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Everyday Injustice

Author: Maria Chávez
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 1442209194
Size: 80.35 MB
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As members of the fastest-growing demographic group in America, Latinos are increasingly represented in the professional class, but they continue to face significant racism. Everyday Injustice introduces readers to the challenges facing Latino professionals today. Despite considerable success in overcoming educational, economic, and class barriers, Latino professionals still experience marginalization. Everyday Injustice is a powerful illustration of racism and inequality in America.

Everyday White People Confront Racial And Social Injustice

Author: Eddie Moore
Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 1620362104
Size: 29.23 MB
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While we are all familiar with the lives of prominent Black civil rights leaders, few of us have a sense of what is entailed in developing a White anti-racist identity. Few of us can name the White activists who joined the struggle against discrimination, let alone understand the complexities, stresses and contradictions of doing this work while benefiting from the privileges they enjoyed as Whites. This book fills that gap by vividly presenting – in their own words – the personal stories, experiences and reflections of fifteen prominent White anti-racists. They recount the circumstances that led them to undertake this work, describe key moments and insights along their journeys, and frankly admit their continuing lapses and mistakes. They make it clear that confronting oppression (including their own prejudices) – whether about race, sexual orientation, ability or other differences – is a lifelong process of learning. The chapters in this book are full of inspirational and lesson-rich stories about the expanding awareness of White social justice advocates and activists who grappled with their White privilege and their early socialization and decided to work against structural injustice and personal prejudice. The authors are also self-critical, questioning their motivations and commitments, and acknowledging that – as Whites and possessors of other privileged identities – they continue to benefit from White privilege even as they work against it. This is an eye-opening book for anyone who wants to understand what it means to be White and the reality of what is involved in becoming a White anti-racist and social justice advocate; is interested in the paths taken by those who have gone before; and wants to engage reflectively and critically in this difficult and important work. Contributing Authors Warren J. Blumenfeld Abby L. Ferber Jane K. Fernandes Michelle Fine Diane J. Goodman Paul C. Gorski Heather W. Hackman Gary R. Howard Kevin Jennings Frances E. Kendall Paul Kivel James W. Loewen Peggy McIntosh Julie O’Mara Alan Rabinowitz Andrea Rabinowitz Christine E. Sleeter

Everyday Peace Politics Citizenship And Muslim Lives In India

Author: Philippa Williams
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118837800
Size: 22.29 MB
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Providing important insights into political geography, the politics of peace, and South Asian studies, this book explores everyday peace in northern India as it is experienced by the Hindu-Muslim community. Challenges normative understandings of Hindu-Muslim relations as relentlessly violent and the notion of peace as a romantic endpoint occurring only after violence and political maneuverings Examines the ways in which geographical concepts such as space, place, and scale can inform and problematize understandings of peace Redefines the politics of peace, as well as concepts of citizenship, agency, secular politics, and democracy Based on over 14 months of qualitative and archival research in the city of Varanasi in Uttar Pradesh, India

Injustice Revised Edition

Author: Daniel Dorling
Publisher: Policy Press
ISBN: 1447320751
Size: 69.34 MB
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In the five years since the first edition of Danny Dorling's Injustice was published, poverty, hunger, and destitution have increased dramatically in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. Globally, the richest 1% have never held a greater share of world wealth, while the share held by most of the other 99% has collapsed, with more and more people in debt, especially the young. And as long as we tolerate the injustices that underpin this inequality, it will persist and, terrifyingly, continue to grow. This fully rewritten and updated edition of Dorling's approachable yet authoritative, hard-hitting, and uncompromising book revisits his claim that the five social evils identified by Beveridge at the dawn of the British welfare state (ignorance, want, idleness, squalor, and disease) are being replaced by five new tenets of injustice: elitism is efficient; exclusion is necessary; prejudice is natural; greed is good; and despair is inevitable. By showing these beliefs are unfounded, Dorling offers hope of a more equal society even in these most remarkable and dangerous times. With every year that passes, it is more evident that Dorling's call to action is essential reading for anyone concerned with social justice.

Everyday Exposure

Author: Sarah Marie Wiebe
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 0774832665
Size: 54.10 MB
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Surrounded by Canada’s densest concentration of chemical manufacturing plants, members of the Aamjiwnaang First Nation express concern about a declining male birth rate and high incidences of miscarriage, asthma, cancer, and cardiovascular illness. Everyday Exposure uncovers the systemic injustices they face as they fight for environmental justice. Exploring the problems that conflicting levels of jurisdiction pose for the creation of effective policy, analyzing clashes between Indigenous and scientific knowledge, and documenting the experiences of Aamjiwnaang residents as they navigate their toxic environment, this book argues that social and political change requires a transformative “sensing policy” approach, one that takes the voices of Indigenous citizens seriously.

