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Call To Juno

Author: Elisabeth Storrs
Publisher: Lake Union Publishing
ISBN: 9781503951952
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"Call to Juno is a stirring saga of war, sacrifice, and transcendent love." --M. Louisa Locke, author of the Victorian San Francisco Mystery series Four unforgettable characters are tested during a war between Rome and Etruscan Veii. Caecilia has long been torn between her birthplace of Rome and her adopted city of Veii. Yet faced with mounting danger to her husband, children, and Etruscan freedoms, will her call to destroy Rome succeed? Pinna has clawed her way from prostitute to the concubine of the Roman general Camillus. Deeply in love, can she exert her own power to survive the threat of exposure by those who know her sordid past? Semni, a servant, seeks forgiveness for a past betrayal. Will she redeem herself so she can marry the man she loves? Marcus, a Roman tribune, is tormented by unrequited love for another soldier. Can he find strength to choose between his cousin Caecilia and his fidelity to Rome? Who will overcome the treachery of mortals and gods? Call to Juno is the third book in the series A Tale of Ancient Rome, which includes The Wedding Shroud and The Golden Dice.

Die Vergessene Legion

Author: Ben Kane
Publisher: BASTEI LÜBBE
ISBN: 3732514803
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IHR KAMPF FÜR FREIHEIT, EHRE UND VERGELTUNG BEGINNT Rom, 56 v. Chr. Die Zwillinge Romulus und Fabiola sind Sklaven. Als 13-Jährige werden sie getrennt: Fabiola wird an ein Bordell verkauft, Romulus an eine Gladiatorenschule. Dort freundet der junge Sklave sich mit Brennus an, dem besten Gladiator Roms. Als Romulus beschuldigt wird, einen Patrizier ermordet zu haben, flüchten die beiden Freunde gemeinsam. Sie schließen sich Auxiliartruppen an, die weit nach Osten ziehen. Noch ahnen Romulus und Brennus nicht, was sie am Ende der Reise erwartet: ein Platz in der Vergessenen Legion, dem größten Mysterium der römischen Antike. Auftakt einer historischen Abenteuerserie von Bestsellerautor Ben Kane

Das Goldene Meer

Author: Joanna Courtney
Publisher: Goldmann Verlag
ISBN: 3641197341
Size: 53.65 MB
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Kiew 1031: Prinzessin Elisabeth sehnt sich nach Abenteuern – statt sich der Stickerei zu widmen, galoppiert sie lieber mit ihren Brüdern über die Felder. Und als der stattliche und kriegerische Wikingerprinz von Norwegen, Harald Hardrada, den Hof ihres Vaters besucht, ist es Liebe auf den ersten Blick. Harald entführt sie über die Weiten des Meeres in den hohen Norden und in ein aufregendes Leben. Doch ein noch viel größeres Abenteuer steht dem Paar bevor, als Haralds Flotte die englische Küste ansteuert, um die Insel zu erobern. Aber er ist nicht der Einzige, der seinen Anspruch auf den Thron geltend machen will ...

The Golden Dice

Author: Elisabeth Storrs
Publisher: Lake Union Publishing
ISBN: 9781477828564
Size: 78.18 MB
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During a bitter siege between Rome and the Etruscan city of Veii, three women follow different paths to survive. Caecilia, Roman born but Etruscan wed, forsakes Rome to return to her husband, Vel Mastarna, exposing herself to the enmity of his people while knowing the Romans will give her a traitor's death if Veii falls. Semni, a reckless Etruscan servant in the House of Mastarna, embroils herself in schemes that threaten Caecilia's son and Semni's own chance for love. Pinna, a destitute Roman prostitute, uses coercion to gain the attention of Rome's greatest general at the risk of betraying Caecilia's cousin. Each woman struggles to protect herself and those whom she loves in the dark cycle of war. What must they do to challenge Fate? And will they ever live in peace again? The Golden Dice is the sequel to The Wedding Shroud. The third book in the A Tale of Ancient Rome series is Call to Juno.

