Download beyond the gateway immigrants in a changing america program in migration and refugee studies in pdf or read beyond the gateway immigrants in a changing america program in migration and refugee studies in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get beyond the gateway immigrants in a changing america program in migration and refugee studies in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Beyond The Gateway

Author: Elzbieta M. Gozdziak
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9780739106365
Size: 48.25 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 5313
Download and Read
A small but growing number of immigrants today are moving into new settlement areas, such as Winchester, Va., Greensboro, N.C., and Salt Lake City, Utah, that lack a tradition of accepting newcomers. Just as the process is difficult and distressing for the immigrants, it is likewise a significant cause of stress for the regions in which they settle. Long homogeneous communities experience overnight changes in their populations and in the demands placed on schools, housing, law enforcement, social services, and other aspects of infrastructure. Institutions have not been well prepared to cope. Local governments have not had any significant experience with newcomers and nongovernmental organizations have been overburdened or simply nonexistent. There has been a substantial amount of discussion about these new settlement areas during the past decade, but relatively little systematic examination of the effects of immigration or the policy and programmatic responses to it. New Immigrant Communities is the first effort to bridge the gaps in communication not only between the immigrants and the institutions with which they interact, but also among diverse communities across the United States dealing with the same stresses but ignorant of each others' responses, whether successes or failures.

New Immigrants Changing Communities

Author: Elzbieta M. Gozdziak
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9780739106372
Size: 35.84 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 6404
Download and Read
This handbook provides a review of promising practices and strategies facilitating immigrant integration, especially in new settlement areas. The purpose of this handbook is to foster a constructive approach to newcomers and community change.

Mexico U S Migration Management

Author: Augustín Escobar Latapí
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739130595
Size: 36.63 MB
Format: PDF
View: 3104
Download and Read
The need to understand the migration between the United States and Mexico is greater today than at any time in its century long history. Its volume and complexity are greater than most observers might have imagined even a decade ago; and it operates in a context charged with serious human, political, and security challenges. Yet, there is often confusion over the most fundamental questions about the demography, economics, and political nature of the movement and its policy responses. The editors of this book bring together a team of top policy-oriented migration experts from Mexico and the United States to provide an up-to-date analysis leading to grounded policy recommendations for both governments. Their conclusions derive from new analyses as well as from detailed discussions with policy-makers. Contributors assess the main characteristics, trends, and factors influencing Mexico-U.S. migration and recommend actions that should improve migration management, substantially reduce undocumented flows, and refocus Mexican migration into legal channels. Also contained within this book are recommendations of development strategies in Mexico that should reduce mid- to long-term emigration pressures. The book shows that collaboration between the U.S. and Mexico is not only possible, but necessary, as unilateral reforms will continue to fail until both governments act together to regulate the flow, improve conditions for the migrants, and make sure that migration has positive social and economic impacts on both countries.

Twenty First Century Gateways

Author: Audrey Singer
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 0815779283
Size: 67.27 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 5302
Download and Read
While federal action on immigration faces an uncertain future, states, cities and suburban municipalities craft their own responses to immigration. Twenty-First-Century Gateways, focuses on the fastest-growing immigrant populations in metropolitan areas with previously low levels of immigration—places such as Atlanta, Austin, Charlotte, Dallas-Fort Worth, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Phoenix, Portland, Sacramento, and Washington, D.C. These places are typical of the newest, largest immigrant gateways to America, characterized by post-WWII growth, recent burgeoning immigrant populations, and predominantly suburban settlement. More immigrants, both legal and undocumented, arrived in the United States during the 1990s than in any other decade on record. That growth has continued more slowly since the Great Recession; nonetheless the U.S. immigrant population has doubled since 1990. Many immigrants continued to move into traditional urban centers such as New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, but burgeoning numbers were attracted by the economic and housing opportunities of fast-growing metropolitan areas and their largely suburban settings. The pace of change in this new geography of immigration has presented many local areas with challenges—social, fiscal, and political. Edited by Audrey Singer, Susan W. Hardwick, and Caroline B. Brettell, Twenty-First-Century Gateways provides in-depth, comparative analysis of immigration trends and local policy responses in America's newest gateways. The case examples by a group of leading multidisciplinary immigration scholars explore the challenges of integrating newcomers in the specific gateways, as well as their impact on suburban infrastructure such as housing, transportation, schools, health care, economic development, and public safety. The changes and trends dissected in this book present a critically important understanding of the reshaping of the United States today and the future impact of immigration, vital as the nation and metropolitan areas face changes to immigration policy.

