Download caviar and ashes a warsaw generations life and death in marxism 1918 1968 in pdf or read caviar and ashes a warsaw generations life and death in marxism 1918 1968 in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get caviar and ashes a warsaw generations life and death in marxism 1918 1968 in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Caviar And Ashes

Author: Marci Shore
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300128622
Size: 22.74 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 2317
Download and Read
The stories behind the acquisition of ancient antiquities are often as important as those that tell of their creation. This fascinating book provides a comprehensive account of the history and development of classical archaeology, explaining how and why artefacts have moved from foreign soil to collections around the world. As archaeologist Stephen Dyson shows, Greek and Roman archaeological study was closely intertwined with ideas about class and social structure; the rise of nationalism and later political ideologies such as fascism; and the physical and cultural development of most of the important art museums in Europe and the United States, whose prestige depended on their creation of collections of classical art. Accompanied by a discussion of the history of each of the major national traditions and their significant figures, this lively book shows how classical archaeology has influenced attitudes about areas as wide-ranging as tourism, nationalism, the role of the museum, and historicism in nineteenth- and twentieth-century art.

Caviar And Ashes

Author: Marci Shore
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300110920
Size: 19.30 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 6832
Download and Read
This history of the generation of Polish literati born at the end of the 19th century tells of the young avant-gardists of the early 1920's who become the radical Marxists of the late 1920's. It traces the journey through futurist manifestos, Nazi genocide and Stalinist terror from literary cafes to prison cells.

The Taste Of Ashes

Author: Marci Shore
Publisher: Crown Pub
ISBN: 0307888819
Size: 60.52 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 6117
Download and Read
An inventive, wholly original look at the complex psyche of Eastern Europe in the wake of the revolutions of 1989 and the opening of the communist archives. Yale historian and prize-winning author Shore draws upon intimate understanding to illuminate the afterlife of totalitarianism.

The Ukrainian Night

Author: Marci Shore
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300218680
Size: 62.16 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 5847
Download and Read
A vivid and intimate account of the Ukrainian Revolution, the rare moment when the political became the existential What is worth dying for? While the world watched the uprising on the Maidan as an episode in geopolitics, those in Ukraine during the extraordinary winter of 2013-14 lived the revolution as an existential transformation: the blurring of night and day, the loss of a sense of time, the sudden disappearance of fear, the imperative to make choices. In this lyrical and intimate book, Marci Shore evokes the human face of the Ukrainian Revolution. Grounded in the true stories of activists and soldiers, parents and children, Shore's book blends a narrative of suspenseful choices with a historian's reflections on what revolution is and what it means. She gently sets her portraits of individual revolutionaries against the past as they understand it--and the future as they hope to make it. In so doing, she provides a lesson about human solidarity in a world, our world, where the boundary between reality and fiction is ever more effaced.

Prague Territories

Author: Scott Spector
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520929777
Size: 32.93 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 6638
Download and Read
Scott Spector’s adventurous cultural history maps for the first time the "territories" carved out by German-Jewish intellectuals living in Prague at the dawn of the twentieth century. Spector explores the social, cultural, and ideological contexts in which Franz Kafka and his contemporaries flourished, revealing previously unseen relationships between politics and culture. His incisive readings of a broad array of German writers feature the work of Kafka and the so-called "Prague circle" and encompass journalism, political theory, Zionism, and translation as well as literary program and practice. With the collapse of German-liberal cultural and political power in the late-nineteenth-century Habsburg Empire, Prague’s bourgeois Jews found themselves squeezed between a growing Czech national movement on the one hand and a racial rather than cultural conception of Germanness on the other. Displaced from the central social and cultural position they had come to occupy, the members of the "postliberal" Kafka generation were dazzlingly productive and original, far out of proportion to their numbers. Seeking a relationship between ideological crisis and cultural innovation, Spector observes the emergence of new forms of territoriality. He identifies three fundamental areas of cultural inventiveness related to this Prague circle’s political and cultural dilemma. One was Expressionism, a revolt against all limits and boundaries, the second was a spiritual form of Zionism incorporating a novel approach to Jewish identity that seems to have been at odds with the pragmatic establishment of a Jewish state, and the third was a sort of cultural no-man’s-land in which translation and mediation took the place of "territory." Spector’s investigation of these areas shows that the intensely particular, idiosyncratic experience of German-speaking Jews in Prague allows access to much broader and more general conditions of modernity. Combining theoretical sophistication with a refreshingly original and readable style, Prague Territories illuminates some early signs of a contemporary crisis from which we have not yet emerged.

The Generation

Author: Jaff Schatz
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520071360
Size: 75.34 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5778
Download and Read
Revolutionaries and rebels, shoemakers and tailors, refugees, soldiers, intellectuals, and apparatchiks. They were the extraordinary generation of Polish-Jewish Communists--"the last true Communists," as some of them say today. With pathos and deeply informed insight, Jaff Schatz relates the life story of the Jews who joined the Polish Communist Party in the late 1920s and early 1930s, only to become its victims thirty years later. Schatz draws on archival research and interviews with forty-three surviving members of this generation that gave up everything but their dream of a new world order. He frames the personal drama of their rise and fall with important questions about the interaction of biography and history, showing how the lives of The Generation uniquely concentrate the recent history of East-Central Europe. Revolutionaries and rebels, shoemakers and tailors, refugees, soldiers, intellectuals, and apparatchiks. They were the extraordinary generation of Polish-Jewish Communists--"the last true Communists," as some of them say today. With pathos and deeply informed insight, Jaff Schatz relates the life story of the Jews who joined the Polish Communist Party in the late 1920s and early 1930s, only to become its victims thirty years later. Schatz draws on archival research and interviews with forty-three surviving members of this generation that gave up everything but their dream of a new world order. He frames the personal drama of their rise and fall with important questions about the interaction of biography and history, showing how the lives of The Generation uniquely concentrate the recent history of East-Central Europe.

