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Crossing The Next Meridian

Author: Charles F. Wilkinson
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 159726914X
Size: 25.13 MB
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In Crossing the Next Meridian, Charles F. Wilkinson, an expert on federal public lands, Native American issues, and the West's arcane water laws explains some of the core problems facing the American West now and in the years to come. He examines the outmoded ideas that pervade land use and resource allocation and argues that significant reform of Western law is needed to combat desertification and environmental decline, and to heal splintered communities. Interweaving legal history with examples of present-day consequences of the laws, both intended and unintended, Wilkinson traces the origins and development of the laws and regulations that govern mining, ranching, forestry, and water use. He relates stories of Westerners who face these issues on a day-to-day basis, and discusses what can and should be done to bring government policies in line with the reality of twentieth-century American life.

The Environmental Case

Author: Judith A. Layzer
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1452239894
Size: 67.80 MB
Format: PDF
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Through its 15 carefully constructed cases, the book gives readers a first-hand look at some of the most interesting landmark and illuminating new controversies in U.S. environmental policy making. In her new section "New Issues, New Politics," Layzer adds two brand new cases: The Deepwater Horizon Disaster: The High Cost of Offshore Oil; and Fracking Wars: Local and State Responses to Unconventional Shale Gas Development. Lazyer provides maps, tables, figures, questions to consider, recommended readings, and useful websites to help students think critically about environmental policy and to facilitate further research.

As Precious As Blood

Author: Steven C. Schulte
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
ISBN: 1607325004
Size: 44.58 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The diversion of water from Colorado’s Western Slope to meet the needs of the rest of the state has been a contentious issue throughout Colorado’s history. The source of Colorado’s water is in the snow that accumulates west of the Continental Divide, but the ever-growing population on the Front Range continues to require more municipal water. In As Precious as Blood, Steven C. Schulte examines the water wars between these two regions and how the western part of the state fits into Colorado’s overall water story, expanding the account of water politics he began in Wayne Aspinall and the Shaping of the American West. Slow to build its necessary water infrastructure and suffering from a small population, little political power, and distance from sources of capital, the Western Slope of Colorado has struggled to maintain its water supply in the face of challenges from Colorado’s Eastern Slope and even different states. Schulte explains in detail the reasons, rationalizations, and resources involved in the multimillion-dollar dams and reclamation projects that divert much-needed water to the Front Range and elsewhere. He draws from archives, newspapers, and oral histories to show the interrelationships among twentieth-century Colorado water law, legislators from across the state, and powerful members of congress from the Western Slope, who have influenced water policy throughout the American West. As Precious as Blood provides context for one of the most contentious legal, political, and economic periods in the state’s history. Schulte puts a human face on Colorado’s water wars by exploring their social and political dimensions alongside the technical and scientific perspectives.

Bird On Fire

Author: Andrew Ross
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199912297
Size: 49.96 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Phoenix, Arizona is one of America's fastest growing metropolitan regions. It is also its least sustainable one, sprawling over a thousand square miles, with a population of four and a half million, minimal rainfall, scorching heat, and an insatiable appetite for unrestrained growth and unrestricted property rights. In Bird on Fire, eminent social and cultural analyst Andrew Ross focuses on the prospects for sustainability in Phoenix--a city in the bull's eye of global warming--and also the obstacles that stand in the way. Most authors writing on sustainable cities look at places that have excellent public transit systems and relatively high density, such as Portland, Seattle, or New York. But Ross contends that if we can't change the game in fast-growing, low-density cities like Phoenix, the whole movement has a major problem. Drawing on interviews with 200 influential residents--from state legislators, urban planners, developers, and green business advocates to civil rights champions, energy lobbyists, solar entrepreneurs, and community activists--Ross argues that if Phoenix is ever to become sustainable, it will occur more through political and social change than through technological fixes. Ross explains how Arizona's increasingly xenophobic immigration laws, science-denying legislature, and growth-at-all-costs business ethic have perpetuated social injustice and environmental degradation. But he also highlights the positive changes happening in Phoenix, in particular the Gila River Indian Community's successful struggle to win back its water rights, potentially shifting resources away from new housing developments to producing healthy local food for the people of the Phoenix Basin. Ross argues that this victory may serve as a new model for how green democracy can work, redressing the claims of those who have been aggrieved in a way that creates long-term benefits for all. Bird on Fire offers a compelling take on one of the pressing issues of our time--finding pathways to sustainability at a time when governments are dismally failing in their responsibility to address climate change.

