Download begging as a path to progress indigenous women and children and the struggle for ecuadors urban spaces geographies of justice and social transformation in pdf or read begging as a path to progress indigenous women and children and the struggle for ecuadors urban spaces geographies of justice and social transformation in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get begging as a path to progress indigenous women and children and the struggle for ecuadors urban spaces geographies of justice and social transformation in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Begging As A Path To Progress

Author: Kate Swanson
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820334650
Size: 23.34 MB
Format: PDF
View: 663
Download and Read
In 1992, Calhuasí, an isolated Andean town, got its first road. Newly connected to Ecuador's large cities, Calhuasí experienced rapid social-spatial change, which Kate Swanson richly describes in Begging as a Path to Progress. Based on nineteen months of fieldwork, Swanson's study pays particular attention to the ideas and practices surrounding youth. While begging seems to be inconsistent with—or even an affront to—ideas about childhood in the developed world, Swanson demonstrates that the majority of income earned from begging goes toward funding Ecuadorian children's educations in hopes of securing more prosperous futures. Examining beggars' organized migration networks, as well as the degree to which children can express agency and fulfill personal ambitions through begging, Swanson argues that Calhuasí's beggars are capable of canny engagement with the forces of change. She also shows how frequent movement between rural and urban Ecuador has altered both, masculinizing the countryside and complicating the Ecuadorian conflation of whiteness and cities. Finally, her study unpacks ongoing conflicts over programs to “clean up” Quito and other major cities, noting that revanchist efforts have had multiple effects—spurring more dangerous transnational migration, for example, while also providing some women and children with tourist-friendly local spaces in which to sell a notion of Andean authenticity.

Relational Poverty Politics

Author: Victoria Lawson
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820353124
Size: 42.98 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 983
Download and Read
This collection examines the power and transformative potential of movements that fight against poverty and inequality. Broadly, poverty politics are struggles to define who is poor, what it means to be poor, what actions might be taken, and who should act. These movements shape the sociocultural and political economic structures that constitute poverty and privilege as material and social relations. Editors Victoria Lawson and Sarah Elwood focus on the politics of insurgent movements against poverty and inequality in seven countries (Argentina, India, Brazil, South Africa, Thailand, Singapore, and the United States). The contributors explore theory and practice in alliance politics, resistance movements, the militarized repression of justice movements, global counterpublics, and political theater. These movements reflect the diversity of poverty politics and the relations between bureaucracies and antipoverty movements. They discuss work done by mass and other types of mobilizations across multiple scales; forms of creative and political alliance across axes of difference; expressions and exercises of agency by people named as poor; and the kinds of rights and other claims that are made in different spaces and places. Relational Poverty Politics advocates for poverty knowledge grounded in relational perspectives that highlight the adversarial relationship of poverty to privilege, as well as the possibility for alliances across different groups. It incorporates current research in the field and demonstrates how relational poverty knowledge is best seen as a model for understanding how theory is derivative of action as much as the other way around. The book lays a foundation for realistic change that can directly attack poverty at its roots. Contributors: Antonádia Borges, Dia Da Costa, Sarah Elwood, David Boarder Giles, Jim Glassman, Victoria Lawson, Felipe Magalhães, Jeff Maskovsky, Richa Nagar, Genevieve Negrón-Gonzales, LaShawnDa Pittman, Frances Fox Piven, Preeti Sampat, Thomas Swerts, and Junjia Ye.

Water Justice

Author: Rutgerd Boelens
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107179084
Size: 19.77 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 6406
Download and Read
An overview of critical conceptual approaches to water justice, illustrated with global historic and contemporary case studies of socio-environmental struggles.

Red Pedagogy

Author: Sandy Grande
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 161048990X
Size: 43.76 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2797
Download and Read
This ground-breaking text explores the intersection between dominant modes of critical educational theory and the socio-political landscape of American Indian education. Grande asserts that, with few exceptions, the matters of Indigenous people and Indian education have been either largely ignored or indiscriminately absorbed within critical theories of education.

Migration Squatting And Radical Autonomy

Author: Pierpaolo Mudu
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317375769
Size: 61.33 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 99
Download and Read
This book offers a unique contribution, exploring how the intersections among migrants and radical squatter’s movements have evolved over past decades. The complexity and importance of squatting practices are analyzed from a bottom-up perspective, to demonstrate how the spaces of squatting can be transformed by migrants. With contributions from scholars, scholar-activists, and activists, this book provides unique insights into how squatting has offered an alternative to dominant anti-immigrant policies, and the implications of squatting on the social acceptance of migrants. It illustrates the different mechanisms of protest followed in solidarity by migrant squatters and Social Center activists, when discrimination comes from above or below, and explores how can different spatialities be conceived and realized by radical practices. Contributions adopt a variety of perspectives, from critical human geography, social movement studies, political sociology, urban anthropology, autonomous Marxism, feminism, open localism, anarchism and post-structuralism, to analyze and contextualize migrants and squatters’ exclusion and social justice issues. This book is a timely and original contribution through its exploration of migrations, squatting and radical autonomy.

