Download american horizons us history in a global context volume i to 1877 with sources in pdf or read american horizons us history in a global context volume i to 1877 with sources in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get american horizons us history in a global context volume i to 1877 with sources in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



American Horizons

Author: Michael Schaller
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780190659486
Size: 13.98 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 143
Download and Read
U.S. history is increasingly perceived, interpreted, and taught as part of a global historical experience. The mutual influence of change - of global forces entering the United States and of American ideas, goods, and people moving out through the world - has been a consistent feature sincethe 16th century. Although most Americans today are aware that their influence is felt abroad and are increasingly aware of the influence of events abroad on their own lives, they tend to think of these as recent developments. In fact, those earliest exchanges of beliefs and products some 500 yearsago established a pattern of interaction that continues today.American Horizons tells the story of the United States by exploring this exchange on a global scale and placing it at the center of that story. By doing so, the authors provide a different perspective on the history of the United States, one that they hope broadens the horizons of those who readtheir work and are ever mindful of the global forces that increasingly and profoundly shape their lives. At the same time, American Horizons considers those ways in which U.S. inlfuence reshaped their lives and experiences of people of other nations.American Horizons presents an opportunity to view the nation's history as more than a mere sequence of events for students to memorize. Although adhering to the familiar chronological organization of the U.S. History course, their narrative style and structure provide the flexibility of shiftingemphasis from time to time to the global aspects of American history. Although the story of the United States is always at the center, that story is told through the movement of people, goods, and ideas into, within, or out of the United States.

American Horizons

Author: Michael Schaller
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780190659493
Size: 51.52 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 868
Download and Read
U.S. history is increasingly perceived, interpreted, and taught as part of a global historical experience. The mutual influence of change - of global forces entering the United States and of American ideas, goods, and people moving out through the world - has been a consistent feature sincethe 16th century. Although most Americans today are aware that their influence is felt abroad and are increasingly aware of the influence of events abroad on their own lives, they tend to think of these as recent developments. In fact, those earliest exchanges of beliefs and products some 500 yearsago established a pattern of interaction that continues today.American Horizons tells the story of the United States by exploring this exchange on a global scale and placing it at the center of that story. By doing so, the authors provide a different perspective on the history of the United States, one that they hope broadens the horizons of those who readtheir work and are ever mindful of the global forces that increasingly and profoundly shape their lives. At the same time, American Horizons considers those ways in which U.S. inlfuence reshaped their lives and experiences of people of other nations.American Horizons presents an opportunity to view the nation's history as more than a mere sequence of events for students to memorize. Although adhering to the familiar chronological organization of the U.S. History course, their narrative style and structure provide the flexibility of shiftingemphasis from time to time to the global aspects of American history. Although the story of the United States is always at the center, that story is told through the movement of people, goods, and ideas into, within, or out of the United States.

American Horizons

Author: Michael Schaller
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780199389360
Size: 72.88 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 3254
Download and Read
American Horizons, Second Edition, is the only U.S. History survey text that presents the traditional narrative in a global context. The authors use the frequent movement of people, goods, and ideas into, out of, and within America's borders as a framework. This unique approach provides a fully integrated global perspective that seamlessly contextualizes American events within the wider world. The authors, all acclaimed scholars in their specialties, use their individual strengths to provide students with a balanced and inclusive account of U.S. history. Presented in two volumes for maximum flexibility, American Horizons, Second Edition, illustrates the relevance of U.S. history to American students by centering on the matrix of issues that dominate their lives. These touchstone themes include population movements and growth, the evolving definition of citizenship, cultural change and continuity, people's relationship to and impact upon the environment, political and ideological contests and their consequences, and Americans' five centuries of engagement with regional, national, and global institutions, forces, and events. In addition, this beautifully designed, full-color book features hundreds of photos and images and more than 100 maps.

