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Bloodland

Author: Dennis McAuliffe
Publisher: Council Oak Books
ISBN: 9781571780836
Size: 30.78 MB
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Journalist Dennis McAuliffe, Jr. opens old family wounds and ultimately exposes a widespread murder conspiracy and shameful episode in American history.

A Pipe For February

Author: Charles H. Red Corn
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806137261
Size: 60.77 MB
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At the turn of the twentieth century, the Osage Indians were traditional tribal people who owned Oklahoma's most valuable oil reserves. During the 1920s, they became members of the wealthy oil population. Tracing the experiences of John Grayeagle, a young Osage, Charles Red Corn, describes the Osage experience of the 1920s.

Killers Of The Flower Moon

Author: David Grann
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0385534256
Size: 68.24 MB
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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST "Disturbing and riveting...It will sear your soul." —Dave Eggers, New York Times Book Review SHELF AWARENESS'S BEST BOOK OF 2017 Named a best book of the year by Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, San Francisco Chronicle, GQ, Time, Newsday, Entertainment Weekly, Time Magazine, NPR's Maureen Corrigan, NPR's "On Point," Vogue, Smithsonian, Cosmopolitan, Seattle Times, Bloomberg, Lit Hub's "Ultimate Best Books," Library Journal, Paste, Kirkus, Slate.com and Book Browse From New Yorker staff writer David Grann, #1 New York Times best-selling author of The Lost City of Z, a twisting, haunting true-life murder mystery about one of the most monstrous crimes in American history In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances. In this last remnant of the Wild West—where oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the “Phantom Terror,” roamed—many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization’s first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection. Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. In Killers of the Flower Moon, David Grann revisits a shocking series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood. Based on years of research and startling new evidence, the book is a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, as each step in the investigation reveals a series of sinister secrets and reversals. But more than that, it is a searing indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long. Killers of the Flower Moon is utterly compelling, but also emotionally devastating.

A Few Dead Indians

Author: Bob Lambert
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 9781495252440
Size: 27.84 MB
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A dead body discovered in an abandoned house on Southeast 29th Street in Oklahoma City. In a city and a state where crime and violence were common, it might have seemed routine. But death—especially murder—is never routine, and the investigation of this particular death led young Oklahoma City detective Walter Gage on a journey he could never have imagined. 1920's. Oklahoma. Oil. Boomtowns spring up almost overnight. Drillers, roughnecks, landmen—and gangsters, prostitutes, con-men, all following the money. And there was a lot. When the American government moved members of the Osage tribe into northern Oklahoma, it had no intention of making the Osage, as a group, the wealthiest people in the world. The land itself was wonderful for cattle, covered as it was with Big Bluegrass, Little Bluegrass, and Switchgrass, some growing to four or five feet in height and highly nutritious. But it wasn't what was on top of the land that made the Osage rich; it was what was beneath it: oil. Oklahoma, not long a state, was booming. Oil wells were popping up in many areas of the state. Towns that had existed only as small farming communities or had not existed at all were suddenly bustling cities. Many of the huge oil companies that were familiar names in America for most of the twentieth century got their starts in the Oklahoma oil fields. So lots of people got rich. The Osage tribe was in a rather special position. Their treaties with the United States government meant that royalties from oil taken from Osage land went, not to the landholder, but to the tribe as a whole. That royalty money was then distributed to all tribal members equally.That meant, in a way, that although a few landholders might have actually received less royalty money than they would have under the usual circumstances, it also meant that every adult member of the Osage tribe rather quickly became wealthy. Wealthy? Millionaires, each and every one. What did this mean to people who were, by American standards, scarcely “civilized”? In simple terms, it meant that they were prey. A Few Dead Indians is the story of the long delayed investigation into the murders of at least twenty members of the Osage tribe, the beginning of the Oklahoma Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation, and the life and involvement of young agent Walter Gage.