Human Development Report 2016

Author: United Nations Development Programme
Publisher: Human Development Report (Pape
ISBN: 9789211264135
Size: 17.82 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 5162
Download and Read
This report focuses on how human development can be ensured for everyone, now and in future. It starts with an account of the hopes and challenges of today's world, envisioning where humanity wants to go. This vision draws from and builds on the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals. It explores who has been left behind in human development progress and why. It argues that to ensure that human development reaches everyone, some aspects of the human development framework and assessment perspectives have to be brought to the fore. The Report also identifies the national policies and key strategies to ensure that will enable every human being achieve at least basic human development and to sustain and protect the gains.

The Indigenous World 2005

Author: Diana Vinding
Publisher: IWGIA
ISBN: 8791563054
Size: 35.31 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 2713
Download and Read
This yearbook contains the most comprehensive update on the current situation of indigenous peoples and the human rights and other international processes related to indigenous peoples. With contributions from both indigenous as well as non-indigenous scholars and activists, The Indigenous World gives an overview of crucial developments in 2004 that have impacted indigenous peoples of the world. It includes region and country reports covering most of the indigenous world and updated information on the processes within the UN system that relate to indigenous peoples such as: The Permanent Forum, The Draft Declaration on the Rights of the Indigenous Peoples, and The Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Indigenous Peoples. It also brings updated information on other international processes including news from the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights and the Organization of American States. Diana Vinding is an anthropologist and project coordinator at The International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs.

Victims Of Progress

Author: John H. Bodley
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442226943
Size: 14.74 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 6514
Download and Read
Victims of Progress, now in its sixth edition, offers a compelling account of how technology and development affect indigenous peoples throughout the world. Bodley’s expansive look at the struggle between small-scale indigenous societies, and the colonists and corporate developers who have infringed their territories reaches from 1800 into today. He examines major issues of intervention such as social engineering, economic development, self-determination, health and disease, global warming, and ecocide. Small-scale societies, Bodley convincingly demonstrates, have survived by organizing politically to defend their basic human rights. Providing a provocative context in which to think about civilization and its costs—shedding light on how we are all victims of progress—the sixth edition features expanded discussion of “uprising politics,” Tebtebba (a particularly active indigenous organization), and voluntary isolation. A wholly new chapter devotes full coverage to the costs of global warming to indigenous peoples in the Pacific and the Arctic. Finally, new appendixes guide readers to recent protest petitions as well as online resources and videos.

Indigenous Peoples And Climate Change In Latin America And The Caribbean

Author: Jakob Kronik
Publisher: World Bank Publications
ISBN: 9780821383810
Size: 24.56 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 5205
Download and Read
This book addresses the social implications of climate change and climatic variability on indigenous peoples and communities living in the highlands, lowlands, and coastal areas of Latin America and the Caribbean. Across the region, indigenous people already perceive and experience negative effects of climate change and variability. Many indigenous communities find it difficult to adapt in a culturally sustainable manner. In fact, indigenous peoples often blame themselves for the changes they observe in nature, despite their limited emission of green house gasses. Not only is the viability of their livelihoods threatened, resulting in food insecurity and poor health, but also their cultural integrity is being challenged, eroding the confidence in solutions provided by traditional institutions and authorities. The book is based on field research among indigenous communities in three major eco-geographical regions: the Amazon; the Andes and Sub-Andes; and the Caribbean and Mesoamerica. It finds major inter-regional differences in the impacts observed between areas prone to rapid- and slow-onset natural hazards. In Mesoamerican and the Caribbean, increasingly severe storms and hurricanes damage infrastructure and property, and even cause loss of land, reducing access to livelihood resources. In the Columbian Amazon, changes in precipitation and seasonality have direct immediate effects on livelihoods and health, as crops often fail and the reproduction of fish stock is threatened by changes in the river ebb and flow. In the Andean region, water scarcity for crops and livestock, erosion of ecosystems and changes in biodiversity threatens food security, both within indigenous villages and among populations who depend on indigenous agriculture, causing widespread migration to already crowded urban areas. The study aims to increase understanding on the complexity of how indigenous communities are impacted by climate change and the options for improving their resilience and adaptability to these phenomena. The goal is to improve indigenous peoples rights and opportunities in climate change adaptation, and guide efforts to design effective and sustainable adaptation initiatives.

Indigenous In Justice

Author: Ahmad Amara
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0986106224
Size: 75.79 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 5023
Download and Read
Indigenous (In)Justice explores legal and human rights issues surrounding the Bedouin Arab population in Israel's Naqab/Negev desert. With contributions from international scholars, including United Nations officials, the volume examines the economic and social rights of indigenous peoples within the context of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.