Americans At The Gate

Author: Carl J. Bon Tempo
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691123322
Size: 47.76 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 767
Download and Read
Unlike the 1930s, when the United States tragically failed to open its doors to Europeans fleeing Nazism, the country admitted over three million refugees during the Cold War. This dramatic reversal gave rise to intense political and cultural battles, pitting refugee advocates against determined opponents who at times successfully slowed admissions. The first comprehensive historical exploration of American refugee affairs from the midcentury to the present, Americans at the Gate explores the reasons behind the remarkable changes to American refugee policy, laws, and programs. Carl Bon Tempo looks at the Hungarian, Cuban, and Indochinese refugee crises, and he examines major pieces of legislation, including the Refugee Relief Act and the 1980 Refugee Act. He argues that the American commitment to refugees in the post-1945 era occurred not just because of foreign policy imperatives during the Cold War, but also because of particular domestic developments within the United States such as the Red Scare, the Civil Rights Movement, the rise of the Right, and partisan electoral politics. Using a wide variety of sources and documents, Americans at the Gate considers policy and law developments in connection with the organization and administration of refugee programs.

Children And Migration

Author: Marisa O. Ensor
Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan
ISBN:
Size: 57.54 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 2310
Download and Read
Providing a comprehensive analysis of the increasingly common phenomenon of child migration, this volume examines the experiences of children in a wide variety of migratory circumstances including economic child migrants, transnational students, trafficked, stateless, fostered, unaccompanied and undocumented children.

Guarding The Golden Door

Author: Roger Daniels
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 1466806850
Size: 53.24 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 1555
Download and Read
As renowned historian Roger Daniels shows in this brilliant new work, America's inconsistent, often illogical, and always cumbersome immigration policy has profoundly affected our recent past. The federal government's efforts to pick and choose among the multitude of immigrants seeking to enter the United States began with the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. Conceived in ignorance and falsely presented to the public, it had undreamt of consequences, and this pattern has been rarely deviated from since. Immigration policy in Daniels' skilled hands shows Americans at their best and worst, from the nativist violence that forced Theodore Roosevelt's 1907 "gentlemen's agreement" with Japan to the generous refugee policies adopted after World War Two and throughout the Cold War. And in a conclusion drawn from today's headlines, Daniels makes clear how far ignorance, partisan politics, and unintended consequences have overtaken immigration policy during the current administration's War on Terror. Irreverent, deeply informed, and authoritative, Guarding the Golden Door presents an unforgettable interpretation of modern American history.

Angel Island

Author: Erika Lee
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199752799
Size: 29.95 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 569
Download and Read
From 1910 to 1940, over half a million people sailed through the Golden Gate, hoping to start a new life in America. But they did not all disembark in San Francisco; instead, most were ferried across the bay to the Angel Island Immigration Station. For many, this was the real gateway to the United States. For others, it was a prison and their final destination, before being sent home. In this landmark book, historians Erika Lee and Judy Yung (both descendants of immigrants detained on the island) provide the first comprehensive history of the Angel Island Immigration Station. Drawing on extensive new research, including immigration records, oral histories, and inscriptions on the barrack walls, the authors produce a sweeping yet intensely personal history of Chinese "paper sons," Japanese picture brides, Korean students, South Asian political activists, Russian and Jewish refugees, Mexican families, Filipino repatriates, and many others from around the world. Their experiences on Angel Island reveal how America's discriminatory immigration policies changed the lives of immigrants and transformed the nation. A place of heartrending history and breathtaking beauty, the Angel Island Immigration Station is a National Historic Landmark, and like Ellis Island, it is recognized as one of the most important sites where America's immigration history was made. This fascinating history is ultimately about America itself and its complicated relationship to immigration, a story that continues today.

The Integration Of Immigrants Into American Society

Author: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309373980
Size: 42.29 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 2338
Download and Read
The United States prides itself on being a nation of immigrants, and the country has a long history of successfully absorbing people from across the globe. The integration of immigrants and their children contributes to our economic vitality and our vibrant and ever changing culture. We have offered opportunities to immigrants and their children to better themselves and to be fully incorporated into our society and in exchange immigrants have become Americans - embracing an American identity and citizenship, protecting our country through service in our military, fostering technological innovation, harvesting its crops, and enriching everything from the nation's cuisine to its universities, music, and art. Today, the 41 million immigrants in the United States represent 13.1 percent of the U.S. population. The U.S.-born children of immigrants, the second generation, represent another 37.1 million people, or 12 percent of the population. Thus, together the first and second generations account for one out of four members of the U.S. population. Whether they are successfully integrating is therefore a pressing and important question. Are new immigrants and their children being well integrated into American society, within and across generations? Do current policies and practices facilitate their integration? How is American society being transformed by the millions of immigrants who have arrived in recent decades? To answer these questions, this new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine summarizes what we know about how immigrants and their descendants are integrating into American society in a range of areas such as education, occupations, health, and language.