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Cross Cultural Perspectives On Policy And Practice

Author: Jennifer Lavia
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135202176
Size: 15.76 MB
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This book provides a space in which struggles for indigenous knowledge within communities are articulated, valued, heard, and responded to. The volume takes change as its focus, yet acknowledges that the origins and significance of change are frequently found to be unsettling. Contributors explore different understandings of change that forge sustainable, inclusive and just communities and examine issues related to citizenship, resistance, peacemaking, critical literacies, and second chance opportunities. The authors seek to promote advocacy of change that recognises the importance of an informed engagement with cross-cultural issues in order to foreground those missing perspectives that are often marginalised, silenced, ignored or denied. All contributors are concerned with how the process of change can bridge the gap between social justice and exclusion and develop critical understandings of the implications of changing policy and practice for those within and working with the educational organisations and communities.

International Case Studies Of Dyslexia

Author: Peggy L. Anderson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136735917
Size: 70.16 MB
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Dyslexia is a disability that exists in all countries that have high expectations for literacy. The inability to read in spite of normal intellectual potential represents one of the most puzzling educational challenges for literate societies, regardless of the culture or language. This book examines medical, psychological, educational, and sociological data from comprehensive case studies of preteen dyslexic children, in order to profile the disability as it occurs in seventeen different nations. Interviews with the children and their parents reveal how children with dyslexia are identified and treated around the world, and provide a look at various perceptions of dyslexia and its challenges. Researchers and practitioners in education, psychology, and health-related professions will find this case book to be an excellent reference. Parents of children with dyslexia will find the advocacy recommendations helpful.

International Handbook Of Interpretation In Educational Research

Author: Paul Smeyers
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9401792828
Size: 38.31 MB
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This handbook focuses on the often neglected dimension of interpretation in educational research. It argues that all educational research is in some sense ‘interpretive’, and that understanding this issue belies some usual dualisms of thought and practice, such as the sharp dichotomy between ‘qualitative’ and ‘quantitative’ research. Interpretation extends from the very framing of the research task, through the sources which constitute the data, the process of their recording, representation and analysis, to the way in which the research is finally or provisionally presented. The thesis of the handbook is that interpretation cuts across the fields (both philosophically, organizationally and methodologically). By covering a comprehensive range of research approaches and methodologies, the handbook gives (early career) researchers what they need to know in order to decide what particular methods can offer for various educational research contexts/fields. An extensive overview includes concrete examples of different kinds of research (not limited for example to ‘teaching’ and ‘learning’ examples as present in the Anglo-Saxon tradition, but including as well what in the German Continental tradition is labelled ‘pädagogisch’, examples from child rearing and other contexts of non-formal education) with full description and explanation of why these were chosen in particular circumstances and reflection on the wisdom or otherwise of the choice – combined in each case with consideration of the role of interpretation in the process. The handbook includes examples of a large number of methods traditionally classified as qualitative, interpretive and quantitative used across the area of the study of education. Examples are drawn from across the globe, thus exemplifying the different ‘opportunities and constraints’ that educational research has to confront in different societies.

Disrupting Adult And Community Education

Author: Robert C. Mizzi
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438460937
Size: 53.60 MB
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Reconceptualizes local, national, and transnational adult education practices in light of neoliberalism and globalization. This groundbreaking book critiques the boundaries of where adult education takes place through a candid examination of teaching, learning, and working practices in the social periphery. Lives in this context are diverse and made through complex practices that take place in the shadows of formal systems: on streetscapes and farms, in vehicles and homes, and through underground networks. Educators may be family members, friends, or colleagues, and the curriculum may be based on needs, interests, histories, and cultural practices. The case studies presented here analyze adult education in the lives of sex workers, LGBTQ activists, undocumented migrants, disabled workers, homeless youth, immigrants, inmates, and others. Focusing on learning at the social margins, this book challenges readers to reconceptualize local, national, and transnational adult education practices in light of neoliberalism and globalization.

