Download empires workshop latin america the united states and the rise of the new imperialism american empire project in pdf or read empires workshop latin america the united states and the rise of the new imperialism american empire project in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get empires workshop latin america the united states and the rise of the new imperialism american empire project in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Empire S Workshop

Author: Greg Grandin
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780805077384
Size: 41.18 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 7578
Download and Read
Provides a thought-provoking study of the role of Latin America as a proving ground for American imperial strategies and tactics, from Thomas Jefferson's campaign in Cuba and Spanish Florida to Reagan's support for oppresive, U.S.-friendly regimes in Central America. 25,000 first printing.

Forgotten Continent

Author: Michael Reid
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300145268
Size: 42.54 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 6579
Download and Read
Latin America has often been condemned to failure. Not as poor as Africa, nor as booming as India and China, it has largely been overlooked. Yet this vast continent, home to half a billion people, the world's largest reserves of arable land, and 8.5 percent of global oil, is transforming its political and economic landscape. This book argues that Latin America's efforts to build fairer and more prosperous societies make it one of the world's most vigorous laboratories for capitalist democracy. In many countries--including Brazil, Chile and Mexico--democratic leaders are laying the foundations for faster economic growth and more inclusive politics, as well as tackling deep-rooted problems. Failure will increase the flow of drugs and illegal immigrants to the United States and Europe, jeopardize stability in a region rich in strategic commodities, and threaten some of the world's most majestic natural environments.--From publisher description.

Turning The Tide

Author: Noam Chomsky
Publisher: Haymarket Books
ISBN: 1608464474
Size: 80.61 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2017
Download and Read
Noam Chomsky addresses relations throughout Central America and relates these to superpower conflicts and the overall role of the Cold War in contemporary international relations.

Dependency And Development In Latin America Dependencia Y Desarrollo En Am Rica Latina Engl

Author: Fernando Henrique Cardoso
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520035270
Size: 56.91 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 1692
Download and Read
At the end of World War II, several Latin American countries seemed to be ready for industrialization and self-sustaining economic growth. Instead, they found that they had exchanged old forms of political and economic dependence for a new kind of dependency on the international capitalism of multinational corporations. In the much-acclaimed original Spanish edition (Dependencia y Desarrollo en Am�rica Latina) and now in the expanded and revised English version, Cardoso and Faletto offer a sophisticated analysis of the economic development of Latin America. The economic dependency of Latin America stems not merely from the domination of the world market over internal national and "enclave” economies, but also from the much more complex interact ion of economic drives, political structures, social movements, and historically conditioned alliances. While heeding the unique histories of individual nations, the authors discern four general stages in Latin America's economic development: the early outward expansion of newly independent nations, the political emergence of the middle sector, the formation of internal markets in response to population growth, and the new dependence on international markets. In a postscript for this edition, Cardoso and Faletto examine the political, social and economic changes of the past ten years in light of their original hypotheses.

Fordlandia

Author: Greg Grandin
Publisher: Metropolitan Books
ISBN: 9781429938013
Size: 50.97 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5115
Download and Read
The stunning, never before told story of the quixotic attempt to recreate small-town America in the heart of the Amazon In 1927, Henry Ford, the richest man in the world, bought a tract of land twice the size of Delaware in the Brazilian Amazon. His intention was to grow rubber, but the project rapidly evolved into a more ambitious bid to export America itself, along with its golf courses, ice-cream shops, bandstands, indoor plumbing, and Model Ts rolling down broad streets. Fordlandia, as the settlement was called, quickly became the site of an epic clash. On one side was the car magnate, lean, austere, the man who reduced industrial production to its simplest motions; on the other, the Amazon, lush, extravagant, the most complex ecological system on the planet. Ford's early success in imposing time clocks and square dances on the jungle soon collapsed, as indigenous workers, rejecting his midwestern Puritanism, turned the place into a ribald tropical boomtown. Fordlandia's eventual demise as a rubber plantation foreshadowed the practices that today are laying waste to the rain forest. More than a parable of one man's arrogant attempt to force his will on the natural world, Fordlandia depicts a desperate quest to salvage the bygone America that the Ford factory system did much to dispatch. As Greg Grandin shows in this gripping and mordantly observed history, Ford's great delusion was not that the Amazon could be tamed but that the forces of capitalism, once released, might yet be contained. Fordlandia is a 2009 National Book Award Finalist for Nonfiction.

