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Beyond Black

Author: Ellis Cashmore
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1780931476
Size: 25.86 MB
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Beyond Black is Ellis Cashmore's compelling appraisal of the impact of black celebrities on the cultural landscape of contemporary America. In recent years a new variety of African American celebrity has emerged: acquisitive, ambitious, flamboyantly successful and individualistic - more interested in channelling their energy into career development than into the political struggles that animated some of their predecessors. Bill Cosby and Oprah Winfrey were early examples; current A-listers include Beyoncé and Tiger Woods. The most valuable product these celebrities sell, according to Cashmore, is a particular conception of America: as a nation where racism has been - if not banished - rendered insignificant. Jargon-free but with scholarly attention to theory, evidence and logic, this is a riveting account of contemporary American society, from the minstrel shows of the nineteenth century, through the Hollywood film industry of the 1930s, to today's hip-hop culture.

Beyond Black

Author: Ellis Cashmore
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781780931500
Size: 68.64 MB
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"Beyond Black is Ellis Cashmore's compelling appraisal of the impact of black celebrities on the cultural landscape of post-Obama America. In recent years a new variety of African American celebrity has emerged: acquisitive, ambitious, flamboyantly successful and individualistic - the kind of people who are interested in channelling their energies into their own careers rather than causes like racism. ... At the centre of this book lies the question, "do the conspicuously successful and glittering new class of African Americans herald a new post-racial age?" Cashmore's answer takes him to the minstrel shows of the nineteenth century, the Hollywood film industry of the 1930s and today's hip-hop culture. The most valuable product these celebrities sell, according to Cashmore, is a particular conception of America: as a nation where racism has been - if not banished - rendered insignificant. The lives they lead deliver the evidence. Does racism even matter when almost anyone can possess the commodities associated with the celebrities with whom they identify?"--Publisher's description.

The Black Presidency

Author: Michael Eric Dyson
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0544386426
Size: 16.66 MB
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A provocative and lively deep dive into the meaning of America's first black presidency, from “one of the most graceful and lucid intellectuals writing on race and politics today” (Vanity Fair). Michael Eric Dyson explores the powerful, surprising way the politics of race have shaped Barack Obama’s identity and groundbreaking presidency. How has President Obama dealt publicly with race—as the national traumas of Tamir Rice, Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Freddie Gray, and Walter Scott have played out during his tenure? What can we learn from Obama's major race speeches about his approach to racial conflict and the black criticism it provokes? Dyson explores whether Obama’s use of his own biracialism as a radiant symbol has been driven by the president’s desire to avoid a painful moral reckoning on race. And he sheds light on identity issues within the black power structure, telling the fascinating story of how Obama has spurned traditional black power brokers, significantly reducing their leverage. President Obama’s own voice—from an Oval Office interview granted to Dyson for this book—along with those of Eric Holder, Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson, Andrew Young, and Maxine Waters, among others, add unique depth to this profound tour of the nation’s first black presidency.

Obama S America

Author: Ian Reifowitz
Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.
ISBN: 1612344739
Size: 51.95 MB
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Authors starting point is Obamas speech of July, 2008, The America We Love, and argues that Obama has the potential to have greater impact on how Americans understand their national identity, and define it, than any president since Abraham Lincoln. Includes contrasting visions from both the GOP and Tea Party of what it means to be an American, and why they find Obamas vision so threatening. Authors opinion pieces and articles have appeared in Newsday, The New Republic, History News Network, and the Daily Kos; Markos Moulitsas (kos) has agreed to provide an endorsement for the book (to come).

Race Still Matters

Author: Yuya Kiuchi
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438462735
Size: 10.23 MB
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Essays debunking the notion that contemporary America is a colorblind society. More than half a century after the civil rights era of the mid-1950s to the late 1960s, American society is often characterized as postracial. In other words, that the country has moved away from prejudice based on skin color and we live in a colorblind society. The reality, however, is the opposite. African Americans continue to face both explicit and latent discriminations in housing, healthcare, education, and every facet of their lives. Recent cases involving law enforcement officers shooting unarmed Black men also attest to the reality: the problem of the twenty-first century is still the problem of the color line. In Race Still Matters, contributors drawn from a wide array of disciplines use multidisciplinary methods to explore topics such as Black family experiences, hate crimes, race and popular culture, residual discrimination, economic and occupational opportunity gaps, healthcare disparities, education, law enforcement issues, youth culture, and the depiction of Black female athletes. The volume offers irrefutable evidence that race still very much matters in the United States today.

