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American Courts Process And Policy

Author: Lawrence Baum
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 0495916374
Size: 58.20 MB
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The highly respected AMERICAN COURTS: PROCESS AND POLICY, by top Courts scholar Lawrence Baum, provides clear descriptions of the courts and the activities of the various courts. The Seventh Edition explains what courts do, how people within them behave, and how they relate to the rest of the political system. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

May It Please The Court

Author: Brian L. Porto
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 1420067699
Size: 35.75 MB
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Despite their clarity and sophistication, most judicial process texts currently available have two significant limitations. First, they understate the effects of legal factors such as stare decisis on judicial decision-making and second, they fail to convey the human emotions involved in litigation. Reflecting the author’s experience as a political scientist, law student, judicial clerk, practicing attorney, and law professor, May It Please the Court: Judicial Processes and Politics in America, Second Edition redresses this imbalance by giving well-deserved attention to legal influences on judicial decisions and to the human drama of litigation. Each chapter reflects the book’s premise that the judicial process operates at the intersection of law and politics, and this theme guides the discussions. The coverage in the book is far-reaching, exploring numerous topics, including the structure of federal and state courts, the selection and removal of judges, and the legal profession’s history and culture. It discusses two hypothetical cases, outlining their trial and appellate proceedings. It also presents an engaging debate about the legitimacy and the utility of judicial policy making. New to this edition: Expanded appendices, including a discussion of computerized legal research New illustrative cases, documents, and web references All chapters updated to reflect changes since the first publication in 2001 The final chapter summarizes the theme of the book, noting that courts not only enforce norms and resolve disputes, but also, as a coequal branch of government, shape the fundamental power relationships that drive American politics. The chapter ends by observing that the judicial process offers a window on the entire American political system. This book clarifies the view from that window.

The American Courts A Procedural Approach

Author: Jeffrey A. Jenkins
Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Publishers
ISBN: 1449644503
Size: 80.68 MB
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Courtrooms are often lively places, and what occurs in them has a profound impact on the functioning of our democracy. The American Courts A Procedural Approach offers readers a thorough understanding of the United States court system by exploring the procedural aspects of the law. The rules of both criminal and civil procedure, how they are applied, and their influence on decision-making in the courts are thoroughly examined. This text is ideal for undergraduate and introductory graduate criminal justice, legal studies, and government programs."

Judicial Process Law Courts And Politics In The United States

Author: David W. Neubauer
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1305506529
Size: 45.76 MB
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Working within the framework of law and politics, JUDICIAL PROCESS: LAW, COURTS, AND POLITICS IN THE UNITED STATES combines detailed information about the major structures and processes of the American judiciary with an insider's understanding of the importance of courthouse dynamics. From the organization and procedures of the various courts to the current applications of specific laws, the 7th edition explores the roles and impact of the judicial system. Throughout the text, the authors not only explain what the legal rules are but also explore each rule's underlying assumptions, history, and goals, providing a complete and balanced look at the role of the judicial system today. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

The Supreme Court

Author: Lawrence Baum
Publisher: CQ-Roll Call Group Books
ISBN:
Size: 62.41 MB
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The Supreme Court provides a complete concise guide to how the Supreme Court operates today -- appropriate for all readers from novices to experts in the field. Baum examines how the Court determines which cases it accepts for decision, its decision-making process, the policies it makes, and the impact of its decisions on American society. This new edition highlights: the Court's move to the political center -- especially the influence of Breyer, Ginsburg and Souter; important trends in the Court's operations and decision making; and Web access to Court decisions.

