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Ar N T I A Woman

Author: Deborah Gray White
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393314816
Size: 55.95 MB
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Explores the contributions made by enslaved women to the family's economy and suggests they achieved a greater degree of equality with their men than white women

Ar N T I A Woman Female Slaves In The Plantation South Revised Edition

Author: Deborah Gray White
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393343529
Size: 11.99 MB
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"This is one of those rare books that quickly became the standard work in its field. Professor White has done justice to the complexity of her subject."—Anne Firor Scott, Duke University Living with the dual burdens of racism and sexism, slave women in the plantation South assumed roles within the family and community that contrasted sharply with traditional female roles in the larger American society. This new edition of Ar'n't I a Woman? reviews and updates the scholarship on slave women and the slave family, exploring new ways of understanding the intersection of race and gender and comparing the myths that stereotyped female slaves with the realities of their lives. Above all, this groundbreaking study shows us how black women experienced freedom in the Reconstruction South — their heroic struggle to gain their rights, hold their families together, resist economic and sexual oppression, and maintain their sense of womanhood against all odds.

Let My People Go

Author: Deborah Gray White
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0195087690
Size: 41.18 MB
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Discusses the lives of African Americans from the early years of the nineteenth century to the start of the Civil War.

Too Heavy A Load

Author: Deborah Gray White
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393319927
Size: 62.52 MB
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Chronicles one hundred years in the struggle of African American women to attain equality and to establish a resistance to persistent racism and negative stereotyping

Scarlet And Black

Author: Marisa J. Fuentes
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813592127
Size: 61.72 MB
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The 250th anniversary of the founding of Rutgers University is a perfect moment for the Rutgers community to reconcile its past, and acknowledge its role in the enslavement and debasement of African Americans and the disfranchisement and elimination of Native American people and culture. Scarlet and Black documents the history of Rutgers’s connection to slavery, which was neither casual nor accidental—nor unusual. Like most early American colleges, Rutgers depended on slaves to build its campuses and serve its students and faculty; it depended on the sale of black people to fund its very existence. Men like John Henry Livingston, (Rutgers president from 1810–1824), the Reverend Philip Milledoler, (president of Rutgers from 1824–1840), Henry Rutgers, (trustee after whom the college is named), and Theodore Frelinghuysen, (Rutgers’s seventh president), were among the most ardent anti-abolitionists in the mid-Atlantic. Scarlet and black are the colors Rutgers University uses to represent itself to the nation and world. They are the colors the athletes compete in, the graduates and administrators wear on celebratory occasions, and the colors that distinguish Rutgers from every other university in the United States. This book, however, uses these colors to signify something else: the blood that was spilled on the banks of the Raritan River by those dispossessed of their land and the bodies that labored unpaid and in bondage so that Rutgers could be built and sustained. The contributors to this volume offer this history as a usable one—not to tear down or weaken this very renowned, robust, and growing institution—but to strengthen it and help direct its course for the future. The work of the Committee on Enslaved and Disenfranchised Population in Rutgers History. Visit the project's website at http://scarletandblack.rutgers.edu

Within The Plantation Household

Author: Elizabeth Fox-Genovese
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 0807864226
Size: 78.63 MB
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Documenting the difficult class relations between women slaveholders and slave women, this study shows how class and race as well as gender shaped women's experiences and determined their identities. Drawing upon massive research in diaries, letters, memoirs, and oral histories, the author argues that the lives of antebellum southern women, enslaved and free, differed fundamentally from those of northern women and that it is not possible to understand antebellum southern women by applying models derived from New England sources.

Women And Slavery The Modern Atlantic

Author: Gwyn Campbell
Publisher: Ohio University Press
ISBN: 0821417258
Size: 11.85 MB
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The particular experience of enslaved women, across different cultures and many different eras is the focus of this work.

Beyond Nature S Housekeepers

Author: Nancy C. Unger
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199986002
Size: 70.18 MB
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From pre-Columbian times to the environmental justice movements of the present, women and men frequently responded to the environment and environmental issues in profoundly different ways. Although both environmental history and women's history are flourishing fields, explorations of the synergy produced by the interplay between environment and sex, sexuality, and gender are just beginning. Offering more than biographies of great women in environmental history, Beyond Nature's Housekeepers examines the intersections that shaped women's unique environmental concerns and activism and that framed the way the larger culture responded. Women featured include Native Americans, colonists, enslaved field workers, pioneers, homemakers, municipal housekeepers, immigrants, hunters, nature writers, soil conservationists, scientists, migrant laborers, nuclear protestors, and environmental justice activists. As women, they fared, thought, and acted in ways complicated by social, political, and economic norms, as well as issues of sexuality and childbearing. Nancy C. Unger reveals how women have played a unique role, for better and sometimes for worse, in the shaping of the American environment.