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Anthropology

Author: Robert H. Lavenda
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195189766
Size: 31.48 MB
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A unique alternative to more traditional, encyclopedic introductory texts, Anthropology: What Does It Mean to Be Human? takes a question-oriented approach that illuminates major concepts for students. Structuring each chapter around an important question, the authors explore what it means to be human, incorporating answers from all four subfields of anthropology--cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and archaeology--and offering a more balanced perspective than other texts. They address central issues of the discipline, highlighting the controversies and commitments that are shaping contemporary anthropology. FEATURES: * Covers the material in fifteen concise chapters--an ideal text for a one-semester course * Addresses issues of power and inequality in the contemporary world--including racism, ethnic discrimination, nationalism, caste, and class * Incorporates cutting-edge theory and gender and feminist anthropology throughout * Takes an explicitly global approach, discussing ways in which the spread of capitalism has drastically reshaped how people everywhere live their lives * Presents new voices and alternative perspectives from nonanthropologists and indigenous peoples through "In Their Own Words" commentaries * Provides ethnographic summaries--with maps--of each society discussed at length in the text in "EthnoProfile" boxes * Integrates additional helpful pedagogical aids including key terms, a running glossary, chapter summaries, maps, and annotated suggestions for further reading * Supplemented by an Instructor's Manual and Computerized Test Bank Course Management Systems are available from your Oxford representative.

Anthropology

Author: Robert H. Lavenda
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780190840686
Size: 44.93 MB
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A unique alternative to more traditional, encyclopedic introductory texts, Anthropology: What Does It Mean to Be Human?, Fourth Edition, takes a question-oriented approach that incorporates cutting-edge theory and new ways of looking at important contemporary issues such as power, human rights, and inequality. With a total of sixteen chapters, this engaging, full-color text is an ideal one-semester overview that delves deep into anthropology without overwhelming students.

What Does It Mean To Be Human

Author: Richard Potts
Publisher: National Geographic Books
ISBN: 1426206062
Size: 69.82 MB
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This generously illustrated book tells the story of the human family, showing how our species’ physical traits and behaviors evolved over millions of years as our ancestors adapted to dramatic environmental changes. In What Does It Means to Be Human? Rick Potts, director of the Smithsonian’s Human Origins Program, and Chris Sloan, National Geographic’s paleoanthropolgy expert, delve into our distant past to explain when, why, and how we acquired the unique biological and cultural qualities that govern our most fundamental connections and interactions with other people and with the natural world. Drawing on the latest research, they conclude that we are the last survivors of a once-diverse family tree, and that our evolution was shaped by one of the most unstable eras in Earth’s environmental history. The book presents a wealth of attractive new material especially developed for the Hall’s displays, from life-like reconstructions of our ancestors sculpted by the acclaimed John Gurche to photographs from National Geographic and Smithsonian archives, along with informative graphics and illustrations. In coordination with the exhibit opening, the PBS program NOVA will present a related three-part television series, and the museum will launch a website expected to draw 40 million visitors.

Anthropology

Author: Joy Hendry
Publisher: Oneworld Publications
ISBN: 1780741170
Size: 15.27 MB
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In this illuminating tour of humanity, Joy Hendry and Simon Underdown reveal the origins of our species, and the fabric of human society, through the discipline of anthropology. Via fascinating case studies and discoveries, they unravel our understanding of human behaviours and beliefs, including how witchcraft has been used to justify misfortune, and debunk old-fashioned ideas about “race” based upon the latest genetic research. They even share what our bathroom tells us about our concept of the body – and ourselves. From our evolutionary ancestors, through our rites of passage, to our responses to globalization, Hendry and Underdown provide the essential first step to understanding the world as an anthropologist would – in all its diversity and commonality.

Christological Anthropology In Historical Perspective

Author: Marc Cortez
Publisher: Zondervan
ISBN: 0310516420
Size: 57.40 MB
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What does it mean to be “truly human?” In Christological Anthropology in Historical Perspective, Marc Cortez looks at the ways several key theologians—Gregory of Nyssa, Julian of Norwich, Martin Luther, Friedrich Schleiermacher, Karl Barth, John Zizioulas, and James Cone—have used Christology to inform their understanding of the human person. Based on this historical study, he concludes with a constructive proposal for how Christology and anthropology should work together to inform our view of what it means to be human. Many theologians begin their discussion of the human person by claiming that in some way Jesus Christ reveals what it means to be “truly human,” but this often has little impact in the material presentation of their anthropology. Although modern theologians often fail to reflect robustly on the relationship between Christology and anthropology, this was not the case throughout church history. In this book, examine seven key theologians and discover their important contributions to theological anthropology.

How Forests Think

Author: Eduardo Kohn
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520276108
Size: 14.61 MB
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Can forests think? Do dogs dream? In this astonishing book, Eduardo Kohn challenges the very foundations of anthropology, calling into question our central assumptions about what it means to be human—and thus distinct from all other life forms. Based on four years of fieldwork among the Runa of Ecuador’s Upper Amazon, Eduardo Kohn draws on his rich ethnography to explore how Amazonians interact with the many creatures that inhabit one of the world’s most complex ecosystems. Whether or not we recognize it, our anthropological tools hinge on those capacities that make us distinctly human. However, when we turn our ethnographic attention to how we relate to other kinds of beings, these tools (which have the effect of divorcing us from the rest of the world) break down. How Forests Think seizes on this breakdown as an opportunity. Avoiding reductionistic solutions, and without losing sight of how our lives and those of others are caught up in the moral webs we humans spin, this book skillfully fashions new kinds of conceptual tools from the strange and unexpected properties of the living world itself. In this groundbreaking work, Kohn takes anthropology in a new and exciting direction–one that offers a more capacious way to think about the world we share with other kinds of beings.

Catching Fire

Author: Richard W. Wrangham
Publisher: Profile Books
ISBN: 184668286X
Size: 18.74 MB
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In this stunningly original book, Richard Wrangham argues that it was cooking that caused the extraordinary transformation of our ancestors from apelike beings to Homo erectus. At the heart of Catching Fire lies an explosive new idea: the habit of eating cooked rather than raw food permitted the digestive tract to shrink and the human brain to grow, helped structure human society, and created the male-female division of labour. As our ancestors adapted to using fire, humans emerged as "the cooking apes". Covering everything from food-labelling and overweight pets to raw-food faddists, Catching Fire offers a startlingly original argument about how we came to be the social, intelligent, and sexual species we are today. "This notion is surprising, fresh and, in the hands of Richard Wrangham, utterly persuasive ... Big, new ideas do not come along often in evolution these days, but this is one." -Matt Ridley, author of Genome

What It Means To Be 98 Chimpanzee

Author: Jonathan Marks
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520930766
Size: 18.89 MB
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Marks presents the field of molecular anthropology—a synthesis of the holistic approach of anthropology with the reductive approach of molecular genetics—as a way of improving our understanding of the science of human evolution. This iconoclastic, witty, and extremely readable book illuminates the deep background of our place in nature and asks us to think critically about what science is, and what passes for it, in modern society.

What It Means To Be Human

Author: Joanna Bourke
Publisher: Counterpoint Press
ISBN: 1582436088
Size: 75.83 MB
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Discusses the distinction between being a "human" and being an "animal" over the past two hundred years and describes how modern rights and ethics are blurring the lines between the two.