Clean

Author: Juno Dawson
Publisher: Carlsen
ISBN: 3646922559
Size: 36.55 MB
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Lexi ist reich, cool, ein It-Girl – und heroinsüchtig. Nach einer Überdosis landet sie in der Clarity-Klinik. Ihr Entzug ist hart, die Therapie schier unerträglich, vor allem die Treffen mit den „Mitinsassen“: Aufputschmittel-Junkie Saif, Trans-Mädchen Kendall, Guy mit der Zwangsneurose, Bulimikerin Ruby, Ex-Kinderstar Brady. Doch ausgerechnet diese fünf werden zu echten Freunden. Und Brady vielleicht mehr. Lexi öffnet sich vorsichtig, beginnt ihr zerstörerisches Leben zu hinterfragen. Aber ist ein anderer Weg überhaupt möglich? --- Ein Buch, das unter die Haut geht: scharfsinnig, scharfzüngig und schmerzlich realistisch! ---

Uxl Encyclopedia Of World Mythology Set 5 Volumes Cengage Learning 2009

Author: Cengage Learning
Publisher: Bukupedia
ISBN: 1414430302
Size: 75.10 MB
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Types of Entries Found in This Book Character entries generally focus on a single mythical character, such as a hero. In some cases, character entries deal with groups of similar or related beings—for example, Trolls or Valkyries. Deities (gods) are found in their own unique type of entry. Deity entries contain information about a god or goddess. An example would be Zeus (pronounced ZOOS), the leader of the ancient The UXL Encyclopedia of World Mythology examines the major characters, stories, and themes of mythologies from cultures around the globe, from African to Zoroastrian. Arranged alphabetically in an A– Z format, each entry provides the reader with an overview of the topic as well as contextual analysis to explain the topic's importance to the culture from which it came. In addition, each entry explains the topic's influence on modern life, and prompts the reader with a discussion question or reading/writing suggestion to inspire further analysis. There are five different types of entries: Character, Deity, Myth, Theme, and Culture. The entry types are designated by icons that are shown in a legend that appears on each page starting a new letter grouping so that you can easily tell which type of entry you are reading. Greek gods. Deities are very similar to other mythical characters, except that they often appear in many different myths; each Deity entry provides a summary of the most important myths related to that deity. Myth entries focus on a specific story as opposed to a certain character. One example is the entry on the Holy Grail, which tells the legend of the vessel’s origins as well as the many people who sought to xix locate it. In some cases, the myth is primarily concerned with a single character; the entry on the Golden Fleece, for example, features Jason as the main character. Like the Holy Grail entry, however, this entry focuses on the legends surrounding the object in question rather than the character involved. Theme entries examine how one single theme, idea, or motif is addressed in the mythologies of different cultures. An example would be the Reincarnation entry that examines different cultural depictions of this eternal cycle of death and rebirth. Culture entries contain a survey of the myths and beliefs of a particular culture. Each entry also provides historical and cultural context for understanding how the culture helped to shape, or was shaped by, the beliefs of other cultures. Types of Rubrics Found in This Book Each entry type is organized in specific rubrics to allow for ease of comparison across entries. The rubrics that appear in these entries are: Character/Myth/Theme Overview; Core Deities and Characters; Major Myths; [Subject] in Context; Key Themes and Symbols; [Subject] in Art, Literature, and Everyday Life; and Read, Write, Think, Discuss. In addition, the character, deity, and myth entries all have key facts sections in the margins that provide basic information about the entry, including the country or culture of origin, a pronunciation guide where necessary, alternate names for the character (when applicable), written or other sources in which the subject appears, and information on the character’s family (when applicable). Character Overview offers detailed information about the character’s place within the mythology of its given culture. This may include information about the character’s personality, summaries of notable feats, and relationships with other mythological characters. Myth Overview includes a summary of the myth being discussed. Theme Overview provides a brief description of the theme being discussed, as well as a rundown of the major points common when examining that theme in different mythologies. Core Deities and Characters includes brief descriptions of the main deities and other characters that figure prominently in the given culture’s mythology. This is not a comprehensive list of all the gods or characters mentioned in a particular culture. READER’S GUIDE xx UXL Encyclopedia of World Mythology Major Myths features a brief summary of all the most important or best-known myths related to the subject of the entry. For example, the entry on Odin (pronounced OH-din), chief god of Norse mythology, includes the tale describing how he gave up one of his eyes in order to be able to see the future. [Subject] in Context provides additional cultural and historical information that helps you understand the subject by seeing through the eyes of the people who made it part of their culture. The entry on the weaver Arachne (pronounced uh-RAK-nee), for instance, includes information on the importance of weaving as a domestic duty in ancient Greece. Key Themes and Symbols outlines the