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Black Families At The Crossroads

Author: Leanor Boulin Johnson
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780787976316
Size: 25.43 MB
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This updated edition of the classic book Black Families at the Crossroads, offers a comprehensive examination of the diverse and complex issues surrounding Black families. Leanor Boulin Johnson and Robert Staples combine more than sixty years of writing and research on Black families to offer insights into the pre-slavery development of the Black middle class, internal processes that affect all class strata among Black American families, the impact of race on modern Black immigrant families, the interaction of external forces and internal norms at each stage of the Black family life cycle, and public policies that provide challenges and promising prospects for the continuing resilience of the Black family as an American institution. This thoroughly revised edition features new research, including empirical studies and theoretical applications, and a review of significant social polices and economic changes in the past decade and their impact on Black families.

Double Burden Black Women And Everyday Racism

Author: Yanick St Jean
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317472829
Size: 68.22 MB
Format: PDF
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Studies of contemporary black women are rare and scattered, and are often extensions of a legacy beginning in the 19th century that characterized black women as domineering matriarchs, prostitutes, or welfare queens, negative characterizations that are perpetuated by both white and non-white social scientists. Based on over 200 interviews, this book departs from these conventions in significant ways, and, using a "collective memory" conceptual framework, shows how black women cope with and interpret lives often limited by racial barriers not of their making.

The Strengths Of Black Families

Author: Robert Bernard Hill
Publisher: University Press of America
ISBN: 9780761824688
Size: 31.88 MB
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This book was first published in 1972 when the author was Director of Research for the National Urban League, which was headed by Mr. Vernon E. Jordan, Executive Director. As a result of widespread acceptance of the 1965 report on the Negro family by Daniel Moynihan, most black families were still depicted by the media in the early 1970's as weak, dysfunctional and devoid of any strengths. This book was written to provide a rare perspective by focusing on the assets and resilience of black families. Over the past three decades, this book has stimulated numerous studies of the strengths of African American, Hispanic American, Asian American and Native American families. While the 1999 sequel has been favorably received, the author continues to receive numerous requests for copies of the original work that has been out of print for many years. Therefore, this reprint edition also includes an epilogue, "Thirty Years Later," which describes the impact of social forces and policies on the social and economic status of African American families since the 1970's. It also examines the role of the five cultural strengths on the functioning of contemporary African American families.

Black Families

Author: Harriette Pipes McAdoo
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1452279039
Size: 22.32 MB
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Following the success of its best-selling predecessors, the Fourth Edition of Harriette Pipes McAdoo's Black Families retains several now classic contributions while including updated versions of earlier chapters and many entirely new chapters. The goal through each revision of this core text has been to compile a book that focuses on positive dimensions of African American families. The book remains the most complete assessment of black families available in both depth and breadth of coverage. Cross-disciplinary in nature, the book boasts contributions from such fields as family studies, anthropology, education, psychology, social work, and public policy.

Family Therapy

Author: Janice M. Rasheed
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 148330535X
Size: 57.36 MB
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This text offers a straightforward, comprehensive overview of both traditional and evolving theoretical models of family therapy and intervention techniques as well as a discussion of clinical issues unique to family therapy practice. Aiming to prepare students to develop beginning proficiency in family therapy, the authors outline major family therapy models in detail, including a step by step description of concepts, theories, skills, and techniques as well as a history of each model and its conceptual and theoretical underpinnings. The text also provides extensive case illustrations of family interviews that identify the specific stages, clinical issues, concepts, theories and techniques associated with each model. This core text is designed for graduate level courses such as Family Therapy, Marriage and Family Therapy, Marriage and Family Counseling, Family Systems Theory, and Family Counseling in departments of social work, psychology, nursing, education, or human services.

Black Working Wives

Author: Bart Landry
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520929692
Size: 72.59 MB
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Long before the 1970s and the feminist revolution that shattered traditional notions of the family, black women in America had already accomplished their own revolution. Bart Landry's groundbreaking study adds immeasurably to our accepted concepts of "traditional" and "new" families: Landry argues that black middle-class women in two-parent families were practicing an egalitarian lifestyle that was envisioned by few of their white counterparts until many decades later. The primary transformation of the American family, Landry says, took place when nineteenth-century industrialization brought about the separation of home and workplace. Only then did the family we call traditional, in which the husband goes out to work while the wife stays at home, become the centerpiece of white middle-class ideology. Black women, excluded from this model of respectability, embraced a threefold commitment to family, community, and career. They embodied the notion that employment outside the home was the route to more equality in the home, and that work was worth pursuing for reasons other than economic survival. With a careful and convincing mix of biography, historical records, and demographic data, Landry shows how these black pioneers of the dual-career marriage created a paradigm for other women seeking to escape the cult of domesticity and thus foreshadowed the second great family transformation. If the two-parent nuclear family is to persist beyond the twentieth century, it may be because of what we can learn from these earlier women about an ideology of womanhood that combines the private and public spheres.