Public Policy And Higher Education Strategies For Framing A Research Agenda

Author: Nicholas W Hillman
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119067707
Size: 77.35 MB
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Conducting “policy relevant” research remains elusive yet important since evidence-based policymaking results in better public policy decisions. But how can this be done? What are some promising practices to help make academic scholarship more policy relevant? This monograph provides strategies that—when addressed—should improve the chances of a study becoming relevant to policy audiences. It provides: practical examples, theoretical perspectives, discussions of key stakeholders, and promising research strategies for framing work in policy relevant ways. By being more intentional about the policy relevance of our work and connecting research with emerging policy debates, we can increase the likelihood that future policy solutions will be evidence-based and informed by the most recent and rigorous research in our field. This the 2nd issue of the 41st volume of the Jossey-Bass series ASHE Higher Education Report. Each monograph is the definitive analysis of a tough higher education issue, based on thorough research of pertinent literature and institutional experiences. Topics are identified by a national survey. Noted practitioners and scholars are then commissioned to write the reports, with experts providing critical reviews of each manuscript before publication.

The Challenge Of Democracy Government In America

Author: Kenneth Janda
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 061881017X
Size: 45.13 MB
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This best-selling, mainstream American government text is both a comprehensive introduction and a complete program, with the print text and ancillaries carefully crafted to work together to benefit both instructor and student. The Ninth Edition maintains its highly acclaimed, non-ideological framework, exploring three themes: freedom, order, and equality as political values; the majoritarianism vs. pluralism debate; and globalization's effect on American politics. Extensively updated, this edition includes new examples, figures, and data and current discussions on such topics as the 2006 Congressional election, the Bush administration, campaign finance reform, Hurricane Katrina and FEMA, immigration policy, MEDICARE, and more.Continuing to offer leading-edge technology for teaching and learning, the program now offers course content in Eduspace, Blackboard, and WebCT formats. Additional media tools include the new In Our Own Words feature--downloadable chapter overviews in MP3 format narrated by the authors--and marginal references to the award-winning site, IDEAlog.org. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Judging Policy

Author: Matthew M. Taylor
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804786798
Size: 48.42 MB
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Courts, like other government institutions, shape public policy. But how are courts drawn into the policy process, and how are patterns of policy debate shaped by the institutional structure of the courts? Drawing on the experience of the Brazilian federal courts since the transition to democracy, Judging Policy examines the judiciary's role in public policy debates. During a period of energetic policy reform, the high salience of many policies, combined with the conducive institutional structure of the judiciary, ensured that Brazilian courts would become an important institution at the heart of the policy process. The Brazilian case thus challenges the notion that Latin America's courts have been uniformly pliant or ineffectual, with little impact on politics and policy outcomes. Judging Policy also inserts the judiciary into the scholarly debate regarding the extent of presidential control of the policy process in Latin America's largest nation. By analyzing the full Brazilian federal court system—including not only the high court, but also trial and appellate courts—the book develops a framework with cross-national implications for understanding how courts may influence policy actors' political strategies and the distribution of power within political systems.

Courts And Social Policy

Author: Donald L. Horowitz
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 9780815707318
Size: 25.88 MB
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In recent years, the power of American judges to make social policy has been significantly broadened. The courts have reached into many matters once thought to be beyond the customary scope of judicial decisionmaking: education and employment policy, environmental issues, prison and hospital management, and welfare administration—to name a few. This new judicial activity can be traced to various sources, among them the emergence of public interest law firms and interest groups committed to social change through the courts, and to various changes in the law itself that have made access to the courts easier. The propensity for bringing difficult social questions to the judiciary for resolution is likely to persist. This book is the first comprehensive study of the capacity of courts to make and implement social policy. Donald L. Horowitz, a lawyer and social scientist, traces the imprint of the judicial process on the policies that emerge from it. He focuses on a number of important questions: how issues emerge in litigation, how courts obtain their information, how judges use social science data, how legal solutions to social problems are devised, and what happens to judge-made social policy after decrees leave the court house. After a general analysis of the adjudication process as it bears on social policymaking, the author presents four cases studies of litigation involving urban affairs, educational resources, juvenile courts and delinquency, and policy behavior. In each, the assumption and evidence with which the courts approached their policy problems are matched against data about the social settings from which the cases arose and the effects the decrees had. The concern throughout the book is to relate the policy process to the policy outcome. From his analysis of adjudication and the findings of his case studies the author concludes that the resources of the courts are not adequate to the new challenges confronting them. He suggests various improvements, but warns against changes that might impair the traditional strengths of the judicial process.