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Ecological Imperialism

Author: Alfred W. Crosby
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316453960
Size: 29.27 MB
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People of European descent form the bulk of the population in most of the temperate zones of the world - North America, Australia and New Zealand. The military successes of European imperialism are easy to explain; in many cases they were a matter of firearms against spears. But as Alfred W. Crosby maintains in this highly original and fascinating book, the Europeans' displacement and replacement of the native peoples in the temperate zones was more a matter of biology than of military conquest. European organisms had certain decisive advantages over their New World and Australian counterparts. The spread of European disease, flora and fauna went hand in hand with the growth of populations. Consequently, these imperialists became proprietors of the most important agricultural lands in the world. In the second edition, Crosby revisits his now classic work and again evaluates the global historical importance of European ecological expansion.

The Measure Of Reality

Author: Alfred W. Crosby
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521639903
Size: 77.27 MB
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Profiles the time in European history when people believed that time, space, and distance could be measured, given a number, broken into smaller pieces, and studied.

This Fissured Land

Author: Madhav Gadgil
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520082960
Size: 77.34 MB
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"A masterful study. . . . It does for ecological history what the writings of Marx and Engels did for the study of class relations and social production."--Michael Adas, Rutgers University

Palgrave Advances In World Histories

Author: M. Hughes-Warrington
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230523404
Size: 21.12 MB
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World histories vary widely in shape, structure, and range in space and time. In Palgrave Advances in World Histories, ten leading world historians examine the many forms of world history writing, offering an accessible, engaging and comprehensive overview of what it is and what world historians do. This work is a valuable introduction to those new to the field, but will also stimulate discussion, debate and reflection.

The Conquest Of Nature Water Landscape And The Making Of Modern Germany

Author: David Blackbourn
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 1324000988
Size: 35.79 MB
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"Brilliantly conceived....[A] tour de force in historical writing."—Ian Kershaw Majestic and lyrically written, The Conquest of Nature traces the rise of Germany through the development of water and landscape. David Blackbourn begins his morality tale in the mid-1700s, with the epic story of Frederick the Great, who attempted—by importing the great scientific minds of the West and by harnessing the power of his army—to transform the uninhabitable marshlands of his scattered kingdom into a modern state. Chronicling the great engineering projects that reshaped the mighty Rhine, the emergence of an ambitious German navy, and the development of hydroelectric power to fuel Germany's convulsive industrial growth before World War I, Blackbourn goes on to show how Nazi racial policies rested on German ideas of mastery of the natural world. Filled with striking reproductions of paintings, maps, and photographs, this grand work of modern history links culture, politics, and the environment in an exploration of the perils faced by nations that attempt to conquer nature.

Throwing Fire

Author: Alfred W. Crosby
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521791588
Size: 21.43 MB
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Historian Alfred W. Crosby looks at hard, accurate throwing and the manipulation of fire as unique human capabilities. Humans began throwing rocks in prehistory and then progressed to javelins, atlatls, bows and arrows. We learned to make fire by friction and used it to cook, drive game, burn out rivals, and alter landscapes. In historic times we invented catapults, trebuchets, and such flammable liquids as Greek Fire. About 1,000 years ago we invented gunpowder, which accelerated the rise of empires and the advance of European imperialism. In the 20th century, gunpowder weaponry enabled us to wage the most destructive wars of all time, peaking at the end of World War II with the V-2 and atomic bomb. Today, we have turned our projectile talents to space travel which may make it possible for our species to migrate to other bodies of our solar system and even other star systems.

Chocolate Cities

Author: Marcus Anthony Hunter
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520292820
Size: 55.24 MB
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When you think of a map of the United States, what do you see? Now think of the Seattle that begot Jimi Hendrix. The Dallas that shaped Erykah Badu. The Holly Springs, Mississippi, that compelled Ida B. Wells to activism against lynching. The Birmingham where Martin Luther King, Jr., penned his most famous missive. Now how do you see the United States? Chocolate Cities offers a new cartography of the United States—a “Black Map” that more accurately reflects the lived experiences and the future of Black life in America. Drawing on cultural sources such as film, music, fiction, and plays, and on traditional resources like Census data, oral histories, ethnographies, and health and wealth data, the book offers a new perspective for analyzing, mapping, and understanding the ebbs and flows of the Black American experience—all in the cities, towns, neighborhoods, and communities that Black Americans have created and defended. Black maps are consequentially different from our current geographical understanding of race and place in America. And as the United States moves toward a majority minority society, Chocolate Cities provides a broad and necessary assessment of how racial and ethnic minorities make and change America’s social, economic, and political landscape.

Green Imperialism

Author: Richard H. Grove
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521565134
Size: 38.88 MB
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Green Imperialism is the first book to document the origins and early history of environmentalism, concentrating especially on its hitherto unexplained colonial and global aspects. It highlights the significance of Utopian, Physiocratic, and medical thinking in the history of environmentalist ideas. The book shows how the new critique of the colonial impact on the environment depended on the emergence of a coterie of professional scientists, and demonstrates both the importance of the oceanic island "Eden" as a vehicle for new conceptions of nature and the significance of colonial island environments in stimulating conservationist notions.

Burning The Reichstag

Author: Benjamin Carter Hett
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199322325
Size: 67.28 MB
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Delving into the controversy surrounding the fire that burned down the Reichstag and ignited the Third Reich, this gripping account of Hitler's rise to dictatorship reopens the arson case, profiling key figures and making use of new sources and archives to reinvestigate one of the greatest mysteries of the Nazi period.

Plows Plagues And Petroleum

Author: William F. Ruddiman
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400834730
Size: 21.33 MB
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The impact on climate from 200 years of industrial development is an everyday fact of life, but did humankind's active involvement in climate change really begin with the industrial revolution, as commonly believed? Plows, Plagues, and Petroleum has sparked lively scientific debate since it was first published--arguing that humans have actually been changing the climate for some 8,000 years--as a result of the earlier discovery of agriculture. The "Ruddiman Hypothesis" will spark intense debate. We learn that the impact of farming on greenhouse-gas levels, thousands of years before the industrial revolution, kept our planet notably warmer than if natural climate cycles had prevailed--quite possibly forestalling a new ice age. Plows, Plagues, and Petroleum is the first book to trace the full historical sweep of human interaction with Earth's climate. Ruddiman takes us through three broad stages of human history: when nature was in control; when humans began to take control, discovering agriculture and affecting climate through carbon dioxide and methane emissions; and, finally, the more recent human impact on climate change. Along the way he raises the fascinating possibility that plagues, by depleting human populations, also affected reforestation and thus climate--as suggested by dips in greenhouse gases when major pandemics have occurred. While our massive usage of fossil fuels has certainly contributed to modern climate change, Ruddiman shows that industrial growth is only part of the picture. The book concludes by looking to the future and critiquing the impact of special interest money on the global warming debate. In the afterword, Ruddiman explores the main challenges posed to his hypothesis, and shows how recent investigations and findings ultimately strengthen the book's original claims.