Reading American Horizons

Author: Michael Schaller
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780199768509
Size: 62.90 MB
Format: PDF
View: 3215
Download and Read
This unique two-volume primary source collection, expertly edited by the authors of American Horizons, provides a diverse set of documents that situate U.S. history within a global context. Covering political, social, and cultural history, the nearly 200 selections--including many visual documents--will spark discussion in the classroom and give students a deeper understanding of America's history. Reading American Horizons includes solid pedagogy, like headnotes and discussion questions, to make the documents more accessible to students. Buy a Bundle to Save a Bundle! Reading American Horizons is just $5 when packaged with American Horizons or American Horizons Concise. For more information on packaging options or package ISBNs, please contact your Oxford University Press representative or call 800.280.0280.

History Wars

Author: Edward T. Linethal
Publisher: Holt Paperbacks
ISBN: 9781429936774
Size: 66.21 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 5808
Download and Read
From the "taming of the West" to the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, the portrayal of the past has become a battleground at the heart of American politics. What kind of history Americans should read, see, or fund is no longer merely a matter of professional interest to teachers, historians, and museum curators. Everywhere now, history is increasingly being held hostage, but to what end and why? In History Wars, eight prominent historians consider the angry swirl of emotions that now surrounds public memory. Included are trenchant essays by Paul Boyer, John W. Dower, Tom Engelhardt, Richard H. Kohn, Edward Linenthal, Micahel S. Sherry, Marilyn B. Young, and Mike Wallace.

A Short Offhand Killing Affair

Author: Paul Foos
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807862001
Size: 76.53 MB
Format: PDF
View: 561
Download and Read
The Mexican-American War (1846-48) found Americans on new terrain. A republic founded on the principle of armed defense of freedom was now going to war on behalf of Manifest Destiny, seeking to conquer an unfamiliar nation and people. Through an examination of rank-and-file soldiers, Paul Foos sheds new light on the war and its effect on attitudes toward other races and nationalities that stood in the way of American expansionism. Drawing on wartime diaries and letters not previously examined by scholars, Foos shows that the experience of soldiers in the war differed radically from the positive, patriotic image trumpeted by political and military leaders seeking recruits for a volunteer army. Promised access to land, economic opportunity, and political equality, the enlistees instead found themselves subjected to unusually harsh discipline and harrowing battle conditions. As a result, some soldiers adapted the rhetoric of Manifest Destiny to their own purposes, taking for themselves what had been promised, often by looting the Mexican countryside or committing racial and sexual atrocities. Others deserted the army to fight for the enemy or seek employment in the West. These acts, Foos argues, along with the government's tacit acceptance of them, translated into a more violent, damaging variety of Manifest Destiny.

The Postal Age

Author: David M. Henkin
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226327221
Size: 26.36 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 2944
Download and Read
Americans commonly recognize television, e-mail, and instant messaging as agents of pervasive cultural change. But many of us may not realize that what we now call snail mail was once just as revolutionary. As David M. Henkin argues in The Postal Age, a burgeoning postal network initiated major cultural shifts during the nineteenth century, laying the foundation for the interconnectedness that now defines our ever-evolving world of telecommunications. This fascinating history traces these shifts from their beginnings in the mid-1800s, when cheaper postage, mass literacy, and migration combined to make the long-established postal service a more integral and viable part of everyday life. With such dramatic events as the Civil War and the gold rush underscoring the importance and necessity of the post, a surprisingly broad range of Americans—male and female, black and white, native-born and immigrant—joined this postal network, regularly interacting with distant locales before the existence of telephones or even the widespread use of telegraphy. Drawing on original letters and diaries from the period, as well as public discussions of the expanding postal system, Henkin tells the story of how these Americans adjusted to a new world of long-distance correspondence, crowded post offices, junk mail, valentines, and dead letters. The Postal Age paints a vibrant picture of a society where possibilities proliferated for the kinds of personal and impersonal communications that we often associate with more recent historical periods. In doing so, it significantly increases our understanding of both antebellum America and our own chapter in the history of communications.

