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Berber Government

Author: Hugh Roberts
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 1845112512
Size: 67.76 MB
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The Berber identity movement in North Africa was pioneered by the Kabyles of Algeria. But a preoccupation with identity and language has obscured the fact that Kabyle dissidence has been rooted in democratic aspirations inspired by the political traditions of Kabylia itself, a Berber-speaking region in the north of Algeria. The political organisation of pre-colonial Kabylia, from which these traditions originate, was well-described by nineteenth-century French ethnographers. But their inability to explain it led to a trend amongst later theorists of Berber society, such as Ernest Gellner and Pierre Bourdieu, to dismiss Kabylia's political institutions, notably the jema'a (assembly or council), and to reduce Berber politics to a function of social structure and shared religion. In Berber Government, Hugh Roberts, a renowned expert on North Africa, uncovers and explores the remarkable logics of Kabyle political organisation. Combining political anthropology and political and social history in an interdisciplinary analysis, Roberts challenges the excessive emphasis on kinship and religion in the study of the Maghreb.

Berber Government

Author: Hugh Roberts
Publisher: I.B. Tauris
ISBN: 9781784537661
Size: 67.91 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 346
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The Berber identity movement in North Africa was pioneered by the Kabyles of Algeria. But a preoccupation with identity and language has obscured the fact that Kabyle dissidence has been rooted in democratic aspirations inspired by the political traditions of Kabylia itself, a Berber-speaking region in the north of Algeria. The political organisation of pre-colonial Kabylia, from which these traditions originate, was well described by nineteenth-century French authors. But their inability to explain it encouraged later theorists of Berber society, such as Ernest Gellner and Pierre Bourdieu, to dismiss Kabylia's political institutions, notably the jema'a (assembly or council), and to reduce Berber politics to a function of social structure and shared religion. In Berber Government, Hugh Roberts, a renowned expert on North Africa, explores the remarkable logics of Kabyle political organisation and the unusual degree of autonomy it possessed in relation to both kinship divisions and the religious field. This book further offers a pioneering account of the social and political history of Kabylia during the Ottoman period and establishes a radically new way to understand the complex place of the Kabyles in Algerian politics.

Failed Alliances Of The Cold War

Author: Panagiotis Dimitrakis
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 1848859740
Size: 76.30 MB
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The Cold War was a period of intense geopolitical rivalry, in which diplomacy and international relations in Asia and the Middle East acquired huge global significance. In this study, Panagiotis Dimitrakis explores British policy towards SEATO (South East Asia Treaty Organization) and CENTO (Central Treaty Organization). Designed in the 1950s to counter the Soviet Union’s attempts to expand its global influence, these alliances with Asian and Middle Eastern powers were the focus of Western efforts to maintain their regional presence. Yet they failed to bring together the differing aims and ambitions of their regional members, and were dissolved in 1977 and 1979 respectively. This study, based on recently declassified documents, examines the Cold War policies of the United States, Iran, and Turkey as well as Pakistan’s relations with India and the effects of British diplomacy on the war in Vietnam. Charting the repeated failures of Britain and the United States to come to the defence of their allies in Asia and the Middle East, Failed Alliances of the Cold War will be a crucial point of reference for scholars of the Cold War.

The Seljuks Of Anatolia

Author: Andrew Peacock
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 1848858876
Size: 47.91 MB
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One of the most powerful dynasties to rule in the medieval Middle East, the Seljuks played a critical role in the development of Anatolia's multi-ethnic, multi-confessional identity. Under Seljuk rule (c. 1081-1308) the formerly Christian Byzantine territories of Anatolia were transformed by the development of Muslim culture, society and politics, and it was then - well before the arrival of the Ottomans - that a Turkish population became firmly established in these lands. Here, Andrew Peacock and Sara Nur Yildiz explore the history of Anatolia under Seljuk rule in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, examining developments in culture, politics, religion and society and shedding new light on the influence of the dynasty within Anatolia and throughout Western Asia. The Seljuks of Anatolia will therefore be of great interest to researchers with interests in Byzantium as well as the material culture and society of the medieval Islamic world.

