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Cold New World

Author: William Finnegan
Publisher: Modern Library
ISBN: 0307766144
Size: 53.39 MB
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New Yorker writer William Finnegan spent time with families in four communities across America and became an intimate observer of the lives he reveals in these beautifully rendered portraits: a fifteen-year-old drug dealer in blighted New Haven, Connecticut; a sleepy Texas town transformed by crack; Mexican American teenagers in Washington State, unable to relate to their immigrant parents and trying to find an identity in gangs; jobless young white supremacists in a downwardly mobile L.A. suburb. Important, powerful, and compassionate, Cold New World gives us an unforgettable look into a present that presages our future. A New York Times Notable Book of the Year A Los Angeles Times Best Nonfiction of 1998 selection One of the Voice Literary Supplement's Twenty-five Favorite Books of 1998 From the Trade Paperback edition.

A Complicated War

Author: William Finnegan
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520082663
Size: 52.16 MB
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Powerful, instructive, and full of humanity, this book challenges the current understanding of the war that has turned Mozambique--a naturally rich country--into the world's poorest nation. Before going to Mozambique, William Finnegan saw the war, like so many foreign observers, through a South African lens, viewing the conflict as apartheid's "forward defense." This lens was shattered by what he witnessed and what he heard from Mozambicans, especially those who had lived with the bandidos armado, the "armed bandits" otherwise known as the Renamo rebels. The shifting, wrenching, ground-level stories that people told combine to form an account of the war more local and nuanced, more complex, more African--than anything that has been politically convenient to describe. A Complicated War combines frontline reporting, personal narrative, political analysis, and comparative scholarship to present a picture of a Mozambique harrowed by profound local conflicts--ethnic, religious, political and personal. Finnegan writes that South Africa's domination and destabilization are basic elements of Mozambique's plight, but he offers a subtle description and analysis that will allow us to see the post-apartheid region from a new, more realistic, if less comfortable, point of view.

Dateline Soweto

Author: William Finnegan
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520915695
Size: 58.74 MB
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Dateline Soweto documents the working lives of black South African reporters caught between the mistrust of militant blacks, police harrassment, and white editors who—fearing government disapproval—may not print the stories these reporters risk their lives to get. William Finnegan revisited several of these reporters during the May 1994 election and describes their post-apartheid working experience in a new preface and epilogue.

Sugar In The Blood

Author: Andrea Stuart
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307474542
Size: 60.44 MB
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Presents a history of the interdependence of sugar, slavery, and colonial settlement in the New World through the story of the author's ancestors, exploring the myriad connections between sugar cultivation and her family's identity, genealogy, and financial stability.

A Clever Base Ballist

Author: Bryan Di Salvatore
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801865626
Size: 77.53 MB
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"This is a grand book--vehement, scholarly, funny, exuberant, and artfully evocative of the man and his time. Bryan Di Salvatore is one of the finest writers of nonfiction in America."--Ian Frazier One of baseball's earliest stars, John Montgomery Ward (1860-1925) was a formidable talent. Today, he stands alone as the only player with more than 100 wins as a pitcher and 2,000 hits as a batter. Ward played at a time when baseball was evolving from a pastime into a business, and his most important legacy may have been his role "in establishing modern organized baseball" (as his plaque in the Baseball Hall of Fame reads). He organized the sport's first union, the Brotherhood of Professional Ball Players, and in 1890 led a revolt against National League owners by creating a third major league--The Players' League--presaging a century of bitter conflict between players and owners. In this engaging biography, Bryan Di Salvatore captures the brash energy of this larger-than-life sports figure and offers a keenly observed narrative about baseball's often troubled coming of age.

Full Body Burden

Author: Kristen Iversen
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 0307955648
Size: 22.43 MB
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Full Body Burden is a haunting work of narrative nonfiction about a young woman, Kristen Iversen, growing up in a small Colorado town close to Rocky Flats, a secret nuclear weapons plant once designated "the most contaminated site in America." It's the story of a childhood and adolescence in the shadow of the Cold War, in a landscape at once startlingly beautiful and--unknown to those who lived there--tainted with invisible yet deadly particles of plutonium. It's also a book about the destructive power of secrets--both family and government. Her father's hidden liquor bottles, the strange cancers in children in the neighborhood, the truth about what was made at Rocky Flats (cleaning supplies, her mother guessed)--best not to inquire too deeply into any of it. But as Iversen grew older, she began to ask questions. She learned about the infamous 1969 Mother's Day fire, in which a few scraps of plutonium spontaneously ignited and--despite the desperate efforts of firefighters--came perilously close to a "criticality," the deadly blue flash that signals a nuclear chain reaction. Intense heat and radiation almost melted the roof, which nearly resulted in an explosion that would have had devastating consequences for the entire Denver metro area. Yet the only mention of the fire was on page 28 of the Rocky Mountain News, underneath a photo of the Pet of the Week. In her early thirties, Iversen even worked at Rocky Flats for a time, typing up memos in which accidents were always called "incidents." And as this memoir unfolds, it reveals itself as a brilliant work of investigative journalism--a detailed and shocking account of the government's sustained attempt to conceal the effects of the toxic and radioactive waste released by Rocky Flats, and of local residents' vain attempts to seek justice in court. Here, too, are vivid portraits of former Rocky Flats workers--from the healthy, who regard their work at the plant with pride and patriotism, to the ill or dying, who battle for compensation for cancers they got on the job. Based on extensive interviews, FBI and EPA documents, and class-action testimony, this taut, beautifully written book promises to have a very long half-life.