The Fall Of The House Of Dixie

Author: Bruce Levine
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 0679645357
Size: 67.85 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 5544
Download and Read
In this major new history of the Civil War, Bruce Levine tells the riveting story of how that conflict upended the economic, political, and social life of the old South, utterly destroying the Confederacy and the society it represented and defended. Told through the words of the people who lived it, The Fall of the House of Dixie illuminates the way a war undertaken to preserve the status quo became a second American Revolution whose impact on the country was as strong and lasting as that of our first. In 1860 the American South was a vast, wealthy, imposing region where a small minority had amassed great political power and enormous fortunes through a system of forced labor. The South’s large population of slaveless whites almost universally supported the basic interests of plantation owners, despite the huge wealth gap that separated them. By the end of 1865 these structures of wealth and power had been shattered. Millions of black people had gained their freedom, many poorer whites had ceased following their wealthy neighbors, and plantation owners were brought to their knees, losing not only their slaves but their political power, their worldview, their very way of life. This sea change was felt nationwide, as the balance of power in Congress, the judiciary, and the presidency shifted dramatically and lastingly toward the North, and the country embarked on a course toward equal rights. Levine captures the many-sided human drama of this story using a huge trove of diaries, letters, newspaper articles, government documents, and more. In The Fall of the House of Dixie, the true stakes of the Civil War become clearer than ever before, as slaves battle for their freedom in the face of brutal reprisals; Abraham Lincoln and his party turn what began as a limited war for the Union into a crusade against slavery by issuing the Emancipation Proclamation; poor southern whites grow increasingly disillusioned with fighting what they have come to see as the plantation owners’ war; and the slave owners grow ever more desperate as their beloved social order is destroyed, not just by the Union Army, but also from within. When the smoke clears, not only Dixie but all of American society is changed forever. Brilliantly argued and engrossing, The Fall of the House of Dixie is a sweeping account of the destruction of the old South during the Civil War, offering a fresh perspective on the most colossal struggle in our history and the new world it brought into being. Praise for The Fall of the House of Dixie “This is the Civil War as it is seldom seen. . . . A portrait of a country in transition . . . as vivid as any that has been written.”—The Boston Globe “An absorbing social history . . . For readers whose Civil War bibliography runs to standard works by Bruce Catton and James McPherson, [Bruce] Levine’s book offers fresh insights.”—The Wall Street Journal “More poignantly than any book before, The Fall of the House of Dixie shows how deeply intertwined the Confederacy was with slavery, and how the destruction of both made possible a ‘second American revolution’ as far-reaching as the first.”—David W. Blight, author of American Oracle “Splendidly colorful . . . Levine recounts this tale of Southern institutional rot with the ease and authority born of decades of study.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review) “A deep, rich, and complex analysis of the period surrounding and including the American Civil War.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

American Horizons

Author: Michael Schaller
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780190268442
Size: 19.84 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 2646
Download and Read
American Horizons, Second Edition, is the only U.S. History survey text that presents the traditional narrative in a global context. The authors use the frequent movement of people, goods, and ideas into, out of, and within America's borders as a framework. This unique approach provides a fully integrated global perspective that seamlessly contextualizes American events within the wider world. The authors, all acclaimed scholars in their specialties, use their individual strengths to provide students with a balanced and inclusive account of U.S. history. Presented in two volumes for maximum flexibility, American Horizons, Second Edition, illustrates the relevance of U.S. history to American students by centering on the matrix of issues that dominate their lives. These touchstone themes include population movements and growth, the evolving definition of citizenship, cultural change and continuity, people's relationship to and impact upon the environment, political and ideological contests and their consequences, and Americans' five centuries of engagement with regional, national, and global institutions, forces, and events. In addition, this beautifully designed, full-color book features hundreds of photos and images and more than 100 maps.