The Empire Of Necessity

Author: Greg Grandin
Publisher: Oneworld Publications
ISBN: 1780744110
Size: 80.48 MB
Format: PDF
View: 6266
Download and Read
Discover the story of a real-life Captain Ahab of the slave trade, in a landmark book by one of today’s most original and highly acclaimed historians One morning in 1805, off a remote island in the South Pacific, seal hunter and abolitionist Captain Amasa Delano climbed aboard the Tryal, a distressed Spanish slaver. He spent all day on the ship, sharing food and water, yet failed to see that the slaves, having slaughtered most of the crew, were now their own masters. Later, when Delano realized the deception, he chased the ship down, responding with barbaric violence. Drawing on never-before-consulted records on four continents, Greg Grandin follows this group of courageous slaves and their persecutor from the horrors of the Middle Passage to their explosive confrontation. The Empire of Necessity is a gripping account of obsessive mania, imperial exploitation, and lost ideals, capturing the epic clash of peoples, economies, and faiths that was shaping the so-called New World and the Age of Revolution.

The Last Colonial Massacre

Author: Greg Grandin
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226306909
Size: 20.24 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 6278
Download and Read
After decades of bloodshed and political terror, many lament the rise of the left in Latin America. Since the triumph of Castro, politicians and historians have accused the left there of rejecting democracy, embracing communist totalitarianism, and prompting both revolutionary violence and a right-wing backlash. Through unprecedented archival research and gripping personal testimonies, Greg Grandin powerfully challenges these views in this classic work. In doing so, he uncovers the hidden history of the Latin American Cold War: of hidebound reactionaries holding on to their power and privilege; of Mayan Marxists blending indigenous notions of justice with universal ideas of equality; and of a United States supporting new styles of state terror throughout the region. With Guatemala as his case study, Grandin argues that the Latin American Cold War was a struggle not between political liberalism and Soviet communism but two visions of democracy—one vibrant and egalitarian, the other tepid and unequal—and that the conflict’s main effect was to eliminate homegrown notions of social democracy. Updated with a new preface by the author and an interview with Naomi Klein, The Last Colonial Massacre is history of the highest order—a work that will dramatically recast our understanding of Latin American politics and the role of the United States in the Cold War and beyond. “This work admirably explains the process in which hopes of democracy were brutally repressed in Guatemala and its people experienced a civil war lasting for half a century.”—International History Review “A richly detailed, humane, and passionately subversive portrait of inspiring reformers tragically redefined by the Cold War as enemies of the state.”—Journal of American History

Overthrow

Author: Stephen Kinzer
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0805082409
Size: 78.77 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5800
Download and Read
Offers a narrative history of the role of the U.S. in a series of coups, revolutions, and invasions that toppled fourteen foreign governments, from the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy in 1893 to the 2003 war in Iraq, and examines the sometimes disastrous long-term repercussions of such operations. Reprint.

I Rigoberta Menchu

Author: Rigoberta Menchu
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 1844674711
Size: 24.79 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 1904
Download and Read
Now a global bestseller, the remarkable life of Rigoberta Menchú, a Guatemalan peasant woman, reflects on the experiences common to many Indian communities in Latin America. Menchú suffered gross injustice and hardship in her early life: her brother, father and mother were murdered by the Guatemalan military. She learned Spanish and turned to catechistic work as an expression of political revolt as well as religious commitment. Menchú vividly conveys the traditional beliefs of her community and her personal response to feminist and socialist ideas. Above all, these pages are illuminated by the enduring courage and passionate sense of justice of an extraordinary woman.

Empire S Guest Workers

Author: Matthew Casey
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107127696
Size: 25.80 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 873
Download and Read
Haitian seasonal migration to Cuba is central to narratives about race, national development, and US imperialism in the early twentieth-century Caribbean. Filling a major gap in literature, this innovative study reconstructs Haitian guest workers' lived experiences as they moved among the rural and urban areas of Haiti, and the sugar plantations, coffee farms, and cities of eastern Cuba. It offers an unprecedented glimpse into the daily workings of empire, labor, and political economy in Haiti and Cuba. Migrants' efforts to improve their living and working conditions and practice their religions shaped migration policies, economic realities, ideas of race, and Caribbean spirituality in Haiti and Cuba as each experienced US imperialism.