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Critical Race Theory And Copyright In American Dance

Author: Caroline Joan S. Picart
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137321970
Size: 12.53 MB
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The effort to win federal protection for dance in the United States was a racialized and gendered contest. Picart traces the evolution of choreographic works from being federally non-copyrightable to becoming a category potentially copyrightable under the 1976 Copyright Act, specifically examining Loíe Fuller, George Balanchine, and Martha Graham.

Choreographing Copyright

Author: Anthea Kraut
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199360375
Size: 47.98 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"Choreographing Copyright provides a historical and cultural analysis of U.S.-based dance-makers' investment in intellectual property rights. Although federal copyright law in the U.S. did not recognize choreography as a protectable class prior to the 1976 Copyright Act, efforts to win copyright protection for dance began eight decades earlier. In a series of case studies stretching from the late nineteenth century to the early twenty-first, the book reconstructs those efforts and teases out their raced and gendered politics. Rather than chart a narrative of progress, the book shows how dancers working in a range of genres have embraced intellectual property rights as a means to both consolidate and contest racial and gendered power. A number of the artists featured in Choreographing Copyright are well-known white figures in the history of American dance, including modern dancers Loie Fuller, Hanya Holm, and Martha Graham, and ballet artists Agnes de Mille and George Balanchine. But the book also uncovers a host of marginalized figures - from the South Asian dancer Mohammed Ismail, to the African American pantomimist Johnny Hudgins, to the African American blues singer Alberta Hunter, to the white burlesque dancer Faith Dane - who were equally interested in positioning themselves as subjects rather than objects of property, as possessive individuals rather than exchangeable commodities. Choreographic copyright, the book argues, has been a site for the reinforcement of gendered white privilege as well as for challenges to it. Drawing on critical race and feminist theories and on cultural studies of copyright, Choreographing Copyright offers fresh insight into such issues as: the raced and gendered hierarchies that govern the theatrical marketplace, white women's historically contingent relationship to property rights, legacies of ownership of black bodies and appropriation of non-white labor, and the tension between dance's ephemerality and its reproducibility"--

Law In And As Culture

Author: Caroline Joan "Kay" S. Picart
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1611477220
Size: 31.54 MB
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There are two oppositional narratives in relation to telling the story of indigenous peoples and minorities in relation to globalization and intellectual property rights. The first, the narrative of Optimism, is a story of the triumphant opening of brave new worlds of commercial integration and cultural inclusion. The second, the narrative of Fear, is a story of the endangerment, mourning, and loss of a traditional culture. While the story of Optimism deploys a rhetoric of commercial mobilization and “innovation,” the story of Fear emphasizes the rhetoric of preserving something “pure” and “traditional” that is “dying.” Both narratives have compelling rhetorical force, and actually need each other, in order to move their opposing audiences into action. However, as Picart shows, the realities behind these rhetorically framed political parables are more complex than a simple binary. Hence, the book steers a careful path between hope rather than unbounded Optimism, and caution, rather than Fear, in exploring how law functions in and as culture as it contours the landscape of intellectual property rights, as experienced by indigenous peoples and minorities. Picart uses, among a variety of tools derived from law, critical and cultural studies, anthropology and communication, case studies to illustrate this approach. She tracks the fascinating stories of the controversies surrounding the ownership of a Taiwanese folk song; the struggle over control of the Mapuche’s traditional land in Chile against the backdrop of Chile’s drive towards modernization; the collaboration between the Kani tribe in India and a multinational corporation to patent an anti-fatigue chemical agent; the drive for respect and recognition by Australian Aboriginal artists for their visual expressions of folklore; and the challenges American women of color such as Josephine Baker and Katherine Dunham faced in relation to the evolving issues of choreography, improvisation and copyright. The book also analyzes the cultural conflicts that result from these encounters between indigenous populations or minorities and majority groups, reflects upon the ways in which these conflicts were negotiated or resolved, both nationally and internationally, and carefully explores proposals to mediate such conflicts.

