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Dictionary Of Human Neuroanatomy

Author: Martin C. Hirsch
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 3642571786
Size: 14.95 MB
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This dictionary is an ideal reference for researchers and students, providing information on all structures related to neuroanatomy. Its standardized entries are sorted in alphabetical order to guarantee quick and easy access. The Dictionary of Human Neuroanatomy is based on the data presented in the InterBRAIN CD-ROM and lists approximately 1,000 neuroanatomical terms.

Using The Biological Literature

Author: Diane Schmidt
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 9780824741716
Size: 33.79 MB
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"Provides an in-depth review of current print and electronic tools for research in numerous disciplines of biology, including dictionaries and encyclopedias, method guides, handbooks, on-line directories, and periodicals. Directs readers to an associated Web page that maintains the URLs and annotations of all major Inernet resources discussed in this edition."

Dictionary Of Biological Psychology

Author: Philip Winn
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134778155
Size: 69.29 MB
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Biological Psychology is the study of psychological processes in terms of biological functions. A major obstacle to understanding dialogue in the field has always been its terminology which is drawn from a variety of non-psychological sources such as clinical medicine, psychiatry and neuroscience, as well as specialist areas of psychology such as ethology, learning theory and psychophysics. For the first time, a distinguished international team of contributors has now drawn these terms together and defined them both in terms of their physical properties and their behavioural significance. The Dictionary of Biological Psychology will prove an invaluable source of reference for undergraduates in psychology wrestling with the fundamentals of brain physiology, anatomy and chemistry, as well as researchers and practitioners in the neurosciences, psychiatry and the professions allied to medicine. It is an essential resource both for teaching and for independent study, reliable for fact-checking and a solid starting point for wider exploration.

Neuroanatomy And The Neurologic Exam

Author: Terence R. Anthoney
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 9780849386312
Size: 24.80 MB
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In this book! Neuroanatomy and the Neurologic Exam is an innovative, comprehensive thesaurus that surveys terminology from neuroanatomy and the neurologic examination, as well as related general terms from neurophysiology, neurohistology, neuroembryology, neuroradiology, and neuropathology. The author prepared the thesaurus by examining how terms were used in a large sample of recent, widely used general textbooks in basic neuroanatomy and clinical neurology. These textbooks were written by experts who received their primary professional training in 13 different countries, allowing the thesaurus to incorporate synonyms and conflicting definitions that occur as a result of variations in terminology used in other countries. The thesaurus contains:

Neuroanatomical Terminology

Author: Larry Swanson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190211466
Size: 57.18 MB
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Human brain imaging, connectomics, network analysis, and neuroinformatics are just some of the important current arenas in neuroscience addressed here. The book solves a fundamental problem by supplying the first global, historically documented, hierarchically organized human nervous system parts list. This defined vocabulary accurately and systematically describes every human nervous system structural feature that can be observed with current imaging methods, and provides an extendible framework for describing accurately the nervous system in all animals including invertebrates and vertebrates alike. Research for the book began in the late 1990s when the lack of a systematic vocabulary for neuroanatomy became a critical problem in developing databases and online knowledge management systems for the NIH Human Brain Project (1995-2005), which grew out of the Institute of Medicine's Committee on a National Neural Circuitry Database (1989). One outcome of this research was the publication with Mihail Bota in 2011 of a Foundational Model of Connectivity. It provides the conceptual framework for this book, which is divided into three main parts. The first consists of four chapters discussing the rationale behind the Lexicon of nervous system parts, historical trends in the evolution of neuroanatomical concepts and nomenclature, the development of hierarchical nomenclature tables, and practical notes on using the Lexicon. The second part is the Lexicon itself, with separate entries for 1,381 standard terms. Each standard term has a textual definition including the method used for identification, age, sex, and species to which it applies, and a citation to the first use of the term as so defined. Each entry also has, where appropriate, chronological lists of nonstandard terms (10,928 in all): translations, alternate spellings, earlier delineations before naming, earlier synonyms, later synonyms, and partly corresponding terms. The third part is a set of 10 hierarchical nomenclature tables of nervous system standard terms.

Human Language And Our Reptilian Brain

Author: Philip Lieberman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674040229
Size: 76.30 MB
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This book is an entry into the fierce current debate among psycholinguists, neuroscientists, and evolutionary theorists about the nature and origins of human language. A prominent neuroscientist here takes up the Darwinian case, using data seldom considered by psycholinguists and neurolinguists to argue that human language--though more sophisticated than all other forms of animal communication--is not a qualitatively different ability from all forms of animal communication, does not require a quantum evolutionary leap to explain it, and is not unified in a single "language instinct." Using clinical evidence from speech-impaired patients, functional neuroimaging, and evolutionary biology to make his case, Philip Lieberman contends that human language is not a single separate module but a functional neurological system made up of many separate abilities. Language remains as it began, Lieberman argues: a device for coping with the world. But in a blow to human narcissism, he makes the case that this most remarkable human ability is a by-product of our remote reptilian ancestors' abilities to dodge hazards, seize opportunities, and live to see another day.