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Creating Gender Fair Schools Classrooms And Colleges

Author: Lynn Raphael Reed
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1848605633
Size: 32.41 MB
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For many teachers, gender issues related to role models, image and expectations have an effect upon the behaviour and achievement of both boys and girls, often to their disadvantage. This innovative and practical resource, for teachers of students aged 14-19provides: o a programme to promote gender equality and inclusivity in schools and colleges o a rationale for the programme based on social justice o a practical set of classroom activities to implement the programme The book adopts an 'action inquiry' methodology - engaging students and staff in the processes of investigating what is currently happening, and planning, implementing and reviewing improvements. This contributes to the development of the school or college as a self-evaluating organisation which listens to the voice of the young person. The programme also supports teachers and other school staff in developing as reflective practitioners, and children and young people in developing as reflective learners. 'A real strength of the resource is the inclusion of practical activities that have been carefully designed for pupils. These are excellent and lend themselves for use in a variety of ways. This is a thoroughly recommended resource.' - SENCO Update

Stalinism And Nazism

Author: Ian Kershaw
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521565219
Size: 73.31 MB
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Several distinguished historians present the first comprehensive comparison of Nazism and Stalinism.

Violence And Childhood In The Inner City

Author: Joan McCord
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521587204
Size: 55.59 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The contributors to this book believe that something can be done to make life in American cities safer, to make growing up in the urban ghettos less risky, and to reduce the violence that so often permeates urban childhoods. They consider why there is so much violence, why some people become violent and others do not, and why violence is more prevalent in some areas. Both biological and psychological characteristics of individuals are considered. The authors also discuss how the urban environment, especially the street culture, affects childhood development. They review a variety of intervention strategies, considering when it would be appropriate to use them and towards whom they should be targeted. Drawing upon ethnographic commentary, laboratory experiments, historical reviews, and program descriptions, this book presents a variety of opinions on the causes of urban violence and the changes necessary to reduce it.

Racism In A Racial Democracy

Author: France Winddance Twine
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813523651
Size: 28.24 MB
Format: PDF
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In Racism in a Racial Democracy, France Winddance Twine asks why Brazilians, particularly Afro-Brazilians, continue to have faith in Brazil's "racial democracy" in the face of pervasive racism in all spheres of Brazilian life. Through a detailed ethnography, Twine provides a cultural analysis of the everyday discursive and material practices that sustain and naturalize white supremacy. This is the first ethnographic study of racism in southeastern Brazil to place the practices of upwardly mobile Afro-Brazilians at the center of analysis. Based on extensive field research and more than fifty life histories with Afro- and Euro-Brazilians, this book analyzes how Brazilians conceptualize and respond to racial disparities. Twine illuminates the obstacles Brazilian activists face when attempting to generate grassroots support for an antiracist movement among the majority of working class Brazilians. Anyone interested in racism and antiracism in Latin America will find this book compelling.

The Social Psychology Of Protest

Author: Bert Klandermans
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 9780631188797
Size: 52.81 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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This is an overview of the development of social movements based on current research on movement mobilization and participation. It is an ideal guide to the field for upper-level students studying the development of movement participation in social psychology, sociology or politics. The discussion is illuminated by extensive international examples ranging from women's movements, to right wing extremist groups, to social movements in South Africa. The Social Psychology of Protest addresses the classic problems that have been studied in the field: construction and reconstruction of collective beliefs, the transformation of discontent into collective action, and sustained participation and disengagement. Although the emphasis is on the individual's role, the book also discusses how the dynamics of movement participation are influenced by movement characteristics, multiorganizational fields and political opportunities.

International Handbook Of Urban Education

Author: William T. Pink
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1402051999
Size: 50.75 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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The universality of the problematics with urban education, together with the importance of understanding the context of improvement interventions, brings into sharp focus the importance of an undertaking like the International Handbook of Urban Education. An important focus of this book is the interrogation of both the social and political factors that lead to different problem posing and subsequent solutions within each region.

Real Knockouts

Author: Martha McCaughey
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814796443
Size: 77.35 MB
Format: PDF
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An examination of women's self-defense culture and its relationship to feminism. I was once a frightened feminist. So begins Martha McCaughey's odyssey into the dynamic world of women's self- defense, a culture which transforms women involved with it and which has equally profound implications for feminist theory and activism. Unprecedented numbers of American women are learning how to knock out, maim, even kill men who assault them. Sales of mace and pepper spray have skyrocketed. Some 14 million women own handguns. From behind the scenes at gun ranges, martial arts dojos, fitness centers offering Cardio Combat, and in padded attacker courses like Model Mugging, Real Knockouts demonstrates how self-defense trains women out of the femininity that makes them easy targets for men's abuse. And yet much feminist thought, like the broader American culture, seems deeply ambivalent about women's embrace of violence, even in self-defense. Investigating the connection between feminist theory and women physically fighting back, McCaughey found self-defense culture to embody, literally, a new brand of feminism.

Live And Die Like A Man

Author: Farha Ghannam
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804787913
Size: 62.16 MB
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Watching the revolution of January 2011, the world saw Egyptians, men and women, come together to fight for freedom and social justice. These events gave renewed urgency to the fraught topic of gender in the Middle East. The role of women in public life, the meaning of manhood, and the future of gender inequalities are hotly debated by religious figures, government officials, activists, scholars, and ordinary citizens throughout Egypt. Live and Die Like a Man presents a unique twist on traditional understandings of gender and gender roles, shifting the attention to men and exploring how they are collectively "produced" as gendered subjects. It traces how masculinity is continuously maintained and reaffirmed by both men and women under changing socio-economic and political conditions. Over a period of nearly twenty years, Farha Ghannam lived and conducted research in al-Zawiya, a low-income neighborhood not far from Tahrir Square in northern Cairo. Detailing her daily encounters and ongoing interviews, she develops life stories that reveal the everyday practices and struggles of the neighborhood over the years. We meet Hiba and her husband as they celebrate the birth of their first son and begin to teach him how to become a man; Samer, a forty-year-old man trying to find a suitable wife; Abu Hosni, who struggled with different illnesses; and other local men and women who share their reactions to the uprising and the changing situation in Egypt. Against this backdrop of individual experiences, Ghannam develops the concept of masculine trajectories to account for the various paths men can take to embody social norms. In showing how men work to realize a "male ideal," she counters the prevalent dehumanizing stereotypes of Middle Eastern men all too frequently reproduced in media reports, and opens new spaces for rethinking patriarchal structures and their constraining effects on both men and women.