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Before The Law An Introduction To The Legal Process

Author: CTI Reviews
Publisher: Cram101 Textbook Reviews
ISBN: 1478460628
Size: 23.21 MB
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Facts101 is your complete guide to Before the Law, An Introduction to the Legal Process. In this book, you will learn topics such as as those in your book plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.

Ultimate Punishment

Author: Scott Turow
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 9780374706470
Size: 10.74 MB
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America's leading writer about the law takes a close, incisive look at one of society's most vexing legal issues Scott Turow is known to millions as the author of peerless novels about the troubling regions of experience where law and reality intersect. In "real life," as a respected criminal lawyer, he has been involved with the death penalty for more than a decade, including successfully representing two different men convicted in death-penalty prosecutions. In this vivid account of how his views on the death penalty have evolved, Turow describes his own experiences with capital punishment from his days as an impassioned young prosecutor to his recent service on the Illinois commission which investigated the administration of the death penalty and influenced Governor George Ryan's unprecedented commutation of the sentences of 164 death row inmates on his last day in office. Along the way, he provides a brief history of America's ambivalent relationship with the ultimate punishment, analyzes the potent reasons for and against it, including the role of the victims' survivors, and tells the powerful stories behind the statistics, as he moves from the Governor's Mansion to Illinois' state-of-the art 'super-max' prison and the execution chamber. This gripping, clear-sighted, necessary examination of the principles, the personalities, and the politics of a fundamental dilemma of our democracy has all the drama and intellectual substance of Turow's celebrated fiction.

Thinking Like A Lawyer

Author: Frederick Schauer
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674032705
Size: 12.64 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This primer on legal reasoning is aimed at law students and upper-level undergraduates. But it is also an original exposition of basic legal concepts that scholars and lawyers will find stimulating. It covers such topics as rules, precedent, authority, analogical reasoning, the common law, statutory interpretation, legal realism, judicial opinions, legal facts, and burden of proof.

Shades Of Freedom

Author: A. Leon Higginbotham Jr.
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198028673
Size: 74.90 MB
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Few individuals have had as great an impact on the law--both its practice and its history--as A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr. A winner of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, he has distinguished himself over the decades both as a professor at Yale, the University of Pennsylvania, and Harvard, and as a judge on the United States Court of Appeals. But Judge Higginbotham is perhaps best known as an authority on racism in America: not the least important achievement of his long career has been In the Matter of Color, the first volume in a monumental history of race and the American legal process. Published in 1978, this brilliant book has been hailed as the definitive account of racism, slavery, and the law in colonial America. Now, after twenty years, comes the long-awaited sequel. In Shades of Freedom, Higginbotham provides a magisterial account of the interaction between the law and racial oppression in America from colonial times to the present, demonstrating how the one agent that should have guaranteed equal treatment before the law--the judicial system--instead played a dominant role in enforcing the inferior position of blacks. The issue of racial inferiority is central to this volume, as Higginbotham documents how early white perceptions of black inferiority slowly became codified into law. Perhaps the most powerful and insightful writing centers on a pair of famous Supreme Court cases, which Higginbotham uses to portray race relations at two vital moments in our history. The Dred Scott decision of 1857 declared that a slave who had escaped to free territory must be returned to his slave owner. Chief Justice Roger Taney, in his notorious opinion for the majority, stated that blacks were "so inferior that they had no right which the white man was bound to respect." For Higginbotham, Taney's decision reflects the extreme state that race relations had reached just before the Civil War. And after the War and Reconstruction, Higginbotham reveals, the Courts showed a pervasive reluctance (if not hostility) toward the goal of full and equal justice for African Americans, and this was particularly true of the Supreme Court. And in the Plessy v. Ferguson decision, which Higginbotham terms "one of the most catastrophic racial decisions ever rendered," the Court held that full equality--in schooling or housing, for instance--was unnecessary as long as there were "separate but equal" facilities. Higginbotham also documents the eloquent voices that opposed the openly racist workings of the judicial system, from Reconstruction Congressman John R. Lynch to Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan to W. E. B. Du Bois, and he shows that, ironically, it was the conservative Supreme Court of the 1930s that began the attack on school segregation, and overturned the convictions of African Americans in the famous Scottsboro case. But today racial bias still dominates the nation, Higginbotham concludes, as he shows how in six recent court cases the public perception of black inferiority continues to persist. In Shades of Freedom, a noted scholar and celebrated jurist offers a work of magnificent scope, insight, and passion. Ranging from the earliest colonial times to the present, it is a superb work of history--and a mirror to the American soul.

Introduction To Law And The Legal System

Author: Frank Schubert
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1285438256
Size: 37.15 MB
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INTRODUCTION TO LAW AND THE LEGAL SYSTEM provides an overview of law and the American legal system, using cases to support the major functions of U.S. law. Suitable for a variety of departments and courses, this text is known for its broad coverage, flexible organization, and use of cases to explain legal concepts. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Law In Our Lives

Author: David O. Friedrichs
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780199840748
Size: 37.60 MB
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"Law in Our Lives is a survey text intended primarily for courses in law and society that are taught from a more sociological perspective. It treats law as a complex, evolving, interdisciplinary field, which also makes it suitable for courses in legal history and philosophy. The book is known for its lucid writing style as well as its comprehensiveness--which is viewed as a benefit by some and a drawback by others. It combines detailed theoretical discussions with real-world examples to provide a broad analysis of the nature of law in contemporary society. It includes a wide array of pedagogical material, including boldfaced key terms and discussion questions, as well as appendices on case briefing, law in films, and websites of interest"--

Thinking Like A Lawyer

Author: Kenneth J. Vandevelde
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0429973888
Size: 25.51 MB
Format: PDF
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Law students, law professors, and lawyers frequently refer to the process of "thinking like a lawyer," but attempts to analyze in any systematic way what is meant by that phrase are rare. In his classic book, Kenneth J. Vandevelde defines this elusive phrase and identifies the techniques involved in thinking like a lawyer. Unlike most legal writings, which are plagued by difficult, virtually incomprehensible language, this book is accessible and clearly written and will help students, professionals, and general readers gain important insight into this well-developed and valuable way of thinking.Updated for a new generation of lawyers, the second edition features a new chapter on contemporary perspectives on legal reasoning. A useful new appendix serves as a survival guide for current and prospective law students and describes how to apply the techniques in the book to excel in law school.