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Doing Anthropological Research

Author: Natalie Konopinski
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135010129
Size: 18.93 MB
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Doing Anthropological Research provides a practical toolkit for carrying out research. It works through the process chapter by chapter, from the planning and proposal stage to methodologies, secondary research, ethnographic fieldwork, ethical concerns, and writing strategies. Case study examples are provided throughout to illustrate the particular issues and dilemmas that may be encountered. This handy guide will be invaluable to upper-level undergraduate and postgraduate students who are studying or intending to use anthropological methods in their research.

Applied Anthropology

Author: Erve Chambers
Publisher: Waveland PressInc
ISBN: 9780881334494
Size: 27.35 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Several of the various ways of applying anthropological research and analysis to everyday social and political life are examined in this book that also discusses the role of culture brokers, public policy formation and implementation, medical anthropology, anthropology and education, and evaluation. Drawing on a wide range of examples and illustrating the variety of roles anthropologists have enacted, Chambers shows the real and potential impact of anthropology in both developing and industrialized societies.

Using Anthropology In The World

Author: Riall W. Nolan
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 135185691X
Size: 27.51 MB
Format: PDF
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Anthropologist practitioners work outside the confines of the university, putting their knowledge and skills to work on significant problems in a wide variety of different contexts. The demand for anthropologist practitioners is strong and growing; practice is in many ways the leading edge of anthropology today, and one of the most exciting aspects of the discipline. How can anthropology students prepare themselves to become practitioners? Specifically designed to help students, including those in more traditional training programs, prepare for a career in putting anthropology to work in the world, the book: - provides an introduction to the discipline of anthropology and an exploration of its role and contribution in today’s world; - outlines the shape of anthropological practice – what it is, how it developed historically, and what it looks like today; - describes how students of anthropology can prepare for a career in practice, with emphasis on the relationship between theory, method, and application; - includes short contributions from practitioners, writing on specific aspects of training, practice, and career planning; - sets out a framework for career planning, with specific and detailed discussions of finding and securing employment; - reviews some of the more salient challenges arising in the course of a practitioner career; and - concludes with a discussion of what the future of anthropological practice is likely to be. Using Anthropology in the World is essential reading for students interested in preparing themselves for the challenges and rewards of practice and application.

An Introduction To Social Anthropology

Author: Joy Hendry
Publisher: Palgrave
ISBN: 1137431555
Size: 67.34 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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An Introduction to Social Anthropology opens up the field of social and cultural anthropology, demonstrating its value for building an understanding of the vast diversity of human societies and cultures that make up the world today. Without assuming any prior knowledge, the book gradually leads the reader from some of the discipline's earliest foundational approaches and theories, through the fundamental areas that make up contemporary anthropology. Taking a truly global and holistic view, it includes case studies from far away as well as closer to home, wherever you might be reading it, touching on a range of topics that both divide and connect us, such as family, marriage and religion. This third edition closes with a new chapter discussing the role of social and cultural anthropologists and the specific methods they use in a fast-changing world. This is an inviting, engaging and enjoyable text that aims to smooth the journey for new or prospective anthropology students seeking to better understand the discipline and its roots. Offering illustrations, plentiful further readings and films, first-hand accounts of people across the world, and a number of thorny topics for reflection, the book makes an ideal text for sharing and discussing in the classroom too.

Cultural Anthropology An Applied Perspective

Author: Gary Ferraro
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 0495100080
Size: 20.33 MB
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Explore cultural anthropology in an applied and fascinating way with Gary Ferraro's CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY: AN APPLIED PERSPECTIVE. This contemporary and student-relevant text gives you all the key material you need for your introductory course, plus it will show you that anthropology is for you! With real world applications of the principles and practices of anthropology, this book will help you learn to appreciate other cultures as well as your own. Apply what you learn in this course to those situations that you are likely to encounter in your personal and professional life. What can you do with anthropology today? Check out the real-life examples of cross-cultural misunderstandings and issues (in our popular Cross-Cultural Miscues features) to view 'culture at work.' Also, the book takes a look at specialized vocabularies as illustrated by chickspeak (the language of single, urban, upwardly mobile women), the war in Iraq, environmental degradation, and other contemporary topics. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Ethnoprimatology