The Palgrave Handbook Of Race And The Arts In Education

Author: Amelia M. Kraehe
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 9783319652559
Size: 28.48 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The Palgrave Handbook of Race and the Arts in Education is the first edited volume to examine how race operates in and through the arts in education. Until now, no single source has brought together such an expansive and interdisciplinary collection in exploration of the ways in which music, visual art, theater, dance, and popular culture intertwine with racist ideologies and race-making. Drawing on Critical Race Theory, contributing authors bring an international perspective to questions of racism and anti-racist interventions in the arts in education. The book’s introduction provides a guiding framework for understanding the arts as white property in schools, museums, and informal education spaces. Each section is organized thematically around historical, discursive, empirical, and personal dimensions of the arts in education. This handbook is essential reading for students, educators, artists, and researchers across the fields of visual and performing arts education, educational foundations, multicultural education, and curriculum and instruction.

Pym

Author: Mat Johnson
Publisher: Random House Digital, Inc.
ISBN: 0812981766
Size: 69.66 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Een werkloze ex-docent Afrikaans-Amerikaanse literatuur ontdekt een 19e eeuws manuscript, gaat op basis daarvan op expeditie en doet een onwaarschijnlijke ontdekking.

Contemporary Chinese America

Author: Min Zhou
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 1592138594
Size: 23.13 MB
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A sociologist of international migration examines the Chinese American experience.

Red Pedagogy

Author: Sandy Grande
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 161048990X
Size: 63.96 MB
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This ground-breaking text explores the intersection between dominant modes of critical educational theory and the socio-political landscape of American Indian education. Grande asserts that, with few exceptions, the matters of Indigenous people and Indian education have been either largely ignored or indiscriminately absorbed within critical theories of education.

Raising Race Questions

Author: Ali Michael
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807773417
Size: 73.12 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Conversations about race can be confusing, contentious, and frightening, particularly for White people. Even just asking questions about race can be scary because we are afraid of what our questions might reveal about our ignorance or bias. Raising Race Questions invites teachers to use inquiry as a way to develop sustained engagement with challenging racial questions and to do so in community so that they learn how common their questions actually are. It lays out both a process for getting to questions that lead to growth and change, as well as a vision for where engagement with race questions might lead. Race questions are not meant to lead us into a quagmire of guilt, discomfort, or isolation. Sustained race inquiry is meant to lead to anti-racist classrooms, positive racial identities, and a restoration of the wholeness of spirit and community that racism undermines. Book Features: Case studies of expert and experienced White teachers who still have questions about race. Approaches for talking about race in the K–12 classroom. Strategies for facilitating race conversations among adults. A variety of different resources useful in the teacher inquiry groups described in the book. Research with teachers, not on teachers, including written responses from each teacher whose classroom is featured in the book. “In Raising Race Questions Ali Michael is an excavator, determined to dig into every unexplored crevice of White teachers’ experiences with race in order to unearth the complex realities of racism and schooling, and a model of reflective inquiry, willing to lay herself and her assumptions bare in service to the reader's consciousness and her own. This book grew my consciousness in multiple ways, and that is the greatest gift an author can give me.” —Paul Gorski, founder, EdChange, associate professor, George Mason University “Ali Michael has a gift for getting people talking. This must-read book captures her ‘magic’ and shares useful strategies for teachers and schools working to develop their racial proficiency. As a White teacher engaged in this work, I've watched these tools help educators support one another as they make mistakes, reflect, and grow together.” —Lynn Eckerman, Teacher, Independence Charter School, Philadelphia, PA

Where The Waters Divide

Author: Michael Mascarenhas, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739168282
Size: 11.86 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Where the Waters Divide is one of the few book length studies that analyze contemporary forms of racism and white privilege in Canadian society. The book argues that neoliberalism represents a key moment in time for the racial formation in Canada, one that functions not through overt forms of state sanctioned racism, as in the past, but via the morality of the marketplace and the primacy of individual solutions to modern environmental and social problems.