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Before The Pioneers

Author: Andrew K. Frank
Publisher: Florida in Focus
ISBN: 9780813054513
Size: 14.77 MB
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"In this riveting account, Frank moves beyond stories of recent development to uncover the deep history of a place profoundly shaped by mound-builders, slaves, raiders, and traders. This book will change the way you think about Florida history."--Christina Snyder, author of Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America "Reveals that Old Miami seems a lot like New Miami: a place bursting with energy and desperation, fresh faces, and ancient dreams."--Gary R. Mormino, author of Land of Sunshine, State of Dreams: A Social History of Modern Florida "A deep, intelligent look at the parade of peoples who dotted the north bank of the Miami River for thousands of years before Miami's modern era."--Paul S. George, author of Along the Miami River "A masterful history. A must-read for anyone who wants to learn about Miami."--Arva Moore Parks, author of George Merrick, Son of the South Wind Formed seemingly out of steel, glass, and concrete, with millions of residents from around the globe, Miami has ancient roots that can be hard to imagine today. Before the Pioneers takes readers back through forgotten eras to the stories of the people who shaped the land along the Miami River long before most modern histories of the city begin. Andrew Frank begins the chronicle of the Magic City's long history 4,000 years ago when Tequesta Indians settled at the mouth of the river, erecting burial mounds, ceremonial centers, and villages. Centuries later, the area became a stopover for Spanish colonists on their way to Havana. Frank brings to life the vibrant colonies of fugitives and seafarers that formed on the shores of Biscayne Bay in the eighteenth century. He tells of the emergence of the tropical fruit plantations and the accompanying enslaved communities, as well as the military occupation during the Seminole Wars. Eventually, the small seaport town flourished with the coming of "pioneers" like Julia Tuttle and Henry Flagler who promoted the city as a place of luxury and brought new waves of residents from the North. Frank pieces together the material culture and the historical record of the Miami River to re-create the fascinating past of one of the world's most influential cities. A volume in the series Florida in Focus, edited by Frederick R. Davis and Andrew K. Frank

Creeks And Southerners

Author: Andrew Frank
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803220164
Size: 42.51 MB
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"Creeks and Southerners studies the ways in which many children of these relationships lived both as Creek Indians and white Southerners. By carefully altering their physical appearances, choosing appropriate clothing, learning multiple languages, embracing maternal and paternal kinsmen and kinswomen, and balancing their loyalties, the children of intermarriages found ways to bridge what seemed to be an unbridgeable divide."--BOOK JACKET.

Atlantic Loyalties

Author: Francis Andrew McMichael
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820336503
Size: 67.50 MB
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Integrating social, cultural, economic, and political history, this is a study of the factors that grounded--or swayed--the loyalties of non-Spaniards living under Spanish rule on the southern frontier. In particular, Andrew McMichael looks at the colonial Spanish administration’s attitude toward resident Americans. The Spanish borderlands systems of slavery and land ownership, McMichael shows, used an efficient system of land distribution and government patronage that engendered loyalty and withstood a series of conflicts that tested, but did not shatter, residents’ allegiance. McMichael focuses on the Baton Rouge district of Spanish West Florida from 1785 through 1810, analyzing why resident Anglo-Americans, who had maintained a high degree of loyalty to the Spanish Crown through 1809, rebelled in 1810. The book contextualizes the 1810 rebellion, and by extension the southern frontier, within the broader Atlantic World, showing how both local factors as well as events in Europe affected lives in the Spanish borderlands. Breaking with traditional scholarship, McMichael examines contests over land and slaves as a determinant of loyalty. He draws on Spanish, French, and Anglo records to challenge scholarship that asserts a particularly “American” loyalty on the frontier whereby Anglo-American residents in West Florida, as disaffected subjects of the Spanish Crown, patiently abided until they could overthrow an alien system. Rather, it was political, social, and cultural conflicts--not nationalist ideology--that disrupted networks by which economic prosperity was gained and thus loyalty retained.

Florida S Frontiers

Author: Paul E. Hoffman
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253108784
Size: 47.32 MB
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Florida has had many frontiers. Imagination, greed, missionary zeal, disease, war, and diplomacy have created its historical boundaries. Bodies of water, soil, flora and fauna, the patterns of Native American occupation, and ways of colonizing have defined Florida's frontiers. Paul E. Hoffman tells the story of those frontiers and how the land and the people shaped them during the three centuries from 1565 to 1860. For settlers to La Florida, the American Southeast ca. 1500, better natural and human resources were found on the piedmont and on the western side of Florida's central ridge, while the coasts and coastal plains proved far less inviting. But natural environment was only one important factor in the settlement of Florida. The Spaniards, the British, the Seminole and Miccosuki, the Spaniards once again, and finally Americans constructed their Florida frontiers in interaction with the Native Americans who were present, the vestiges of earlier frontiers, and international events. The near-completion of the range and township surveys by 1860 and of the deportation of most of the Seminole and Miccosuki mark the end of the Florida frontier, though frontier-like conditions persisted in many parts of the state into the early 20th century. For this major work of Florida history, Hoffman has drawn from a broad range of secondary works and from his intensive research in Spanish archival sources of the 16th and 17th centuries. Florida's Frontiers will be welcomed by students of history well beyond the Sunshine State.

