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Dividing Lines

Author: Daniel J. Tichenor
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400824984
Size: 42.56 MB
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Immigration is perhaps the most enduring and elemental leitmotif of America. This book is the most powerful study to date of the politics and policies it has inspired, from the founders' earliest efforts to shape American identity to today's revealing struggles over Third World immigration, noncitizen rights, and illegal aliens. Weaving a robust new theoretical approach into a sweeping history, Daniel Tichenor ties together previous studies' idiosyncratic explanations for particular, pivotal twists and turns of immigration policy. He tells the story of lively political battles between immigration defenders and doubters over time and of the transformative policy regimes they built. Tichenor takes us from vibrant nineteenth-century politics that propelled expansive European admissions and Chinese exclusion to the draconian restrictions that had taken hold by the 1920s, including racist quotas that later hampered the rescue of Jews from the Holocaust. American global leadership and interest group politics in the decades after World War II, he argues, led to a surprising expansion of immigration opportunities. In the 1990s, a surge of restrictionist fervor spurred the political mobilization of recent immigrants. Richly documented, this pathbreaking work shows that a small number of interlocking temporal processes, not least changing institutional opportunities and constraints, underlie the turning tides of immigration sentiments and policy regimes. Complementing a dynamic narrative with a host of helpful tables and timelines, Dividing Lines is the definitive treatment of a phenomenon that has profoundly shaped the character of American nationhood.

Building The Judiciary

Author: Justin Crowe
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400842573
Size: 63.93 MB
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How did the federal judiciary transcend early limitations to become a powerful institution of American governance? How did the Supreme Court move from political irrelevance to political centrality? Building the Judiciary uncovers the causes and consequences of judicial institution-building in the United States from the commencement of the new government in 1789 through the close of the twentieth century. Explaining why and how the federal judiciary became an independent, autonomous, and powerful political institution, Justin Crowe moves away from the notion that the judiciary is exceptional in the scheme of American politics, illustrating instead how it is subject to the same architectonic politics as other political institutions. Arguing that judicial institution-building is fundamentally based on a series of contested questions regarding institutional design and delegation, Crowe develops a theory to explain why political actors seek to build the judiciary and the conditions under which they are successful. He both demonstrates how the motivations of institution-builders ranged from substantive policy to partisan and electoral politics to judicial performance, and details how reform was often provoked by substantial changes in the political universe or transformational entrepreneurship by political leaders. Embedding case studies of landmark institution-building episodes within a contextual understanding of each era under consideration, Crowe presents a historically rich narrative that offers analytically grounded explanations for why judicial institution-building was pursued, how it was accomplished, and what--in the broader scheme of American constitutional democracy--it achieved.

The Rise Of The Conservative Legal Movement

Author: Steven M. Teles
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400829699
Size: 36.86 MB
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Starting in the 1970s, conservatives learned that electoral victory did not easily convert into a reversal of important liberal accomplishments, especially in the law. As a result, conservatives' mobilizing efforts increasingly turned to law schools, professional networks, public interest groups, and the judiciary--areas traditionally controlled by liberals. Drawing from internal documents, as well as interviews with key conservative figures, The Rise of the Conservative Legal Movement examines this sometimes fitful, and still only partially successful, conservative challenge to liberal domination of the law and American legal institutions. Unlike accounts that depict the conservatives as fiendishly skilled, The Rise of the Conservative Legal Movement reveals the formidable challenges that conservatives faced in competing with legal liberalism. Steven Teles explores how conservative mobilization was shaped by the legal profession, the legacy of the liberal movement, and the difficulties in matching strategic opportunities with effective organizational responses. He explains how foundations and groups promoting conservative ideas built a network designed to dislodge legal liberalism from American elite institutions. And he portrays the reality, not of a grand strategy masterfully pursued, but of individuals and political entrepreneurs learning from trial and error. Using previously unavailable materials from the Olin Foundation, Federalist Society, Center for Individual Rights, Institute for Justice, and Law and Economics Center, The Rise of the Conservative Legal Movement provides an unprecedented look at the inner life of the conservative movement. Lawyers, historians, sociologists, political scientists, and activists seeking to learn from the conservative experience in the law will find it compelling reading.

Black And Blue

Author: Paul Frymer
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691134659
Size: 57.38 MB
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In the 1930s, fewer than one in one hundred U.S. labor union members were African American. By 1980, the figure was more than one in five. Black and Blue explores the politics and history that led to this dramatic integration of organized labor. In the process, the book tells a broader story about how the Democratic Party unintentionally sowed the seeds of labor's decline. The labor and civil rights movements are the cornerstones of the Democratic Party, but for much of the twentieth century these movements worked independently of one another. Paul Frymer argues that as Democrats passed separate legislation to promote labor rights and racial equality they split the issues of class and race into two sets of institutions, neither of which had enough authority to integrate the labor movement. From this division, the courts became the leading enforcers of workplace civil rights, threatening unions with bankruptcy if they resisted integration. The courts' previously unappreciated power, however, was also a problem: in diversifying unions, judges and lawyers enfeebled them financially, thus democratizing through destruction. Sharply delineating the double-edged sword of state and legal power, Black and Blue chronicles an achievement that was as problematic as it was remarkable, and that demonstrates the deficiencies of race- and class-based understandings of labor, equality, and power in America.

Why Is There No Labor Party In The United States

Author: Robin Archer
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691127019
Size: 36.44 MB
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Why is the United States the only advanced capitalist country with no labor party? This title puts forward an explanation for why there is no American labor party - an explanation that suggests that much of the conventional wisdom about 'American exceptionalism' is untenable.