Children Of The Dragonfly

Author: Robert Bensen
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 9780816520121
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Sometimes the losses of childhood can be recovered only in the flight of the dragonfly.Native American children have long been subject to removal from their homes for placement in residential schools and, more recently, in foster or adoptive homes. The governments of both the United States and Canada, having reduced Native nations to the legal status of dependent children, historically have asserted a surrogate parentalism over Native children themselves. Children of the Dragonfly is the first anthology to document this struggle for cultural survival on both sides of the U.S.-Canadian border. Through autobiography and interviews, fiction and traditional tales, official transcripts and poetry, these voicesÑ Seneca, Cherokee, Mohawk, Navajo, and many othersÑ weave powerful accounts of struggle and loss into a moving testimony to perseverance and survival. Invoking the dragonfly spirit of Zuni legend who helps children restore a way of life that has been taken from them, the anthology explores the breadth of the conflict about Native childhood. Included are works of contemporary authors Sherman Alexie, Joy Harjo, Luci Tapahonso, and others; classic writers Zitkala-Sa and E. Pauline Johnson; and contributions from twenty important new writers as well. They take readers from the boarding school movement of the 1870s to the Sixties Scoop in Canada and the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 in the United States. They also spotlight the tragic consequences of racist practices such as the suppression of Indian identity in government schools and the campaign against Indian childbearing through involuntary sterilization. CONTENTS Part 1. Traditional Stories and Lives Severt Young Bear (Lakota) and R. D. Theisz, To Say "Child" Zitkala-Sa (Yankton Sioux), The Toad and the Boy Delia Oshogay (Chippewa), Oshkikwe's Baby Michele Dean Stock (Seneca), The Seven Dancers Mary Ulmer Chiltoskey (Cherokee), Goldilocks Thereafter Marietta Brady (Navajo), Two Stories Part 2. Boarding and Residential Schools Embe (Marianna Burgess), from Stiya: or, a Carlisle Indian Girl at Home Black Bear (Blackfeet), Who Am I? E. Pauline Johnson (Mohawk), As It Was in the Beginning Lee Maracle (Stoh:lo), Black Robes Gordon D. Henry, Jr. (White Earth Chippewa), The Prisoner of Haiku Luci Tapahonso (Navajo), The Snakeman Joy Harjo (Muskogee), The Woman Who Fell from the Sky Part 3. Child Welfare and Health Services Problems That American Indian Families Face in Raising Their Children, United States Senate, April 8 and 9, 1974 Mary TallMountain (Athabaskan), Five Poems Virginia Woolfclan, Missing Sister Lela Northcross Wakely (Potawatomi/Kickapoo), Indian Health Sherman Alexie (Spokane/Coeur d'Alene), from Indian Killer Milton Lee (Cheyenne River Sioux) and Jamie Lee, The Search for Indian Part 4. Children of the Dragonfly Peter Cuch (Ute), I Wonder What the Car Looked Like S. L. Wilde (Anishnaabe), A Letter to My Grandmother Eric Gansworth (Onondaga), It Goes Something Like This Kimberly Roppolo (Cherokee/Choctaw/Creek), Breeds and Outlaws Phil Young (Cherokee) and Robert Bensen, Wetumka Lawrence Sampson (Delaware/Eastern Band Cherokee), The Long Road Home Beverley McKiver (Ojibway), When the Heron Speaks Joyce carlEtta Mandrake (White Earth Chippewa), Memory Lane Is the Next Street Over Alan Michelson (Mohawk), Lost Tribe Patricia Aqiimuk Paul (Inupiaq), The Connection Terry Trevor (Cherokee/Delaware/Seneca), Pushing up the Sky Annalee Lucia Bensen (Mohegan/Cherokee), Two Dragonfly Dream Songs

Osage And Settler

Author: Janet Berry Hess
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786495820
Size: 63.47 MB
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Drawing on a rare family archive and archival material from the Osage Nation, this book documents a unique relationship among white settlers, the Osage and African Americans in Oklahoma. The history of white settlement and colonization is often discussed in the context of the cultural erasure of, and violence perpetuated against, American Indians and enslaved blacks. Conversely, histories of American Indian nations often end with colonial conquest, and exclude the experiences of white settlers. The author's anthropological approach examines the lived experience of individuals--including her own family members--and their nuanced and intersecting relationships as they negotiate cultural and geographic landscapes of oppression and technological change. The art, architecture, body ornamentation, sacred objects, ceremonies and performances accompanying this transformation are all addressed.

