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Chicago S New Negroes

Author: Davarian L. Baldwin
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807887608
Size: 10.84 MB
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As early-twentieth-century Chicago swelled with an influx of at least 250,000 new black urban migrants, the city became a center of consumer capitalism, flourishing with professional sports, beauty shops, film production companies, recording studios, and other black cultural and communal institutions. Davarian Baldwin argues that this mass consumer marketplace generated a vibrant intellectual life and planted seeds of political dissent against the dehumanizing effects of white capitalism. Pushing the traditional boundaries of the Harlem Renaissance to new frontiers, Baldwin identifies a fresh model of urban culture rich with politics, ingenuity, and entrepreneurship. Baldwin explores an abundant archive of cultural formations where an array of white observers, black cultural producers, critics, activists, reformers, and black migrant consumers converged in what he terms a "marketplace intellectual life." Here the thoughts and lives of Madam C. J. Walker, Oscar Micheaux, Andrew "Rube" Foster, Elder Lucy Smith, Jack Johnson, and Thomas Dorsey emerge as individual expressions of a much wider spectrum of black political and intellectual possibilities. By placing consumer-based amusements alongside the more formal arenas of church and academe, Baldwin suggests important new directions for both the historical study and the constructive future of ideas and politics in American life.

Chicago S New Negroes

Author: Davarian L. Baldwin
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807830992
Size: 38.23 MB
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Chicago's New Negroes: Modernity, the Great Migration, and Black Urban Life

Chicago S New Negroes

Author: Davarian L. Baldwin
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN:
Size: 78.91 MB
Format: PDF
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Chicago's New Negroes: Modernity, the Great Migration, and Black Urban Life

Selling The Race

Author: Adam Green
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226306410
Size: 76.53 MB
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"In his study, Green tells the story of how this unified consciousness was shaped. With this portrayal of black life - complemented by a dozen works of the Chicago photographer Wayne F. Miller - Green ultimately presents African Americans as agents, rather than casualties, of modernity, reenvisioning urban existence in a way that will resonate with anyone interested in race, culture, or the life of cities."--Jacket.

Writers Of The Black Chicago Renaissance

Author: Steven C. Tracy
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252093429
Size: 72.34 MB
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Writers of the Black Chicago Renaissance comprehensively explores the contours and content of the Black Chicago Renaissance, a creative movement that emerged from the crucible of rigid segregation in Chicago's "Black Belt" from the 1930s through the 1960s. Heavily influenced by the Harlem Renaissance and the Chicago Renaissance of white writers, its participants were invested in political activism and social change as much as literature, art, and aesthetics. The revolutionary writing of this era produced some of the first great accolades for African American literature and set up much of the important writing that came to fruition in the Black Arts Movement. The volume covers a vast collection of subjects, including many important writers such as Richard Wright, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Lorraine Hansberry as well as cultural products such as black newspapers, music, and theater. The book includes individual entries by experts on each subject; a discography and filmography that highlight important writers, musicians, films, and cultural presentations; and an introduction that relates the Harlem Renaissance, the white Chicago Renaissance, the black Chicago Renaissance, and the Black Arts Movement. Contributors are Robert Butler, Robert H. Cataliotti, Maryemma Graham, James C. Hall, James L. Hill, Michael Hill, Lovalerie King, Lawrence Jackson, Angelene Jamison-Hall, Keith Leonard, Lisbeth Lipari, Bill V. Mullen, Patrick Naick, William R. Nash, Charlene Regester, Kimberly Ruffin, Elizabeth Schultz, Joyce Hope Scott, James Smethurst, Kimberly M. Stanley, Kathryn Waddell Takara, Steven C. Tracy, Zoe Trodd, Alan Wald, Jamal Eric Watson, Donyel Hobbs Williams, Stephen Caldwell Wright, and Richard Yarborough.

Popular Fronts

Author: Bill Mullen
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252067488
Size: 13.59 MB
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"In a stunning revision of radical politics during the Popular Front period, Bill Mullen redefines the cultural renaissance of the 1930s and early 1940s as the fruit of an extraordinary rapprochement between African-American and white members of the U.S. Left struggling to create a new ""American Negro"" culture.A dynamic reappraisal of a critical moment in American cultural history,Popular Frontsincludes a major reassessment of the politics of Richard Wright's critical reputation, a provocative reading of class struggle in Gwendolyn Brooks'sA Street in Bronzeville, and in-depth examinations of the institutions that comprised Chicago's black popular front: theChicago Defender, the period's leading black newspaper;Negro Story, the first magazine devoted to publishing short stories by and about black Americans; and the WPA-sponsored South Side Community Art Center."

Jim Crow Nostalgia

Author: Michelle R. Boyd
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 0816646775
Size: 67.45 MB
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An incisive examination of how black leaders reinvented the history of Chicago's Bronzeville neighborhood in ways that sanitized the brutal elements of life under Jim Crow develops a new way to understand the political significance of race today. Simultaneous.

Migrating To The Movies

Author: Jacqueline Najuma Stewart
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520936409
Size: 16.48 MB
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The rise of cinema as the predominant American entertainment around the turn of the last century coincided with the migration of hundreds of thousands of African Americans from the South to the urban "land of hope" in the North. This richly illustrated book, discussing many early films and illuminating black urban life in this period, is the first detailed look at the numerous early relationships between African Americans and cinema. It investigates African American migrations onto the screen, into the audience, and behind the camera, showing that African American urban populations and cinema shaped each other in powerful ways. Focusing on Black film culture in Chicago during the silent era, Migrating to the Movies begins with the earliest cinematic representations of African Americans and concludes with the silent films of Oscar Micheaux and other early "race films" made for Black audiences, discussing some of the extraordinary ways in which African Americans staked their claim in cinema's development as an art and a cultural institution.

Hearing The Hurt

Author: Eric King Watts
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 081731766X
Size: 66.40 MB
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Examines how the Harlem Renaissance brought black culture to the fore in American language during the early 20th century, exploring especially how the meaning of the word "black" changed due to culture shifts.