most important themes in the tales related to the subject. This section also includes explanations of symbols associated with the subject of the entry, or which appear in myths related to the subject. For example, this section may explain the meaning of certain objects a god is usually shown carrying. [Subject] in Art, Literature, and Everyday Life includes references to the subject in well-known works of art, literature, film, and other media. This section may also mention other ways in which the subject appears in popular culture. For example, the fact that a leprechaun (pronounced LEP-ruh-kawn) appears as the mascot for Lucky Charms cereal is mentioned in this section of the Leprechauns entry. Read, Write, Think, Discuss uses the material in the entry as a springboard for further discussion and learning. This section may include suggestions for further reading that are related to the subject of the entry, discussion questions regarding topics touched upon in the entry, writing prompts that explore related issues and themes, or research prompts that encourage you to delve deeper into the topics presented. Most of the entries end with cross-references that point you to related entries in the encyclopedia. In addition, words that appear in bold within the entry are also related entries, making it easy to find additional information that will enhance your understanding of the topic. Other Sections in This Book This encyclopedia also contains other sections that you may find useful when studying world mythology. One of these is a “Timeline of World Mythology,” which provides important dates from many cultures that xxi READER’S GUIDE UXL Encyclopedia of World Mythology are important to the development of their respective mythologies. A glossary in the front matter supplements the definitions that are included within the entries. Teachers will find the section on “Research and Activity Ideas” helpful in coming up with classroom activities related to the topic of mythology to engage students further in the subject. A section titled “Where to Learn More” provides you with other sources to learn more about the topic of mythology, organized by culture. You will also encounter sidebars in many of the entries; these sections offer interesting information that is related to, but not essential to, your understanding of the subject of the entry. Comments and Suggestions We welcome your comments on the UXL Encyclopedia of World Mythology and suggestions for other topics to consider. Please write to Editors, UXL Encyclopedia of World Mythology, Gale, 27500 Drake Rd., Farmington Hills, Michigan, 48331-3535. READER’S GUIDE xxii UXL Encyclopedia of World Mythology Introduction On the surface, myths are stories of gods, heroes, and monsters that can include fanciful tales about the creation and destruction of worlds, or awe-inspiring adventures of brave explorers in exotic or supernatural places. However, myths are not just random imaginings; they are cultivated and shaped by the cultures in which they arise. For this reason, a myth can function as a mirror for the culture that created it, reflecting the values, geographic location, natural resources, technological state, and social organization of the people who believe in it. Values The values of a culture are often revealed through that culture’s myths and legends. For example, a myth common in Micronesian culture tells of a porpoise girl who married a human and had children; after living many years as a human, she decided to return to the sea. Before she left, she warned her children against eating porpoise, since they might unknowingly eat some of their own family members by doing so. Myths such as these are often used to provide colorful reasons for taboos, or rules against certain behaviors. In this case, the myth explains a taboo among the Micronesian peoples against hunting and eating porpoises. Geography Myths often reflect a culture’s geographic circumstances. For example, the people of the Norse culture live in a region that has harsh, icy winters. It is no coincidence that, according to their myths, the being whose death led to the creation of the world was a giant made of frost. By contrast, the people of ancient Egypt lived in an dry, sunny land; their xxiii most important gods, such as Ra, were closely associated with the sun. Geographic features are also often part of a culture’s myths, or used as inspiration for mythological tales. Spider Rock, a tall peak located at Canyon de Chelly National Monument in Arizona, is said by the Hopi people to be the home of the creation goddess Spider Woman. The Atlas mountains in northern Africa took their name from the myth that the Titan Atlas (pronounced AT-luhs) had once stood there holding up the heavens, but had been transformed to stone in order to make his task easier. Natural Resources Myths can also reflect the natural resources available to a culture, or the resources most prized by a certain group. In Mesoamerican and American Indian myths, maize (commonly referred to as corn) often appears as a food offered directly from gods or goddesses, or grown from the body of a deity. This reflects not only the importance of maize in the diets of early North and Central American cultures, but also the ready availability of maize, which does not appear as a native plant anywhere else in the world. Similarly, the olive tree, which is native to the coastal areas along the Mediterranean Sea, is one of the most important trees in ancient Greek myth. The city of Athens, it is said, was named for the goddess Athena (pronounced uh-THEE-nuh) after she gave its citizens the very first domesticated olive tree. Sometimes, myths