Barbarian Days

Author: William Finnegan
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143109391
Size: 66.54 MB
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Surfing only looks like a sport. To initiates, it is something else entirely: a beautiful addiction, a demanding course of study, a morally dangerous pastime, a way of life. Raised in California and Hawaii, Finnegan started surfing as a child. He has chased waves all over the world, wandering for years through the South Pacific, Australia, Asia, Africa. A bookish boy, and then an excessively adventurous young man, he went on to become a writer and war reporter. Barbarian Days takes us deep into unfamiliar worlds, some of them right under our noses -- off the coasts of New York and San Francisco. It immerses the reader in the edgy camaraderie of close male friendships annealed in challenging waves.

Manufacturing Depression

Author: Gary Greenberg
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781416570080
Size: 77.74 MB
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Am I depressed or just unhappy? In the last two decades, antidepressants have become staples of our medicine cabinets—doctors now write 120 million prescriptions annually, at a cost of more than 10 billion dollars. At the same time, depression rates have skyrocketed; twenty percent of Americans are now expected to suffer from it during their lives. Doctors, and drug companies, claim that this convergence is a public health triumph: the recognition and treatment of an under-diagnosed illness. Gary Greenberg, a practicing therapist and longtime depressive, raises a more disturbing possibility: that the disease has been manufactured to suit (and sell) the cure. Greenberg draws on sources ranging from the Bible to current medical journals to show how the idea that unhappiness is an illness has been packaged and sold by brilliant scientists and shrewd marketing experts—and why it has been so successful. Part memoir, part intellectual history, part exposé—including a vivid chronicle of his participation in a clinical antidepressant trial—Manufacturing Depression is an incisive look at an epidemic that has changed the way we have come to think of ourselves.

My War Gone By I Miss It So

Author: Anthony Loyd
Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
ISBN: 0802193145
Size: 67.73 MB
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A “beautiful and disturbing” account of the Bosnian conflict by a war correspondent grappling with heroin addiction and a family legacy of military heroism (The Wall Street Journal). In an earlier era, Anthony Loyd imagines, he would have fought fascism in Spain. Instead, the twenty-six-year-old scion of a distinguished military family left England in 1993 to experience the conflict in Bosnia as a reporter. While he found his time serving in the British army during the Gulf War disappointingly uneventful, Loyd would spend the next three years documenting one of the most callous and chaotic clashes ever fought on European soil. Plunged into the midst of the struggle among the Serbs, Croatians, and Bosnian Muslims, Loyd saw humanity at its extremes, witnessing tragedy daily in city streets and mountain villages. Shocking and violent, yet lyrical and ultimately redemptive, Loyd’s memoir is an uncompromising feat of reportage, and one man’s on-the-ground look at Yugoslavia’s brutal dissolution. But Loyd’s personal war didn’t end after he emerged from the trenches. Addicted to the adrenaline of armed combat, he returned home to continue his own longstanding battle against drug addiction. “Battlefield reportage does not get more up close, gruesome, and personal. . . . The fear and confusion of battle are so vivid that in places, they rise like acrid smoke from the page.” —The New York Times “Loyd’s strongest writing is in his descriptions of carnage—of the sound and smell of shellfire; of the sexual release of blasting away with an automatic machine gun. . . . This is pure war reporting, free from the usual journalistic constraints that often give a false significance to suffering.” —Salon.com “First-rate war correspondence . . . [in] the great tradition of Hemingway, Caputo, and Michael Herr.” —The Boston Globe

Growing Up In Coal Country

Author: Susan Campbell Bartoletti
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780395979143
Size: 19.34 MB
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Describes what life was like, especially for children, in coal mines and mining towns in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.