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American Indian Law

Author: Bethany Berger
Publisher: West Academic Publishing
ISBN: 9780314290236
Size: 36.43 MB
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This casebook provides an introduction to the legal relationships between American Indian tribes, the federal government, individual states, and others. The foundational cases are incorporated with statutory text, background material, hypothetical questions, and discussion problems to structure the classroom experience and enhance student engagement. Historical materials are explained to highlight their modern relevance. The third edition includes expanded materials on law and order within Indian country, the Indian Child Welfare Act, and recent Executive Branch actions that increase tribal authority.

Alaska Natives And American Laws

Author: David S. Case
Publisher: University of Alaska Press
ISBN: 1602231761
Size: 14.37 MB
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Now in its third edition, Alaska Natives and American Laws is still the only work of its kind, canvassing federal law and its history as applied to the indigenous peoples of Alaska. Covering 1867 through 2011, the authors offer lucid explanations of the often-tangled history of policy and law as applied to Alaska’s first peoples. Divided conceptually into four broad themes of indigenous rights to land, subsistence, services, and sovereignty, the book offers a thorough and balanced analysis of the evolution of these rights in the forty-ninth state. This third edition brings the volume fully up to date, with consideration of the broader evolution of indigenous rights in international law and recent developments on the ground in Alaska.

Cases And Materials On Federal Indian Law

Author: David Getches
Publisher: West Academic Publishing
ISBN: 9781634599061
Size: 27.86 MB
Format: PDF
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This federal Indian law casebook has an unprecedented focus on Native Nation-building, including cutting-edge materials on tribal economies and tribal justice systems unavailable elsewhere. The Seventh Edition retains classic material on the history of federal Indian law and policy, including the medieval origins of the "Doctrine of Discovery," and the shifting eras of Indian law leading to the current Nation-building era. The book covers the federal tribal relationship; tribal sovereignty and jurisdiction; Indian religion and culture; water rights; treaty rights; rights of Alaska natives and native Hawaiians; and international legal perspectives.

Native American Natural Resources Law

Author: Judith V. Royster
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781531007157
Size: 47.78 MB
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This casebook explores issues relating to property rights, environmental protection, and natural resources in Indian country. The book explores tribal, cultural and religious relationships with the land, fundamental principles of federal Indian law, land ownership and property rights of tribes, land use and environmental protection, natural resources development, taxation of lands and resources, water rights, usufructuary (hunting, fishing, gathering) rights, and international approaches to indigenous rights in land and natural resources. It is designed to be used in a stand-alone course or as a supplemental reader for courses in environmental law, natural resources law, or Native American studies. The third edition updates the casebook to include recent Supreme Court cases as well as other judicial and legislative developments since 2008. The new edition also expands the materials on cultural and religious resources, the federal trust doctrine, the Cobell settlement, water rights settlements, natural resources damages, and international law.

Edward P Dozier

Author: Marilyn Norcini
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 9780816517909
Size: 27.13 MB
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Edward P. Dozier was the first American Indian to establish a career as an academic anthropologist. In doing so, he faced a double paradoxÑacademic and cultural. The notion of objectivity that governed academic anthropology at the time dictated that researchers be impartial outsiders. Scientific knowledge was considered unbiased, impersonal, and public. In contrast, DozierÕs Pueblo Indian culture regarded knowledge as privileged, personal, and gendered. Ceremonial knowledge was protected by secrecy and was never intended to be made public, either within or outside of the community. As an indigenous ethnologist and linguist, Dozier negotiated a careful balance between the conflicting values of a social scientist and a Pueblo Indian. Based on archival research, ethnographic fieldwork at Santa Clara Pueblo, and extensive interviews, this intellectual biography traces DozierÕs education from a Bureau of Indian Affairs day school through the University of New Mexico on federal reimbursable loans and graduate school on the GI Bill. Dozier was the first graduate of the new postÐWorld War II doctoral program in anthropology at the University of California at Los Angeles in 1952. Beginning with his multicultural and linguistic heritage, the book interprets pivotal moments in his career, including the impact of Pueblo kinship on his indigenous research at Tewa Village (Hano); his rising academic standing and Indian advocacy at Northwestern University; his achievement of full academic status after he conducted non-indigenous fieldwork with the Kalinga in the Philippines; and his leadership in establishing American Indian Studies at the University of Arizona. Norcini interprets DozierÕs career within the contexts of the history of American anthropology and Pueblo Indian culture. In the final analysis, Dozier is positioned as a transitional figure who helped transform the historical paradox of an American Indian anthropologist into the contemporary paradigm of indigenous scholarship in the academy.