Fighting For Democracy

Author: Christopher S. Parker
Publisher: Princeton Univ Pr
ISBN: 9780691140032
Size: 80.83 MB
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Fighting for Democracy shows how the experiences of African American soldiers during World War II and the Korean War influenced many of them to challenge white supremacy in the South when they returned home. Focusing on the motivations of individual black veterans, this groundbreaking book explores the relationship between military service and political activism. Christopher Parker draws on unique sources of evidence, including interviews and survey data, to illustrate how and why black servicemen who fought for their country in wartime returned to America prepared to fight for their own equality.Parker discusses the history of African American military service and how the wartime experiences of black veterans inspired them to contest Jim Crow. Black veterans gained courage and confidence by fighting their nation's enemies on the battlefield and racism in the ranks. Viewing their military service as patriotic sacrifice in the defense of democracy, these veterans returned home with the determination and commitment to pursue equality and social reform in the South. Just as they had risked their lives to protect democratic rights while abroad, they risked their lives to demand those same rights on the domestic front.Providing a sophisticated understanding of how war abroad impacts efforts for social change at home, Fighting for Democracy recovers a vital story about black veterans and demonstrates their distinct contributions to the American political landscape.

Fremde In Unserer Mitte

Author: David Miller
Publisher: Suhrkamp Verlag
ISBN: 3518754262
Size: 49.75 MB
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Das Thema Einwanderung wirft gewichtige gesellschaftspolitische, moralische und ethische Fragen auf, die seit einiger Zeit im Zentrum intensiver Debatten stehen. Der renommierte britische Philosoph David Miller verteidigt in seinem Buch eine Position zwischen einem starken Kosmopolitismus, der für uneingeschränkte Bewegungsfreiheit und offene Grenzen plädiert, und einem blinden Nationalismus, der oft in pauschale Ausländerfeindlichkeit und dumpfen Rassismus umschlägt. In ständiger Auseinandersetzung mit Gegenargumenten entwickelt er seinen Standpunkt, der die Rechte sowohl der Immigranten als auch der Staatsbürger berücksichtigen soll – und einen schwachen Kosmopolitismus ebenso einschließt wie das Recht von Nationalstaaten, ihre Grenzen zu kontrollieren. Ziel von Millers Ausführungen ist eine Immigrationspolitik liberaler Demokratien, die so gerecht ist wie möglich und so realistisch wie nötig. Ein beeindruckend präzise und nüchtern argumentierendes Buch, das zum Nachdenken anregt und zum Widerspruch reizt.

Zum Ewigen Frieden Und Andere Schriften

Author: Immanuel Kant
Publisher: S. Fischer Verlag
ISBN: 3104018979
Size: 21.74 MB
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Mit dem Werkbeitrag aus Kindlers Literatur Lexikon. Mit dem Autorenporträt aus dem Metzler Philosophen Lexikon. Mit Daten zu Leben und Werk, exklusiv verfasst von der Redaktion der Zeitschrift für Literatur TEXT + KRITIK. In einer seiner bekanntesten Schriften entwickelt Immanuel Kant mit atemberaubender Modernität ein Staatskonzept, das zum ›Ewigen Frieden‹ nicht nur eine politisch argumentierende Öffentlichkeit voraussetzt, sondern auch internationale Rechtsverbindlichkeit fordert. 150 Jahre später beginnen die Vereinten Nationen ihre Arbeit daran. Aber Kant mischt sich in seinen anderen Schriften auch in Fragen der Alltagskultur ein, die nichts an Aktualität verloren haben, zum Beispiel das Raubkopieren ...

Die Gegen Demokratie

Author: Pierre Rosanvallon
Publisher: Hamburger Edition HIS
ISBN: 3868549269
Size: 61.14 MB
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Obgleich das demokratische Ideal uneingeschränkt bejaht wird, stehen die Systeme, die sich auf das Ideal berufen, immer heftiger in der Kritik. Doch diese Differenz ist nicht so neu, wie sie scheint: Historisch betrachtet ist die Demokratie immer schon als Versprechen und Problem zugleich in Erscheinung getreten. Denn der Grundsatz, Regierungen durch den Wählerwillen zu legitimieren, ging stets mit Misstrauensbekundungen der Bürger gegenüber den etablierten Mächten einher. Die Gegen-Demokratie ist nicht das Gegenteil von Demokratie, sie ist Bestandteil der parlamentarisch-repräsentativen Demokratie, somit permanenter Ausdruck von Misstrauen gegenüber den gewählten Institutionen. Gleichzeitig ist sie aber auch Ausdruck des politischen Engagements der Bürger_innen jenseits der Wahlurnen. Der Begriff Gegen-Demokratie hebt das Widersprüchliche des Misstrauens hervor, das einerseits die Wachsamkeit der Bürger_innen fördert und auf diese Weise dazu beiträgt, die staatlichen Instanzen für gesellschaftliche Forderungen empfänglicher zu machen, das andererseits aber auch destruktive Formen von Ablehnung und Verleumdung begünstigen kann. Das heißt: Die Gegen-Demokratie bestätigt nicht nur, sie kann auch widersprechen. Rosanvallon entfaltet die verschiedenen Aspekte von Gegen-Demokratie und schreibt ihre Geschichte. Nicht zuletzt plädiert er dafür, die ständige Rede von der Politikverdrossenheit zu überdenken. Denn es ist eher von einem Wandel als von einem Niedergang des bürgerschaftlichen Engagements zu sprechen. Verändert haben sich lediglich das Repertoire, die Träger und die Ziele des politischen Ausdrucks. Die Bürger_innen haben inzwischen viele Alternativen zum Wahlzettel, um ihre Sorgen und Beschwerden zu artikulieren. Die politische Form der Gegen-Demokratie sollte im Diskurs der Politikverdrossenheit nicht unterschätzt, sondern aktiv genutzt werden.