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Beyond Privatopia

Author: Evan McKenzie
Publisher: Urban Inst Press
ISBN: 9780877667698
Size: 69.85 MB
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The rise of residential private governance may be the most extensive and dramatic privatization of public life in U.S. history. Private communities, often called common interest developments, are now home to almost one-fifth of the U.S. population--indeed, many localities have mandated that all new development be encompassed in a CID. The ubiquity of private communities has changed the nature of local governance. Residents may like closer control of neighborhood services but may also find themselves contending with intrusions an elected government would not be allowed to make, like a ban on pets or yard decorations. And if things go wrong, the contracts residents must sign to purchase within the community give them little legal recourse. In Beyond Privatopia: Rethinking Residential Private Government, attorney and political science scholar Evan McKenzie explores emerging trends in private governments and competing schools of thought on how to operate them, from state oversight to laissez-faire libertarianism.

Privatopia

Author: Evan McKenzie
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300066388
Size: 68.52 MB
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This book is the first comprehensive study of the political and social issues posed by the rise of common-interest housing developments and their private governments. Tracing the history of this type of housing from the nineteenth century to the present, McKenzie highlights the important but little-understood role public policy has played in advancing this large-scale 'privatization for the few', and he concludes by considering the implications for civil liberties and for politics at all levels of government.

Private Neighborhoods And The Transformation Of Local Government

Author: Robert Henry Nelson
Publisher: The Urban Insitute
ISBN: 9780877667513
Size: 30.31 MB
Format: PDF
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In recent years, private neighborhood associations ("community associations") have become an important part of local government. From 1980 to 2000, half the new housing in the United States was built in a development project governed by a neighborhood association. More than 50 million Americans now live in these associations. In Private Neighborhoods and the Transformation of Local Government, Robert Nelson reviews the history of neighborhood associations, explains the reasons for their recent explosive growth, and speculates on their future role in American society. The book examines the political and economic consequences of this basic change in the manner of American governance at the local level. Unlike many previous studies, Nelson takes on the whole a positive view. Neighborhood associations are providing controls over the neighborhood environment desired by the residents, providing high quality common services, and helping to promote a stronger sense of neighborhood community. Yet, significant operating problems are being experienced in many associations. Private Neighborhoods and the Transformation of Local Government proposes a set of new options for improving the future governance of neighborhood associations. This book provides the most comprehensive report to date on the rise of the neighborhood association as a significant new governing institution in American life.

Private Communities And Urban Governance

Author: Amnon Lehavi
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319332104
Size: 74.43 MB
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This book offers an interdisciplinary and comparative study of the complex interplay between private versus public forms of organization and governance in urban residential developments. Bringing together top experts from numerous disciplines, including law, economics, geography, political science, sociology, and planning, this book identifies the current trends in constructing the physical, economic, and social infrastructure of residential communities across the world. It challenges much of the conventional wisdom about the division of labor between market-driven private action and public policy in regulating residential developments and the urban space, and offers a new research agenda for dealing with the future of cities in the twenty-first century. It represents a unique ongoing academic dialogue between the members of an exceptional group of scholars, underscoring the essentially of an interdisciplinary and comparative approach to the study of private communities and urban governance. As such, the book will appeal to a broad audience consisting of policy-makers, practitioners, scholars, and students across the world, especially in developing countries and transitional and emerging economies.

The Encyclopedia Of Housing Second Edition

Author: Andrew T. Carswell
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1412989574
Size: 71.84 MB
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The second edition of the Encyclopedia of Housing has been updated to reflect the significant changes in the market that make the landscape of the industry so different today, and includes articles from a fresh set of scholars who have contributed to the field over the past twelve years.

Claiming Neighborhood

Author: John Betancur
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252098943
Size: 75.96 MB
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Based on historical case studies in Chicago, John J. Betancur and Janet L. Smith focus both the theoretical and practical explanations for why neighborhoods change today. As the authors show, a diverse collection of people including urban policy experts, elected officials, investors, resident leaders, institutions, community-based organizations, and many others compete to control how neighborhoods change and are characterized. Betancur and Smith argue that neighborhoods have become sites of consumption and spaces to be consumed. Discourse is used to add and subtract value from them. The romanticized image of "the neighborhood" exaggerates or obscures race and class struggles while celebrating diversity and income mixing. Scholars and policy makers must reexamine what sustains this image and the power effects produced in order to explain and govern urban space more equitably.

Beyond Gated Communities

Author: Samer Bagaeen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131765904X
Size: 78.78 MB
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Research on gated communities is moving away from the hard concept of a 'gated community' to the more fluid one of urban gating. The latter allows communities to be viewed through a new lens of soft boundaries, modern communication and networks of influence. The book, written by an international team of experts, builds on the research of Bagaeen and Uduku’s previous edited publication, Gated Communities (Routledge 2010) and relates recent events to trends in urban research, showing how the discussion has moved from privatised to newly collectivised spaces, which have been the focal point for events such as the Occupy London movement and the Arab Spring. Communities are now more mobilised and connected than ever, and Beyond Gated Communities shows how neighbourhoods can become part of a global network beyond their own gates. With chapters on Australia, Canada, Europe, South America, Asia, Africa and the Middle East, this is a truly international resource for scholars and students of urban studies interested in this dynamic, growing area of research.

No Simple Solutions

Author: Susan J. Popkin
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442268832
Size: 45.28 MB
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This book tells the story of how an ambitious—and risky—social experiment affected the lives of the people it was ultimately intended to benefit: the residents who had suffered through the worst days of crime, decay, and rampant mismanagement of the Chicago Housing Authority (CHA), and now had to face losing the only home many of them had known.