Disability And Social Theory

Author: D. Goodley
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137023007
Size: 12.32 MB
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This comprehensive, interdisciplinary collection, examines disability from a theoretical perspective, challenging views of disability that dominate mainstream thinking. Throughout, social theories of disability intersect with ideas associated with sex/gender, race/ethnicity, class and nation.

Teaching And Learning In Diverse And Inclusive Classrooms

Author: Gill Richards
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136894918
Size: 30.89 MB
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How can you develop effective teaching strategies so that all the children in your classroom are included in meaningful and enriching learning experiences? What can you do to help young people from diverse backgrounds achieve their full potential? Addressing the wide variety of issues of diversity and inclusion routinely encountered in today’s classrooms, this comprehensive text provides both a theoretical background and practical strategies. Chapters from leading figures on inclusive education present and analyse the latest debates, research studies and current initiatives, including considerations for teaching and learning and concluding with key questions for reflection and additional resources. Moving beyond simple theory about diversity, to what this means for real teachers’ practice, the contributions focus on issues relating to values and professional practice for teachers, emphasising inclusive approaches and the importance of understanding the perspectives of learners. Topics discussed include: understanding inclusive education ethnic and cultural diversity challenging behaviour bullying gender identity and sexuality gifted and talented learners traveller children special educational needs collaborative working in schools the perspective of parents. Designed to stimulate and strengthen teachers’ professional understanding, the book also reflects on legislative duties, personal values and the importance of listening to the voice of individuals who experience disadvantage in educational settings. Teaching and Learning in Diverse and Inclusive Classrooms is a key resource for teachers, supporting their learning throughout their initial training and early professional development. It will also be of interest to more experienced teachers interested in diversity and inclusion, particularly those mentoring NQTs through their induction and Masters level studies.

Language Policies And Dis Citizenship

Author: Prof. Vaidehi Ramanathan
Publisher: Multilingual Matters
ISBN: 1783090219
Size: 60.36 MB
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This volume explores the concept of 'citizenship', and argues that it should be understood both as a process of becoming and the ability to participate fully, rather than as a status that can be inherited, acquired, or achieved. From a courtroom in Bulawayo to a nursery in Birmingham, the authors use local contexts to foreground how the vulnerable, particularly those from minority language backgrounds, continue to be excluded, whilst offering a powerful demonstration of the potential for change offered by individual agency, resistance and struggle. In addressing questions such as 'under what local conditions does "dis-citizenship" happen?'; 'what role do language policies and pedagogic practices play?' and 'what kinds of margins and borders keep humans from fully participating'? The chapters in this volume shift the debate away from visas and passports to more uncertain and contested spaces of interpretation.

Decolonizing Social Work

Author: John Coates
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317153731
Size: 50.45 MB
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Riding on the success of Indigenous Social Work Around the World, this book provides case studies to further scholarship on decolonization, a major analytical and activist paradigm among many of the world’s Indigenous Peoples, including educators, tribal leaders, activists, scholars, politicians, and citizens at the grassroots level. Decolonization seeks to weaken the effects of colonialism and create opportunities to promote traditional practices in contemporary settings. Establishing language and cultural programs; honouring land claims, teaching Indigenous history, science, and ways of knowing; self-esteem programs, celebrating ceremonies, restoring traditional parenting approaches, tribal rites of passage, traditional foods, and helping and healing using tribal approaches are central to decolonization. These insights are brought to the arena of international social work still dominated by western-based approaches. Decolonization draws attention to the effects of globalization and the universalization of education, methods of practice, and international ’development’ that fail to embrace and recognize local knowledges and methods. In this volume, Indigenous and non-Indigenous social work scholars examine local cultures, beliefs, values, and practices as central to decolonization. Supported by a growing interest in spirituality and ecological awareness in international social work, they interrogate trends, issues, and debates in Indigenous social work theory, practice methods, and education models including a section on Indigenous research approaches. The diversity of perspectives, decolonizing methodologies, and the shared struggle to provide effective professional social work interventions is reflected in the international nature of the subject matter and in the mix of contributors who write from their contexts in different countries and cultures, including Australia, Canada, Cuba, Japan, Jordan, Mexico, New Zealand, South Africa, and the USA.