can reflect the importance of natural resources to an outside culture. For example, the Muisca people of what is now Colombia engaged in a ceremony in which their king covered himself in gold dust and took a raft out to the middle of a local lake; there he threw gold trinkets into the water as offerings to the gods. Gold was not commonly available, and was prized for its ceremonial significance; however, when Spanish explorers arrived in the New World and heard of this practice, they interpreted this to mean that gold must be commonplace in the area. This led to the myth of El Dorado, an entire city made of gold that many Spanish explorers believed to exist and spent decades trying to locate. Technology A culture’s state of technological development can also be reflected in its myths. The earliest ancient Greek myths of Uranus (pronounced INTRODUCTION xxiv UXL Encyclopedia of World Mythology YOOR-uh-nuhs) state that his son Cronus (pronounced KROH-nuhs) attacked him with a sickle made of obsidian. Obsidian is a stone that can be chipped to create a sharp edge, and was used by cultures older than the ancient Greeks, who relied on metals such as bronze and steel for their weapons. This might suggest that the myth arose from an earlier age; at the very least, it reflects the idea that, from the perspective of the Greeks, the myth took place in the distant past. Social Order Myths can also offer a snapshot of a culture’s social organization. The Old Testament tale of the Tower of Babel offers an explanation for the many tribes found in the ancient Near East: they had once been united, and sought to build a tower that would reach all the way to heaven. In order to stop this act of self-importance, God caused the people to speak in different languages. Unable to understand each other, they abandoned the ambitious project and scattered into groups across the region. Besides offering social order, myths can reinforce cultural views on the roles different types of individuals should assume in a society. The myth of Arachne (pronounced uh-RAK-nee) illustrates a fact known from other historical sources: weaving and fabric-making was the domestic duty of wives and daughters, and it was a skill highly prized in the homes of ancient Greece. Tales of characters such as Danaë (pronounced DAN-uh-ee), who was imprisoned in a tower by her father in order to prevent her from having a child, indicate the relative powerlessness of many women in ancient Greek society. Different Cultures, Different Perspectives To see how cultures reflect their own unique characteristics through myth, one can examine how a single theme—such as fertility—is treated in a variety of different cultures. Fertility is the ability to produce life, growth, or offspring, and is therefore common in most, if not all, mythologies. For many cultures, fertility is a key element in the creation of the world. The egg, one of the most common symbols of fertility, appears in Chinese mythology as the first object to form from the disorder that previously existed in place of the world. In many cultures, including ancient Greece, the main gods are born from a single mother; xxv INTRODUCTION UXL Encyclopedia of World Mythology in the case of the Greeks, the mother is Gaia (pronounced GAY-uh), also known as Earth. For cultures that relied upon agriculture, fertility was an important element of the changing seasons and the growth of crops. In these cases, fertility was seen as a gift from nature that could be revoked by cruel weather or the actions of the gods. Such is the case in the ancient Greek myth of Persephone (pronounced per-SEF-uh-nee); when the goddess is taken to the underworld by Hades (pronounced HAY-deez), her mother—the fertility goddess Demeter (pronounced di-MEE-ter)— became sad, which caused all vegetation to wither and die. For the ancient Egyptians, fertility represented not just crop growth and human birth, but also rebirth into the afterlife through death. This explains why Hathor (pronounced HATH-or), the mother goddess of fertility who supported all life, was also the maintainer of the dead. It was believed that Hathor provided food for the dead to help them make the long journey to the realm of the afterlife. For early Semitic cultures, the notion of fertility was not always positive. In the story of Lilith, the little-known first wife of Adam (the first man), the independent-minded woman left her husband and went to live by the Red Sea, where she gave birth to many demons each day. The myth seems to suggest that fertility is a power that can be used for good or evil, and that the key to using this power positively is for wives to dutifully respect the wishes of their husbands. This same theme is found in the earlier Babylonian myth of Tiamat (pronounced TYAH-maht), who gave birth to not only the gods but also to an army of monsters that fought to defend her from her son, the hero Marduk (pronounced MAHR-dook). These are just a few of the many ways in which different cultures can take a single idea and interpret it through their own tales. Rest assured that the myths discussed in this book are wondrous legends that capture the imagination of the reader. They are also mirrors in which we can see not only ourselves, but the reflections of cultures old and new, far and near—allowing us to celebrate their unique differences, and at the same time recognize those common elements that make these enchanting stories universally beloved and appreciated by readers and students around the world. INTRODUCTION xxvi UXL Encyclopedia of World Mythology Timeline of World Mythology c. 3400 BCE Early Sumerian writing is first developed.