The Cross In The Sand

Author: Michael V. Gannon
Publisher: University Press of Florida
ISBN: 9780813007762
Size: 79.29 MB
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The story of the early centuries of the Catholic Church in Florida, the oldest establishment of the Christian faith in the United States, is one of the most remarkable in Florida's more than 400 years of history. Michael Gannon first traces Florida's discovery by Catholics, their subsequent explorations, the Spanish settlements, and the evangelization of the Indians, followed by the tragic end of the missions and the temporary collapse of Catholic ascendancy during the British period. The story continues with the reappearance of Catholicism among Minorcan immigrants; the establishment by the Church of Florida's (and the nation's) first schools and hospitals; the schism of the St. Augustine's Church Wardens in the 1820s and 1830s; the arrival of Florida's first bishop, Augustine Verot, in 1858, and beyond. Across these pages stride Indians from the woods and shores; priests, conquistadors, and statesmen; Spaniards and Minorcans, Unionists and Confederates, mothers and nuns, the rich and the poor, the innocent and the repentant. Illustrated with maps and rare old sketches and photographs, The Cross in the Sand is as exciting and easy to read as a novel. The book's literary grace is matched by its historical authenticity, because Gannon has used all available manuscripts as well as the best secondary sources of this and past centuries.

Laboring In The Fields Of The Lord

Author: Jerald T. Milanich
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780813029665
Size: 33.53 MB
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The missions of Spanish Florida are one of American history's best kept secrets. Between 1565 and 1763, more than 150 missions with names like San Francisco and San Antonio dotted the landscape from south Florida to the Chesapeake Bay. Drawing on archaeological and historical research, much conducted in the last 25 years, Milanich offers a vivid description of these missions and the Apalachee, Guale, and Timucua Indians who lived and labored in them. First published in 1999 by Smithsonian Institution Press, Laboring in the Fields of the Lord contends the missions were an integral part of Spain's La Florida colony, turning a potentially hostile population into an essential labor force. Indian workers grew, harvested, ground, and transported corn that helped to feed the colony. Indians also provided labor for construction projects, including the imposing stone Castillo de San Marcos that still dominates St. Augustine today. Missions were essential to the goal of colonialism. Together, conquistadors, missionaries, and entrepreneurs went hand-in-hand to conquer the people of the Americas. Though long abandoned and destroyed, the missions are an important part of our country's heritage. This reprint edition includes a new, updated preface by the author.

Borderland Narratives

Author: A. Glenn Crothers
Publisher: Contested Boundaries
ISBN: 9780813054957
Size: 59.46 MB
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Frank and Crothers have gathered ten essays to explore the newer, more capacious applications of borderlands study, with a particular emphasis on the Ohio Valley--which, in its own uneasy placement between the traditional north/south sectional divide, becomes a case study in what can be gained by placing the borderlands concept at the center of inquiry. By crossing geographic, chronological, and methodological boundaries, the volume shows various ways the borderlands concept can enhance scholars' understanding of political, cultural, religious, and racial interactions throughout North America.

The Threshold Of Manifest Destiny

Author: Laurel Clark Shire
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812293037
Size: 41.43 MB
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Among the many contentious frontier zones in nineteenth-century North America, Florida was an early and important borderland where the United States worked out how it would colonize new territories.

Colonial Captivity During The First World War

Author: Mahon Murphy
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108509878
Size: 30.96 MB
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With the outbreak of war in 1914, an estimated 30,000 German civilians in African and Asian colonies were violently uprooted and imprisoned. Britain's First World War internment of German settlers seriously challenged the structures that underpinned nineteenth-century imperialism. Through its analysis of this internment, this book highlights the impact that the First World War had on the notion of a common European 'civilising mission' and the image of empire in the early twentieth century. Mahon Murphy examines the effect of the war on a collective European colonial identity, perceptions of internment in the extra-European theatres of war, and empires in transition during war. Policymakers were forced to address difficult questions about the future rule of Germany's colonies and the nature of empire in general. Far from a conflict restricted to European powers, the First World War triggered a worldwide remaking of ideas, institutions and geopolitics.

Adventurism And Empire

Author: David Narrett
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469618346
Size: 11.11 MB
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In this expansive book, David Narrett shows how the United States emerged as a successor empire to Great Britain through rivalry with Spain in the Mississippi Valley and Gulf Coast. As he traces currents of peace and war over four critical decades--from the close of the Seven Years War through the Louisiana Purchase--Narrett sheds new light on individual colonial adventurers and schemers who shaped history through cross-border trade, settlement projects involving slave and free labor, and military incursions aimed at Spanish and Indian territories. Narrett examines the clash of empires and nationalities from diverse perspectives. He weighs the challenges facing Native Americans along with the competition between Spanish, French, British, and U.S. interests. In a turbulent era, the Louisiana and Florida borderlands were shaken by tremors from the American Revolutionary War and the French Revolution. By demonstrating pervasive intrigue and subterfuge in borderland rivalries, Narrett shows that U.S. Manifest Destiny was not a linear or inevitable progression. He offers a fresh interpretation of how events in the Louisiana and Florida borderlands altered the North American balance of power, and affected the history of the Atlantic world.