Wilderburbs

Author: Lincoln Bramwell
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295805587
Size: 13.47 MB
Format: PDF
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Since the 1950s, the housing developments in the West that historian Lincoln Bramwell calls �wilderburbs� have offered residents both the pleasures of living in nature and the creature comforts of the suburbs. Remote from cities but still within commuting distance, nestled next to lakes and rivers or in forests and deserts, and often featuring spectacular views of public lands, wilderburbs celebrate the natural beauty of the American West and pose a vital threat to it. Wilderburbs tells the story of how roads and houses and water development have transformed the rural landscape in the West. Bramwell introduces readers to developers, homeowners, and government regulators, all of whom have faced unexpected environmental problems in designing and building wilderburb communities, including unpredictable water supplies, threats from wildfires, and encounters with wildlife. By looking at wilderburbs in the West, especially those in Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico, Bramwell uncovers the profound environmental consequences of Americans� desire to live in the wilderness.

Preserving Western History

Author: Andrew Gulliford
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826333100
Size: 20.85 MB
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The first collection of essays on public history in the American West.

The People Are Dancing Again

Author: Charles Wilkinson
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295802014
Size: 54.48 MB
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The history of the Siletz is in many ways the history of all Indian tribes in America: a story of heartache, perseverance, survival, and revival. It began in a resource-rich homeland thousands of years ago and today finds a vibrant, modern community with a deeply held commitment to tradition. The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians�twenty-seven tribes speaking at least ten languages�were brought together on the Oregon Coast through treaties with the federal government in 1853�55. For decades after, the Siletz people lost many traditional customs, saw their languages almost wiped out, and experienced poverty, killing diseases, and humiliation. Again and again, the federal government took great chunks of the magnificent, timber-rich tribal homeland, a reservation of 1.1 million acres reaching a full 100 miles north to south on the Oregon Coast. By 1956, the tribe had been �terminated� under the Western Oregon Indian Termination Act, selling off the remaining land, cutting off federal health and education benefits, and denying tribal status. Poverty worsened, and the sense of cultural loss deepened. The Siletz people refused to give in. In 1977, after years of work and appeals to Congress, they became the second tribe in the nation to have its federal status, its treaty rights, and its sovereignty restored. Hand-in-glove with this federal recognition of the tribe has come a recovery of some land--several hundred acres near Siletz and 9,000 acres of forest--and a profound cultural revival. This remarkable account, written by one of the nation�s most respected experts in tribal law and history, is rich in Indian voices and grounded in extensive research that includes oral tradition and personal interviews. It is a book that not only provides a deep and beautifully written account of the history of the Siletz, but reaches beyond region and tribe to tell a story that will inform the way all of us think about the past. Watch the book trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NEtAIGxp6pc

Who Controls Public Lands

Author: Christopher McGrory Klyza
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807862533
Size: 48.85 MB
Format: PDF
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In this historical and comparative study, Christopher McGrory Klyza explores why land-management policies in mining, forestry, and grazing have followed different paths and explains why public-lands policy in general has remained virtually static over time. According to Klyza, understanding the different philosophies that gave rise to each policy regime is crucial to reforming public-lands policy in the future. Klyza begins by delineating how prevailing policy philosophies over the course of the last century have shaped each of the three land-use patterns he discusses. In mining, the model was economic liberalism, which mandated privatization of public lands; in forestry, it was technocratic utilitarianism, which called for government ownership and management of land; and in grazing, it was interest-group liberalism, in which private interests determined government policy. Each of these philosophies held sway in the years during which policy for that particular resource was formed, says Klyza, and continues to animate it even today.

Water And Climate In The Western United States

Author: William M. Lewis
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN:
Size: 31.51 MB
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Although developed intensively as a resource for more than a century, the use and management of water in the Western United States are far from being settled matters. With papers from researchers and managers representing the multiple viewpoints of climate forecasting, water management, water law, and water allocation, Water and Climate in the Western United States demonstrates that new technologies and a new scientific understanding of the water cycle are developing. This new insight is emerging at a time when demands for water are expanding and changing as traditional policies and institutions are coming under severe criticism for their inadequacy. The degree to which vagaries of climate can be anticipated and countered--through better predictions, better supervision, and reformed legal and management systems for allocating water--are explored thoroughly by the contributors in the context of a long-term climate record and changes in water use. The papers in this volume highlight both the opportunity and necessity for change in human management of water, the West's most limited resource. Unique in its full, integrated coverage, Water and Climate in the Western United States will appeal to academics and policymakers interested in water supply and management questions as well as climate prediction.