data alone, and then ask what can be learned when data are combined with credible weak assumptions. Inferences predicated on weak assumptions, he argues, can achieve wide consensus, while ones that require strong assumptions almost inevitably are subject to sharp disagreements. Building on the foundation laid in the author's "Identification Problems in the Social Sciences" (Harvard, 1995), the book's fifteen chapters are organized in three parts. Part I studies prediction with missing or otherwise incomplete data. Part II concerns the analysis of treatment response, which aims to predict outcomes when alternative treatment rules are applied to a population. Part III studies prediction of choice behavior. Each chapter juxtaposes developments of methodology with empirical or numerical illustrations. The book employs a simple notation and mathematical apparatus, using only basic elements of probability theory.

The Politics Of Evidence Based Policy Making

Author: Paul Cairney
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137517816
Size: 65.45 MB
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The Politics of Evidence Based Policymaking identifies how to work with policymakers to maximize the use of scientific evidence. Policymakers cannot consider all evidence relevant to policy problems. They use two shortcuts: ‘rational’ ways to gather enough evidence, and ‘irrational’ decision-making, drawing on emotions, beliefs, and habits. Most scientific studies focus on the former. They identify uncertainty when policymakers have incomplete evidence, and try to solve it by improving the supply of information. They do not respond to ambiguity, or the potential for policymakers to understand problems in very different ways. A good strategy requires advocates to be persuasive: forming coalitions with like-minded actors, and accompanying evidence with simple stories to exploit the emotional or ideological biases of policymakers.