The House At Ujazdowskie 16

Author: Karen Auerbach
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253009154
Size: 49.70 MB
Format: PDF
View: 615
Download and Read
In a turn-of-the-century, once elegant building at 16 Ujazdowskie Avenue in the center of Warsaw, 10 Jewish families began reconstructing their lives after the Holocaust. While most surviving Polish Jews were making their homes in new countries, these families rebuilt on the rubble of the Polish capital and created new communities as they sought to distance themselves from the memory of a painful past. Based on interviews with family members, intensive research in archives, and the families' personal papers and correspondence, Karen Auerbach presents an engrossing story of loss and rebirth, political faith and disillusionment, and the persistence of Jewishness.

The Black Seasons

Author: Michal Glowinski
Publisher: Northwestern University Press
ISBN: 0810119595
Size: 47.61 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 3247
Download and Read
A mosaic of memories from a childhood in the Warsaw Ghetto and a life in hiding on the other side of the wall When six-year-old Michal Glowinski first heard the adults around him speak of the ghetto, he understood only that the word was connected with moving-and conjured up a fantastical image of a many-storied carriage pulled through the streets by some umpteen horses. He was soon to learn that the ghetto was something else entirely. A half-century later, Glowinski, now an eminent Polish literary scholar, leads us haltingly into Nazi-occupied Poland. Scrupulously attentive to the distance between a child's experience and an adult's reflection, Glowinski revisits the images and episodes of his childhood: the emaciated violinist playing a Mendelssohn concerto on the ghetto streets; his game of chess with a Polish blackmailer threatening to deliver him to the Gestapo; and his eventual rescue by Catholic nuns in an impoverished, distant convent. In language at once spare and eloquent, Glowinski explores the horror of those years, the fragility of existence, and the fragmented nature of memory itself.

Monte Rosa

Author: Jaroslaw Martyniuk
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1543439063
Size: 64.75 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 103
Download and Read
A sweeping panorama of the author’s life from the outbreak of WWII to the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. The narrative begins in Ukraine and ends in Paris where he coordinated the work of fty undercover interviewers engaged in unorthodox research with Soviet visitors in Western Europe, a chapter of Cold War history never revealed in such remarkable detail. The story includes the author’s narrow escape from Communism, an account of his extended family’s ordeal in the Soviet Gulag, life in post-war Bavaria, thirty years in Chicago and culminates with twelve years in France where he worked for the International Energy Agency and Radio Liberty.

The Jews In Poland And Russia 1881 1914

Author: Antony Polonsky
Publisher: Littman Library of Jewish
ISBN: 9781904113836
Size: 43.31 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 3468
Download and Read
Moshe Rosman presents a cogent and critical argument for the considerations that must be brought to bear on the writing of Jewish history today. By highlighting in one book the issues raised by postmodernism, How Jewish is Jewish History? considers the questions that Jewish historians must confront if their work is to be taken seriously by mainstream intellectuals, or indeed by educated Jews interested in understanding their own cultural and historical past. The major cultural, ideological, and social changes that have occurred in Europe in the past century have generated widespread reassessment of European history in terms of its presuppositions, its methodologies, its directions, its emphases, and its scope. This timely volume looks at the Jewish past in the spirit of this reassessment, It points to a new framework for the study of Jewish history and helps to contextualize it within the mainstream of historical scholarship. The family and the community, which were in a very real sense the core institutions of east European Jewish society, underwent very rapid change in the nineteenth century. The essays in this volume look at the past through the prism of the lives of ordinary people, with results that are sometimes surprising, and always stimulating. The topics they treat are varied, but the concern to explain what lay behind the visible reality is common to all of them. In Three-Volume History, Antony Polonsky provides a comprehensive survey---socio-political, economic, and religious---of the Jewish communities of eastern Europe from 1350 to the present. Until the Second World War, this was the heartland of the Jewish world: nearly three and a half million Jews lived in Poland alone, while nearly three million more lived in the Soviet Union. Although the majority of the Jews of Europe and the United States, and many of the Jews of Israel, originate from these lands, their history there is not well known. Rather, it is the subject of mythologizing and stereotypes that fail both to bring out the specific features of the Jewish civilization which emerged there and to illustrate what was lost. Jewish life, though often poor materially, was marked by a high degree of spiritual and ideological intensity and creativity. Antony Polonsky recreates this lost world---brutally cut down by the Holocaust and less brutally but still seriously damaged by the Soviet attempt to destroy Jewish culture. Wherever possible, the unfolding of history is illustrated by contemporary Jewish writings to show how Jews felt and reacted to the complex and difficult situations in which they found themselves. This second volume covers the period from 1881 to 1914. It considers the deterioration in the position of the Jews during that time and the new political and cultural movements that developed as a consequence: Zionism, socialism, autonomism, the emergence of modern Hebrew and Yiddish literature, Jewish urbanization, and the rise of popular Jewish culture. Galicia, Prussian Poland, the Kingdom of Poland, and the tsarist empire are all treated individually, as are the main towns of these areas. Volume I covers the period 1350-1881; Volume 3 covers 1914-2005.