Ottoman Haifa

Author: Alex Carmel
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 085773119X
Size: 12.32 MB
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Under Ottoman rule, the city of Haifa, located at the southern point of the largest bay on the coast of Israel, was transformed from a scarcely-inhabited fortress town to a major modern city. Today the city is the third-largest in Israel and has over 250,000 inhabitants. This book details the history of Haifa under the Ottomans during the period 1516-1918. Alex Carmel uses a variety of original sources, including travel literature from the time, to uncover the realities of life in Haifa under Ottoman rule and paints a vivid picture of the development of the city in this era. He shows that it experienced its first significant boom as early as 1761 under Dahar el Omar and that after the establishment of the Württemberg Templer Haifa Colony in 1868, the city began to flourish. The final chapter of the book shows how the city coped with the devastating effects of the Great War and the subsequent fall of the Ottoman Empire and establishment of the British Mandate. Carmel's work has become the benchmark of the historiography of Israel's third largest city and remains to this day, the best-known and most highly-regarded survey of Haifa under Ottoman rule. This, the first English edition of 'Ottoman Haifa', will be essential reading for all historians of the Ottoman Empire and the Middle East.

A Revolutionary Year

Author: William Roger Louis
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 9781860644023
Size: 54.75 MB
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In 1958 the Middle East and the Arab World were in historic crises. Lebanon was in civil turmoil. Iraq underwent a revolution. The Arab world seemed to be splitting from the West and re-aligning itself with the communist world. This collection of essays address the issues raised by the events of that year and their consequences.

Religion And Politics In Modern Iran

Author: Lloyd Ridgeon
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 9781845110734
Size: 78.34 MB
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Covering the last century of Iranian history, this book introduces students to some of the most crucial political and religious texts of the period. Each chapter is preceded by an introduction discussing the significance of the piece and placing each writer in their historical context.

Imperial Identities

Author: Patricia M. E. Lorcin
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 9781860643767
Size: 38.60 MB
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Using colonial Algeria as the starting point of her analysis, Patricia Lorcin explores the manner in which ethnic categories and cultural distinctions are developed and used in society. She focuses on the colonial images of "good" Kabyle and "bad" Arab (usually referred to as the Kabyle Myth) and examines the circumstances out of which they arose, as well as the intellectual and ideological influences which shaped them. Her study demonstrates how these images were used to negate the underlying beliefs and values of the dominated society and to impose French cultural, social and political values. By tracing the evolution of ethnic categories over time, Lorcin reveals their inherently unstable nature and the continual process of redefinition in accordance with circumstance and political or social expediency.

Almohads

Author: Allen James Fromherz
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 0857712071
Size: 40.75 MB
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How did an obscure Islamic visionary found an empire? The Almohad Empire at its zenith in the 12th century was the major power in Mediterranean and North Africa, ruling a huge and disparate region from the Atlas Mountains to Tunisia, Morocco and Andalusia. _x000D_ _x000D_ Allen Fromherz, drawing on medieval Arabic and Berber sources, analyses the history and myths surrounding the rise of the Almohads. He shows how Muhammad Ibn Tumart, the son of an obscure Berber tribal chief, founded his mission to reform Islam - then at a low point in its history, battered by the crusades, having lost Jerusalem and been undermined by weak spiritual and political leadership. Ibn Tumart was proclaimed Mahdi by the Berber tribes, as one who heralded the golden age of Islam. He provided charismatic leadership, and a message of unswerving adherence to absolute monotheism and fundamental Islam, to be enforced by jihad - holy war. He died in 1130, before his dream could be accomplished but his successors quickly built on his foundation, conquering Marrakech - the door to the Sahara gold trade and the greatest city of commerce and trade in North Africa. Ibn Tumart and his legacy were to prove the launch-pad for empire, leading to Almohad domination of the Western Mediterranean from Tunisia to Morocco and Andalusia. It became the seat of a brilliant civilisation, the seed-bed of a 12th-century renaissance and flowering of scholarship which reached far into the Middle East and Europe. _x000D_ _x000D_ Fromherz shows how Tumart formed the sinews of empire - by charismatic leadership, a reformed and powerful Islam, unity based on the closely-knit traditions of the Berber tribes, military power and sound administration. This is the first account of the Almohads in English and will be essential for all who are interested in Islam, the Almohad Empire, North Africa and Middle East, and the lasting cultural effect on the region and on Europe.