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Divided By Faith

Author: Michael O. Emerson
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195147070
Size: 44.20 MB
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Based on a telephone survey of 2,000 people and 200 interviews, the authors study the grassroots of white evangelical America and learn that evangelicals themselves seem to hang on to the nation's racial divide and at this point in time real racial reconciliation remains unsolved by conservative Christians.

Divided By Faith

Author: Michael O. Emerson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199741199
Size: 27.39 MB
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Through a nationwide telephone survey of 2,000 people and an additional 200 face-to-face interviews, Michael O. Emerson and Christian Smith probed the grassroots of white evangelical America. They found that despite recent efforts by the movement's leaders to address the problem of racial discrimination, evangelicals themselves seem to be preserving America's racial chasm. In fact, most white evangelicals see no systematic discrimination against blacks. But the authors contend that it is not active racism that prevents evangelicals from recognizing ongoing problems in American society. Instead, it is the evangelical movement's emphasis on individualism, free will, and personal relationships that makes invisible the pervasive injustice that perpetuates racial inequality. Most racial problems, the subjects told the authors, can be solved by the repentance and conversion of the sinful individuals at fault. Combining a substantial body of evidence with sophisticated analysis and interpretation, the authors throw sharp light on the oldest American dilemma. In the end, they conclude that despite the best intentions of evangelical leaders and some positive trends, real racial reconciliation remains far over the horizon.

Divided By Faith

Author: Michael O. Emerson
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0195131401
Size: 22.15 MB
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In recent years, the leaders of the American evangelical movement have brought their characteristic passion to the problem of race, notably in the Promise Keepers movement and in reconciliation theology. But the authors of this provocative new study reveal that despite their good intentions, evangelicals may actually be preserving America's racial chasm. In Divided by Faith, Michael O. Emerson and Christian Smith probe the grassroots of white evangelical America, through a nationwide telephone survey of 2,000 people, along with 200 face-to-face interviews. The results of their research are surprising. Most white evangelicals, they learned, see no systematic discrimination against blacks; indeed, they deny the existence of any ongoing racial problem in the United States. Many of their subjects blamed the continuing talk of racial conflict on the media, unscrupulous black leaders, and the inability of African Americans to forget the past. What lies behind this perception? Evangelicals, Emerson and Smith write, are not so much actively racist as committed to a theological view of the world that makes it difficult for them to see systematic injustice. The evangelical emphasis on individualism, free will, and personal relationships makes invisible the pervasive injustice that perpetuates inequality between the races. Most racial problems, they told the authors, can be solved by the repentance and conversion of the sinful individuals at fault. Combining a substantial body of evidence with sophisticated analysis and interpretation, Emerson and Smith throw sharp light on the oldest American dilemma. Despite the best intentions of evangelical leaders and some positive trends, the authors conclude that real racial reconciliation remains far over the horizon.

Christians And The Color Line

Author: Philip Luke Sinitiere
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199329508
Size: 44.51 MB
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The essays in Christians and the Color Line complicate the research findings of Emerson and Smith's Divided by Faith (2000) and explore new areas of research that have opened in the years since its publication.

United By Faith

Author: Curtiss Paul DeYoung
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195177527
Size: 27.40 MB
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Presents an argument for multiracial Christian congregations in breaking down racial barriers in the United States.

Divided By Faith And Ethnicity

Author: Andrea Althoff
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
ISBN: 1614518408
Size: 75.85 MB
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In a unique approach, this book analyzes the spread of Pentecostal Christianity and the growth of indigenous revitalization movements. It explores the roles ethnicity and ethnic identities play in contemporary processes of religious pluralism. It is particularly relevant to those interested in the growth of the Protestant Pentecostal and neo-Pentecostal movements, the Catholic Charismatic Renewal, and the indigenous Maya movement in Guatemala.

The Great And Holy War

Author: Philip Jenkins
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062105108
Size: 43.28 MB
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The Great and Holy War offers the first look at how religion created and prolonged the First World War. At the one-hundredth anniversary of the outbreak of the war, historian Philip Jenkins reveals the powerful religious dimensions of this modern-day crusade, a period that marked a traumatic crisis for Western civilization, with effects that echoed throughout the rest of the twentieth century. The war was fought by the world's leading Christian nations, who presented the conflict as a holy war. Thanks to the emergence of modern media, a steady stream of patriotic and militaristic rhetoric was given to an unprecedented audience, using language that spoke of holy war and crusade, of apocalypse and Armageddon. But this rhetoric was not mere state propaganda. Jenkins reveals how the widespread belief in angels and apparitions, visions and the supernatural was a driving force throughout the war and shaped all three of the major religions—Christianity, Judaism and Islam—paving the way for modern views of religion and violence. The disappointed hopes and moral compromises that followed the war also shaped the political climate of the rest of the century, giving rise to such phenomena as Nazism, totalitarianism, and communism. Connecting numerous remarkable incidents and characters—from Karl Barth to Carl Jung, the Christmas Truce to the Armenian Genocide—Jenkins creates a powerful and persuasive narrative that brings together global politics, history, and spiritual crisis as never before and shows how religion informed and motivated circumstances on all sides of the war.

Blacks And Whites In Christian America

Author: Jason E. Shelton
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814722784
Size: 58.38 MB
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2012 Winner of the C. Calvin Smith Award presented by the Southern Conference on African American Studies, Inc. 2014 Honorable Mention for the Distinguished Book Award presented by the American Sociological Association's Sociology of Religion Section Conventional wisdom holds that Christians, as members of a “universal” religion, all believe more or less the same things when it comes to their faith. Yet black and white Christians differ in significant ways, from their frequency of praying or attending services to whether they regularly read the Bible or believe in Heaven or Hell. In this engaging and accessible sociological study of white and black Christian beliefs, Jason E. Shelton and Michael O. Emerson push beyond establishing that there are racial differences in belief and practice among members of American Protestantism to explore why those differences exist. Drawing on the most comprehensive and systematic empirical analysis of African American religious actions and beliefs to date, they delineate five building blocks of black Protestant faith which have emerged from the particular dynamics of American race relations. Shelton and Emerson find that America’s history of racial oppression has had a deep and fundamental effect on the religious beliefs and practices of blacks and whites across America.

Pillars Of Faith

Author: Nancy Tatom Ammerman
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520243129
Size: 55.81 MB
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"This book will be a classic in the field. It does something no other book has done—it shows, with one of the most impressive sets of data I have ever seen, what congregations do and how they go about doing it."—Michael Emerson, author of Divided by Faith "Ammerman demonstrates rare mastery in a book that is brimming with original research and original thinking. The material is well organized, and the author has an eye for the well-turned phrase. This is a book of great importance that gives us an unprecedented picture of lived American religion while challenging stereotypes and conventional wisdom."—James Wind, President of the Alban Institute, author of Finding a New Voice: The Public Role of Mainline Protestantism