Die Hure Des Kaisers

Author: Kate Quinn
Publisher: Ullstein Buchverlage
ISBN: 3960480962
Size: 50.53 MB
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Rom, 82 n. Chr.: Die junge Sklavin Thea muss ihre Herrin zu den Gladiatorenkämpfen begleiten, die sie verabscheut. Doch diesmal zieht ein neuer Kämpfer alle Zuschauer in seinen Bann: Arius, genannt »der Barbar«. Thea fühlt sofort eine innere Verbundenheit, und tatsächlich sind sie und Arius Seelenverwandte – beide haben so viel Mord und Grausamkeit erlebt, dass sie den Tod verachten. Doch sie können ihre Liebe nicht leben, denn der Kaiser persönlich begehrt Thea für sich.

Die Kastellanin

Author: Iny Lorentz
Publisher: Knaur eBook
ISBN: 3426554690
Size: 11.80 MB
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Marie und ihr Ehemann Michel Adler leben glücklich und voller Liebe zusammen. Ihr Glück scheint vollkommen, als sie ein Kind erwartet. Doch dann muss Michel in den Kampf gegen die aufständischen Hussiten ziehen. Zwar wird Michel aufgrund seiner Tapferkeit und seines Mutes zum Ritter geschlagen wird – doch verschwindet er zu Maries Entsetzen nach einem grausamen Gemetzel spurlos. Nachdem er für tot erklärt wird, ist Marie ganz auf sich allein gestellt. Täglich wird sie neu gedemütigt und ihr bleibt letztlich nur ein Ausweg: Sie muss von ihrer Burg fliehen. Als Marketenderin schließt sie sich einem neuen Heerzug an. Da Marie an den Tod ihres Mannes nicht glaubt und im Herzen spürt, dass er noch lebt, möchte sie auf diese Weise ihren Mann suchen. Wird ihr Mut belohnt werden? Die Wanderhuren-Saga im Überblick: 1. Die Wanderhure 2. Die Kastellanin 3. Das Vermächtnis der Wanderhure 4. Die Tochter der Wanderhure 5. Töchter der Sünde 6. Die List der Wanderhure