Guided By The Mountains

Author: Michael Lerma
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190639873
Size: 43.16 MB
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What do traditional Indigenous institutions of governance offer to our understanding of the contemporary challenges faced by the Navajo Nation today and tomorrow? Guided by the Mountains looks at the tensions between Indigenous political philosophy and the challenges faced by Indigenous nations in building political institutions that address contemporary problems and enact "good governance." Specifically, it looks at Navajo, or Diné, political thought, focusing on traditional Diné institutions that offer "a new (old) understanding of contemporary governance challenges" facing the Navajo Nation. Arguing not only for the existence but also the persistence of traditional Navajo political thought and policy, Guided by the Mountains asserts that "traditional" Indigenous philosophy provides a model for creating effective governance institutions that address current issues faced by Indigenous nations. Incorporating both visual interpretations and narrative accounts of traditional and contemporary Diné institutions of government from Diné philosophers, the book is the first to represent Indigenous philosophy as the foundation behind traditional and contemporary governance. It also explains how Diné governance institutions operated during Pre-Contact and Post-Contact times. This path-breaking book stands as the first-time normative account of Diné philosophy.

American Indian Business

Author: Deanna M. Kennedy
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295742100
Size: 24.46 MB
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American Indian business is booming. The number of American Indian� and Alaska Native�owned businesses increased by 15.3 percent from 2007 to 2012�a time when the total number of US businesses increased by just 2 percent�and receipts grew from $34.4 million in 2002 to $8.8 billion in 2012. Despite this impressive growth, there is an absence of small businesses on reservations, and Native Americans own private businesses at the lowest rate per capita for any ethnic or racial group in the United States. Many Indigenous entrepreneurs face unique cultural and practical challenges in starting, locating, and operating a business, from a perceived lack of a culture of entrepreneurship and a suspicion of capitalism to the difficulty of borrowing start-up funds when real estate is held in trust and cannot be used as collateral. This book provides an accessible introduction to American Indian businesses, business practices, and business education. Its chapters cover the history of American Indian business from early trading posts to today�s casino boom; economic sustainability, self-determination, and sovereignty; organization and management; marketing; leadership; human resource management; tribal finance; business strategy and positioning; American Indian business law; tribal gaming operations; the importance of economic development and the challenges of economic leakage; entrepreneurship; technology and data management; business ethics; service management; taxation; accounting; and health-care management. American Indian Business also furthers the inclusion of Indigenous perspectives in the study of American business practices in general and demonstrates the significant impact that American Indians have had on business, as well as their cultural contributions to management, leadership, marketing, economic development, and entrepreneurship.

Unearthing Indian Land

Author: Kristin T. Ruppel
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 9780816527113
Size: 54.29 MB
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Unearthing Indian Land offers a comprehensive examination of the consequencesof more than a century of questionable public policies. In this book,Kristin Ruppel considers the complicated issues surrounding American Indianland ownership in the United States. Under the General Allotment Act of 1887, also known as the Dawes Act,individual Indians were issued title to land allotments while so-called ÒsurplusÓIndian lands were opened to non-Indian settlement. During the forty-seven yearsthat the act remained in effect, American Indians lost an estimated 90 millionacres of landÑabout two-thirds of the land they had held in 1887. Worse, theloss of control over the land left to them has remained an ongoing and insidiousresult. Unearthing Indian Land traces the complex legacies of allotment, includingnumerous instructive examples of a policy gone wrong. Aside from the initialcatastrophic land loss, the fractionated land ownership that resulted from theactÕs provisions has disrupted native families and their descendants for morethan a century. With each new generation, the owners of tribal lands grow innumber and therefore own ever smaller interests in parcels of land. It is not uncommonnow to find reservation allotments co-owned by hundreds of individuals.Coupled with the federal governmentÕs troubled trusteeship of Indian assets,this means that Indian landowners have very little control over their own lands. Illuminated by interviews with Native American landholders, this book isessential reading for anyone who is interested in what happened as a result of thefederal governmentÕs quasi-privatization of native lands.