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Constitutional Law For A Changing America

Author: Lee Epstein
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 1506380328
Size: 63.38 MB
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Capturing the authors’ excitement for constitutional law, this updated Tenth Edition of Constitutional Law for a Changing America shows you how judicial decisions are influenced by political factors—from lawyers and interest groups, to the shifting sentiments of public opinion, to the ideological and behavioral inclinations of the justices. Authors Lee Epstein and Thomas G. Walker show how these dynamics shape the development of constitutional doctrine. Known for fastidious revising and streamlining, the authors incorporate the latest scholarship in the fields of both political science and legal studies and offer solid analysis of both classic and contemporary landmark cases, including key opinions handed down through the 2017 session. Filled with additional supporting material—photographs of the litigants, sidebars comparing the United States with other nations, and “Aftermath” boxes that tell the stories of the parties' lives after the Supreme Court has acted—the text helps you develop a thorough understanding of the way the U.S. Constitution protects civil rights and liberties.

American Judicial Process

Author: Pamela C. Corley
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113628656X
Size: 14.13 MB
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This text is a general introduction to American judicial process. The authors cover the major institutions, actors, and processes that comprise the U.S. legal system, viewed from a political science perspective. Grounding their presentation in empirical social science terms, the authors identify popular myths about the structure and processes of American law and courts and then contrast those myths with what really takes place. Three unique elements of this "myth versus reality" framework are incorporated into each of the topical chapters: 1) "Myth versus Reality" boxes that lay out the topics each chapter covers, using the myths about each topic contrasted with the corresponding realities. 2) "Pop Culture" boxes that provide students with popular examples from film, television, and music that tie-in to chapter topics and engage student interest. 3) "How Do We Know?" boxes that discuss the methods of social scientific inquiry and debunk common myths about the judiciary and legal system. Unlike other textbooks, American Judicial Process emphasizes how pop culture portrays—and often distorts—the judicial process and how social science research is brought to bear to provide an accurate picture of law and courts. In addition, a rich companion website will include PowerPoint lectures, suggested topics for papers and projects, a test bank of objective questions for use by instructors, and downloadable artwork from the book. Students will have access to annotated web links and videos, flash cards of key terms, and a glossary.

The Oxford Companion To The Supreme Court Of The United States

Author: Kermit L. Hall
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0195176618
Size: 73.37 MB
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The second edition of this authoritative guide on the impact of the Supreme Court's decisions on American society includes updated entries on key cases over the past thirteen years, as well as a fully revised treatment of areas of constitutional law.

The Choices Justices Make

Author: Lee Epstein
Publisher: Cq Pr
ISBN: 9781568022260
Size: 50.38 MB
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The Choices Justices Make argues convincingly that Supreme Court justices are policy-makers who strategically select courses of action by weighing not only their own preferences, but also the actions they expect from their colleagues on the Court, Congress, and the president.Enriched with unique data, stories, and internal documents culled from four justices' private papers, this book makes a strong case for the factors that hold sway over justices as they decide which cases to accept, how to vote in conference, and how to word their written opinions.

Outspoken

Author: Nan Levinson
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520249976
Size: 32.63 MB
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A collection of twenty stories from the front lines of free speech captures the essence of the debate over free expression in a post-9/11 world, from a Puerto Rican journalist who is willing to risk prison to protect her sources to a fireman fighting for the right to read Playboy at work. (Current Affairs)

Reason In Law

Author: Lief Carter
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317344685
Size: 72.32 MB
Format: PDF
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Arguing that good legal reasoning remains the best device by which we can ensure that judicial impartiality, the rule of law, and social trust and peace are preserved, Thomas F. Burke and Lief H. Carter present an accessible and lively text that analyzes the politics of the judicial process. Looking at the larger social and institutional contexts that affect the rule of law - including religious beliefs and media coverage of the courts - Reason in Law uses cases ripped from the headlines to illustrate its theory in real-world practice.

Advice And Consent

Author: Lee Epstein
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195345834
Size: 58.39 MB
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From Louis Brandeis to Robert Bork to Clarence Thomas, the nomination of federal judges has generated intense political conflict. With the coming retirement of one or more Supreme Court Justices--and threats to filibuster lower court judges--the selection process is likely to be, once again, the center of red-hot partisan debate. In Advice and Consent, two leading legal scholars, Lee Epstein and Jeffrey A. Segal, offer a brief, illuminating Baedeker to this highly important procedure, discussing everything from constitutional background, to crucial differences in the nomination of judges and justices, to the role of the Judiciary Committee in vetting nominees. Epstein and Segal shed light on the role played by the media, by the American Bar Association, and by special interest groups (whose efforts helped defeat Judge Bork). Though it is often assumed that political clashes over nominees are a new phenomenon, the authors argue that the appointment of justices and judges has always been a highly contentious process--one largely driven by ideological and partisan concerns. The reader discovers how presidents and the senate have tried to remake the bench, ranging from FDR's controversial "court packing" scheme to the Senate's creation in 1978 of 35 new appellate and 117 district court judgeships, allowing the Democrats to shape the judiciary for years. The authors conclude with possible "reforms," from the so-called nuclear option, whereby a majority of the Senate could vote to prohibit filibusters, to the even more dramatic suggestion that Congress eliminate a judge's life tenure either by term limits or compulsory retirement. With key appointments looming on the horizon, Advice and Consent provides everything concerned citizens need to know to understand the partisan rows that surround the judicial nominating process.