Elizabeth Taylor

Author: Ellis Cashmore
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1628920688
Size: 53.22 MB
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The first volume to examine the iconic Elizabeth Taylor in this light, Elizabeth Taylor: A Private Life for Public Consumption paints Taylor as the seminal representation of "celebrity.†? A figure of enormous charisma and cultural sway, she intrigued a global audience with her marriages and extra-marital improprieties, as well as her extravagant jewelry, her never-ending illnesses, her dependency on alcohol, and her perplexing friendship with Michael Jackson. Despite her continued world-renown, however, most people would be hard-pressed to name even three of her films, though she made over seventy. Ellis Cashmore traces our modern, hyperactive celebrity culture back to a single instant in Taylor's life: the publicizing of her scandalous affair with Richard Burton by photographer Marcelo Geppetti in 1962, which announced the arrival of a new generation of predatory photojournalists and, along with them, a strange conflation between the public and private lives of celebrities. Taylor's life and public reception, Cashmore reveals, epitomizes the modern phenomenon of "celebrity.†?

Obama S Race

Author: Michael Tesler
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226793834
Size: 18.51 MB
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Barack Obama’s presidential victory naturally led people to believe that the United States might finally be moving into a post-racial era. Obama’s Race—and its eye-opening account of the role played by race in the election—paints a dramatically different picture. The authors argue that the 2008 election was more polarized by racial attitudes than any other presidential election on record—and perhaps more significantly, that there were two sides to this racialization: resentful opposition to and racially liberal support for Obama. As Obama’s campaign was given a boost in the primaries from racial liberals that extended well beyond that usually offered to ideologically similar white candidates, Hillary Clinton lost much of her longstanding support and instead became the preferred candidate of Democratic racial conservatives. Time and again, voters’ racial predispositions trumped their ideological preferences as John McCain—seldom described as conservative in matters of race—became the darling of racial conservatives from both parties. Hard-hitting and sure to be controversial, Obama’s Race will be both praised and criticized—but certainly not ignored.

Disintegration

Author: Eugene Robinson
Publisher: Anchor Books
ISBN: 0767929969
Size: 60.13 MB
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Explains how years of desegregation and affirmative action have led to the revelation of four distinct African American groups who reflect unique political views and circumstances, in a report that also illuminates crucial modern debates on race and class.

Biracial In America

Author: Nikki Khanna
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739145746
Size: 29.24 MB
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Elected in 2008, Barack Obama made history as the first African American President of the United States. Though recognized as the son of his white Kansas-born mother and his Kenyan father, the media and public have nonetheless pigeonholed him as black, and he too self-identifies as such. Obama's experiences as a biracial American with black and white ancestry, although compelling because of his celebrity, however, is not unique and raises several questions about the growing number of black-white biracialAmericans today: How are they perceived by others with regard to race? How do they tend to identify? And why? Taking a social psychological approach, this book identifies influencing factors and several underlying processes shaping racial identity. Unlikeprevious studies which examine racial identity as if it was a one-dimensional concept, this book examines two dimensions of identity - a public dimension (how they identify themselves to others) and an internalized dimension (how they see themselves internally) - noting that both types of identity may not mesh, and in fact, they may be quite different from one another. Moreover, this study investigates the ways in which biracial Americans perform race in their day-to-day lives. One's race isn't simply something that others prescribe onto the individual, but something that individuals "do." The strategies and motivations for performing black, white, and biracial identities are explored.

A Dreadful Deceit

Author: Jacqueline Jones
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465036708
Size: 19.73 MB
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In 1656, a Maryland planter tortured and killed an enslaved man named Antonio, an Angolan who refused to work in the fields. Three hundred years later, Simon P. Owens battled soul-deadening technologies as well as the fiction of “race” that divided him from his co-workers in a Detroit auto-assembly plant. Separated by time and space, Antonio and Owens nevertheless shared a distinct kind of political vulnerability; they lacked rights and opportunities in societies that accorded marked privileges to people labeled “white.” An American creation myth posits that these two black men were the victims of “racial” discrimination, a primal prejudice that the United States has haltingly but gradually repudiated over the course of many generations. In A Dreadful Deceit, award-winning historian Jacqueline Jones traces the lives of Antonio, Owens, and four other African Americans to illustrate the strange history of “race” in America. In truth, Jones shows, race does not exist, and the very factors that we think of as determining it— a person’s heritage or skin color—are mere pretexts for the brutalization of powerless people by the powerful. Jones shows that for decades, southern planters did not even bother to justify slavery by invoking the concept of race; only in the late eighteenth century did whites begin to rationalize the exploitation and marginalization of blacks through notions of “racial” difference. Indeed, race amounted to a political strategy calculated to defend overt forms of discrimination, as revealed in the stories of Boston King, a fugitive in Revolutionary South Carolina; Elleanor Eldridge, a savvy but ill-starred businesswoman in antebellum Providence, Rhode Island; Richard W. White, a Union veteran and Republican politician in post-Civil War Savannah; and William Holtzclaw, founder of an industrial school for blacks in Mississippi, where many whites opposed black schooling of any kind. These stories expose the fluid, contingent, and contradictory idea of race, and the disastrous effects it has had, both in the past and in our own supposedly post-racial society. Expansive, visionary, and provocative, A Dreadful Deceit explodes the pernicious fiction that has shaped four centuries of American history.