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Black Jewish Relations In African American And Jewish American Fiction

Author: Adam Meyer
Publisher: Scarecrow Press
ISBN: 9780810842182
Size: 55.97 MB
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Including 410 entries-drawn from over 100 years of novels, short stories, plays, and children's and young adult literature-this bibliography demonstrates both the extent and the richness of the fiction which has been written about Black-Jewish relations in America, thus enhancing our view of American ethnic literature as a whole.

Imagining Each Other

Author: Ethan Goffman
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 0791492079
Size: 19.45 MB
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Explores the complex ways in which Blacks and Jews have portrayed each other in recent American literature.

Facing Black And Jew

Author: Adam Zachary Newton
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521658706
Size: 28.20 MB
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Reading the work of African American and Jewish American authors alongside and through one another.

The Cambridge History Of Jewish American Literature

Author: Hana Wirth-Nesher
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316395340
Size: 34.94 MB
Format: PDF
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This History offers an unparalleled examination of all aspects of Jewish American literature. Jewish writing has played a central role in the formation of the national literature of the United States, from the Hebraic sources of the Puritan imagination to narratives of immigration and acculturation. This body of writing has also enriched global Jewish literature in its engagement with Jewish history and Jewish multilingual culture. Written by a host of leading scholars, The Cambridge History of Jewish American Literature offers an array of approaches that contribute to current debates about ethnic writing, minority discourse, transnational literature, gender studies, and multilingualism. This History takes a fresh look at celebrated authors, introduces new voices, locates Jewish American literature on the map of American ethnicity as well as the spaces of exile and diaspora, and stretches the boundaries of American literature beyond the Americas and the West.

The White Negress

Author: Lori Harrison-Kahan
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813547822
Size: 14.80 MB
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During the first half of the twentieth century, American Jews demonstrated a commitment to racial justice as well as an attraction to African American culture. Until now, the debate about whether such black-Jewish encounters thwarted or enabled Jews' claims to white privilege has focused on men and representations of masculinity while ignoring questions of women and femininity. The White Negress investigates literary and cultural texts by Jewish and African American women, opening new avenues of inquiry that yield more complex stories about Jewishness, African American identity, and the meanings of whiteness. Lori Harrison-Kahan examines writings by Edna Ferber, Fannie Hurst, and Zora Neale Hurston, as well as the blackface performances of vaudevillian Sophie Tucker and controversies over the musical and film adaptations of Show Boat and Imitation of Life. Moving between literature and popular culture, she illuminates how the dynamics of interethnic exchange have at once produced and undermined the binary of black and white.

Judaica Reference Sources

Author: Charles Cutter
Publisher: Libraries Unlimited
ISBN: 9781591581338
Size: 71.48 MB
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A recipient of the Outstanding Reference Award from the Association of Jewish Librarians in its earlier edition, this updated edition of "Judaica Reference Sources" maintains its editorial excellence while revising and expanding coverage for the new century. Virtually every aspect of Jewish life, knowledge, history, culture, religion, and contemporary issues is covered in this annotated, bibliographic guide. A critical collection development tool for college, university, public school, and synagogue libraries, "Judaica Reference Sources" provides entries for over 1,000 reference works, as well as a selective list of related Web sites, in English, French, German, Yiddish, and Hebrew. Works published since 1970 are emphasized. Unique in providing expert guidance to Judaica material for the librarian, the layperson, the student, and the researcher, this reference guide is a versatile tool that will fulfill your every need for Judaica material.

Black Jewish Relations On Trial

Author: Jeffrey Paul Melnick
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 9781604735956
Size: 43.62 MB
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An analysis of the Leo Frank case as a measure of the complexities characterizing the relationship between African Americans and Jews in America In 1915 Leo Frank, a Northern Jew, was lynched in Georgia. He had been convicted of the murder of Mary Phagan, a young white woman who worked in the Atlanta pencil factory managed by Frank. In a tumultuous trial in 1913 Frank's main accuser was Jim Conley, an African American employee in the factory. Was Frank guilty? In our time a martyr's aura falls over Frank as a victim of religious and regional bigotry. The unending controversy has inspired debates, movies, books, songs, and theatrical productions. Among the creative works focused on the case are a ballad by Fiddlin' John Carson, David Mamet's novel "The Old Religion" in 1997, and Alfred Uhry and Jason Robert Brown's musical "Parade" in 1998. Indeed, the Frank case has become a touchstone in the history of black-Jewish cultural relations. How- ever, for too long the trial has been oversimplified as the moment when Jews recognized their vulnerability in America and began to make common cause with African Americans. This study has a different tale to tell. It casts off old political and cultural baggage in order to assess the cultural context of Frank's trial, and to examine the stress placed on the relationship of African Americans and Jews by it. The interpretation offered here is based on deep archival research, analyses of the court records, and study of various artistic creations inspired by the case. It suggests that the case should be understood as providing conclusive early evidence of the deep mutual distrust between African Americans and Jews, a distrust that has been skillfully and cynically manipulated by powerful white people. "Black-Jewish Relations on Trial" is concerned less with what actually happened in the National Pencil Company factory than with how Frank's trial, conviction, and lynching have been used as an occasion to explore black-Jewish relations and the New South. Just as with the O. J. Simpson trial, the Frank trial requires that Americans make a profound examination of their essential beliefs about race, sexuality, and power. Jeffrey Melnick is an assistant professor of American studies at Babson College and the author of "A Right to Sing the Blues: African Americans, Jews, and American Popular Song."

Growing Up Ethnic

Author: Martin Japtok
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 1587295946
Size: 76.96 MB
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Growing Up Ethnic examines the presence of literary similarities between African American and Jewish American coming-of-age stories in the first half of the twentieth century; often these similarities exceed what could be explained by sociohistorical correspondences alone. Martin Japtok argues that these similarities result from the way both African American and Jewish American authors have conceptualized their "ethnic situation." The issue of "race" and its social repercussions certainly defy any easy comparisons. However, the fact that the ethnic situations are far from identical in the case of these two groups only highlights the striking thematic correspondences in how a number of African American and Jewish American coming-of-age stories construct ethnicity. Japtok studies three pairs of novels--James Weldon Johnson's Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man and Samuel Ornitz's Haunch, Paunch and Jowl, Jessie Fauset's Plum Bun and Edna Ferber's Fanny Herself, and Paule Marshall's Brown Girl, Brownstones and Anzia Yezierska's Bread Giver--and argues that the similarities can be explained with reference to mainly two factors, ultimately intertwined: cultural nationalism and the Bildungsroman genre. Growing Up Ethnic shows that the parallel configurations in the novels, which often see ethnicity in terms of spirituality, as inherent artistic ability, and as communal responsibility, are rooted in nationalist ideology. However, due to the authors' generic choice--the Bildungsroman--the tendency to view ethnicity through the rhetorical lens of communalism and spiritual essence runs head-on into the individualist assumptions of the protagonist-centered Bildungsroman. The negotiations between these ideological counterpoints characterize the novels and reflect and refract the intellectual ferment of their time. This fresh look at ethnic American literatures in the context of cultural nationalism and the Bildungsroman will be of great interest to students and scholars of literary and race studies.