John Joseph Mathews

Author: Michael Snyder
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806158840
Size: 71.97 MB
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John Joseph Mathews (1894–1979) is one of Oklahoma’s most revered twentieth-century authors. An Osage Indian, he was also one of the first Indigenous authors to gain national renown. Yet fame did not come easily to Mathews, and his personality was full of contradictions. In this captivating biography, Michael Snyder provides the first book-length account of this fascinating figure. Known as “Jo” to all his friends, Mathews had a multifaceted identity. A novelist, naturalist, biographer, historian, and tribal preservationist, he was a true “man of letters.” Snyder draws on a wealth of sources, many of them previously untapped, to narrate Mathews’s story. Much of the writer’s family life—especially his two marriages and his relationships with his two children and two stepchildren—is explored here for the first time. Born in the town of Pawhuska in Indian Territory, Mathews attended the University of Oklahoma before venturing abroad and earning a second degree from Oxford. He served as a flight instructor during World War I, traveled across Europe and northern Africa, and bought and sold land in California. A proud Osage who devoted himself to preserving Osage culture, Mathews also served as tribal councilman and cultural historian for the Osage Nation. Like many gifted artists, Mathews was not without flaws. And perhaps in the eyes of some critics, he occupies a nebulous space in literary history. Through insightful analysis of his major works, especially his semiautobiographical novel Sundown and his meditative Talking to the Moon, Snyder revises this impression. The story he tells, of one remarkable individual, is also the story of the Osage Nation, the state of Oklahoma, and Native America in the twentieth century.

The Osage

Author: Willard H. Rollings
Publisher: University of Missouri Press
ISBN: 9780826210067
Size: 52.31 MB
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The Osage Indians were a powerful group of Native Americans who lived along the prairies and plains of present-day Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Arkansas. The Osage: An Ethnohistorical Study of Hegemony on the Prairie-Plains, now available in paper, shows how the Osage formed and maintained political, economic, and social control over a large portion of the central United States for more than 150 years.

Colonial Entanglement

Author: Jean Dennison
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 080783744X
Size: 11.26 MB
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From 2004 to 2006 the Osage Nation conducted a contentious governmental reform process in which sharply differing visions arose over the new government's goals, the Nation's own history, and what it means to be Osage. The primary debates were focused on biology, culture, natural resources, and sovereignty. Osage anthropologist Jean Dennison documents the reform process in order to reveal the lasting effects of colonialism and to illuminate the possibilities for indigenous sovereignty. In doing so, she brings to light the many complexities of defining indigenous citizenship and governance in the twenty-first century. By situating the 2004-6 Osage Nation reform process within its historical and current contexts, Dennison illustrates how the Osage have creatively responded to continuing assaults on their nationhood. A fascinating account of a nation in the midst of its own remaking, Colonial Entanglement presents a sharp analysis of how legacies of European invasion and settlement in North America continue to affect indigenous people's views of selfhood and nationhood.

The Secret Token

Author: Andrew Lawler
Publisher: Doubleday
ISBN: 038554202X
Size: 70.48 MB
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A sweeping account of America's oldest unsolved mystery, the people racing to unearth its answer, and the sobering truths--about race, gender, and immigration--exposed by the Lost Colony of Roanoke In 1587, 115 men, women, and children arrived at Roanoke Island on the coast of North Carolina. Chartered by Queen Elizabeth I, their colony was to establish England's first foothold in the New World. But when the colony's leader, John White, returned to Roanoke from a resupply mission, his settlers were nowhere to be found. They left behind only a single clue--a "secret token" carved into a tree. Neither White nor any other European laid eyes on the colonists again. What happened to the Lost Colony of Roanoke? For four hundred years, that question has consumed historians and amateur sleuths, leading only to dead ends and hoaxes. But after a chance encounter with a British archaeologist, journalist Andrew Lawler discovered that solid answers to the mystery were within reach. He set out to unravel the enigma of the lost settlers, accompanying competing researchers, each hoping to be the first to solve its riddle. In the course of his journey, Lawler encounters a host of characters obsessed with the colonists and their fate, and he determines why the Lost Colony continues to haunt our national consciousness. Thrilling and absorbing, The Secret Token offers a new understanding not just of the first English settlement in the New World but of how its disappearance continues to define--and divide--America.