Author: Kerry M. Dore
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316982688
Size: 64.38 MB
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Ethnoprimatology, the combining of primatological and anthropological practice and the viewing of humans and other primates as living in integrated and shared ecological and social spaces, has become an increasingly popular approach to primate studies in the twenty-first century. Offering an insight into the investigation and documentation of human-nonhuman primate relations in the Anthropocene, this book guides the reader through the preparation, design, implementation, and analysis of an ethnoprimatological research project, offering practical examples of the vast array of methods and techniques at chapter level. With contributions from the world's leading experts in the field, Ethnoprimatology critically analyses current primate conservation efforts, outlines their major research questions, theoretical bases and methods, and tackles the challenges and complexities involved in mixed-methods research. Documenting the spectrum of current research in the field, it is an ideal volume for students and researchers in ethnoprimatology, primatology, anthropology, and conservation biology.

Doing Health Anthropology

Author: Christie W. Kiefer, PhD
Publisher: Springer Publishing Company
ISBN: 9780826115584
Size: 32.69 MB
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What is the relationship between health, human nature, and human needs? The impact of social change on communities? The processes by which communities confront and overcome their health problems? How do we study these health questions in new communities and become advocates for change? These are critical questions in confronting the social causes of ill health, yet many health students do not have the appropriate training in the anthropological methods and techniques that help answer them. Christie Kiefer has written Doing Health Anthropology to prompt students to enter the community already prepared in these methods so that they can accurately ask and solve these important questions themselves. Using this book as a guide, students learn to integrate cultural anthropology with health science and come to their own conclusions based on field research. The book includes common pitfalls to avoid when conducting interviews and observations, and ways to formulate and answer research questions, maintain field notes and other records, and correctly analyze qualitative data. With the help of this text, practitioners and students alike will be able to integrate cultural anthropology methods of research into their health science investigations and community health initiatives. For news and to learn more about how you can implement a community approach to building global health and social justice, visit

Doing Developmental Research

Author: Tricia Striano
Publisher: Guilford Publications
ISBN: 1462524443
Size: 72.75 MB
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Addressing practical issues rarely covered in methods texts, this user-friendly, jargon-free book helps students and beginning researchers plan infant and child development studies and get them done. The author provides step-by-step guidance for getting involved in a developmental laboratory and crafting effective research questions and proposals. Tips on recruiting study participants cover access issues--such as how to overcome language and cultural barriers--and include helpful sample scripts. The book offers time management strategies, pointers for organizing and communicating data, and a roadmap of the journal publication process, complete with an annotated sample article. Numerous concrete examples, checklists, worksheets, and exercises are featured. Reproducible forms can be downloaded and printed in a convenient 8 1/2" x 11" size. Pedagogical Features *Chapter subheadings written as questions to help students quickly find the answers they need. *Key tips and checklists for managing each phase of a study. *Exercises that build core research skills. *Annotated sample journal article with commentary on the writing and publication process.

Making Sense Of Field Research

Author: Sheila Pontis
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351819119
Size: 59.11 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Learn how to use field research to bring essential people-centred insights to your information design projects. Information design is recognized as the practice of making complex data and information understandable for a particular audience, but what’s often overlooked is the importance of understanding the audience themselves during the information design process. Rather than rely on intuition or assumptions, information designers need evidence gathered from real people about how they think, feel, and behave in order to inform the design of effective solutions. To do this, they need field research. If you’re unsure about field research and how it might fit into a project, this book is for you. This text presents practical, easy-to-follow instructions for planning, designing, and conducting a field study, as well as guidance for making sense of field data and translating findings into action. The selection of established methods and techniques, drawn from social sciences, anthropology, and participatory design, is geared specifically toward information design problems. Over 80 illustrations and five real-world case studies bring key principles and methods of field research to life. Whether you are designing a family of icons or a large-scale signage system, an instruction manual or an interactive data visualization, this book will guide you through the necessary steps to ensure you are meeting people’s needs.