Ordinary Injustice

Author: Amy Bach
Publisher: Metropolitan Books
ISBN: 9781429984270
Size: 63.30 MB
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"A groundbreaking book . . . revealing the systemic, everyday problems in our courts that must be addressed if justice is truly to be served."—Doris Kearns Goodwin Attorney and journalist Amy Bach spent eight years investigating the widespread courtroom failures that each day upend lives across America. What she found was an assembly-line approach to justice: a system that rewards mediocre advocacy, bypasses due process, and shortchanges both defendants and victims to keep the court calendar moving. Here is the public defender who pleads most of his clients guilty with scant knowledge about their circumstances; the judge who sets outrageous bail for negligible crimes; the prosecutor who habitually declines to pursue significant cases; the court that works together to achieve a wrongful conviction. Going beyond the usual explanations of bad apples and meager funding, Ordinary Injustice reveals a clubby legal culture of compromise, and shows the tragic consequences that result when communities mistake the rules that lawyers play by for the rule of law. It is time, Bach argues, to institute a new method of checks and balances that will make injustice visible—the first and necessary step to reform.

Anatomy Of Injustice

Author: Raymond Bonner
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307948544
Size: 15.46 MB
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From Pulitzer Prize winner Raymond Bonner, the gripping story of a grievously mishandled murder case that put a twenty-three-year-old man on death row. In January 1982, an elderly white widow was found brutally murdered in the small town of Greenwood, South Carolina. Police immediately arrested Edward Lee Elmore, a semiliterate, mentally retarded black man with no previous felony record. His only connection to the victim was having cleaned her gutters and windows, but barely ninety days after the victim's body was found, he was tried, convicted, and sentenced to death. Elmore had been on death row for eleven years when a young attorney named Diana Holt first learned of his case. With the exemplary moral commitment and tenacious investigation that have distinguished his reporting career, Bonner follows Holt's battle to save Elmore's life and shows us how his case is a textbook example of what can go wrong in the American justice system. Moving, enraging, suspenseful, and enlightening, Anatomy of Injustice is a vital contribution to our nation's ongoing, increasingly important debate about inequality and the death penalty.

Injustice

Author: J. Christian Adams
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1596982845
Size: 32.53 MB
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The Department of Justice is America’s premier federal law enforcement agency. And according to J. Christian Adams, it’s also a base used by leftwing radicals to impose a fringe agenda on the American people. A five-year veteran of the DOJ and a key attorney in pursuing the New Black Panther voter intimidation case, Adams recounts the shocking story of how a once-storied federal agency, the DOJ’s Civil Rights division has degenerated into a politicized fiefdom for far-left militants, where the enforcement of the law depends on the race of the victim.

Injustice

Author: Lee Goodman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1476728062
Size: 41.79 MB
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From the author of the “stellar” (Publishers Weekly) Indefensible comes a “complex and intelligent” (John Lescroart, New York Times bestselling author) legal mystery and courtroom drama that inhabits the blurry boundary between guilt and innocence when a murder sends one family’s life into a tailspin. Someone close to Nick Davis is murdered. Investigators see it as either a case of mistaken identity or the work of a jealous fiancé. As a federal prosecutor, Nick tries shepherding the case to a swift conclusion, but it keeps slipping away. Meanwhile, Nick’s relationship with his wife, Tina, hangs by the thinnest of threads. She is also a lawyer, working to vindicate a young man convicted of killing a child eight years previously. When old DNA evidence is uncovered in the murder case, its analysis hurls Nick’s universe into upheaval—his most basic assumptions about his life, the law, and the people he loves most are thrown into question. “Compelling” with “language that sings,” Lee Goodman’s latest novel is a truly “outstanding” page-turner (William Kent Krueger, New York Times bestselling author).

Racial Profiling

Author: Alison Marie Behnke
Publisher: Twenty-First Century Books
ISBN: 1512439207
Size: 20.79 MB
Format: PDF
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In the United States, racial profiling affects thousands of Americans every day. Both individuals and institutionssuch as law enforcement agencies, government bodies, and schoolsroutinely use race or ethnicity as grounds for suspecting someone of an offense. The high-profile deaths of unarmed people of color at the hands of police officers have brought renewed national attention to racial profiling and have inspired grassroots activism from groups such as Black Lives Matter. Combining rigorous research with powerful personal stories, this insightful title explores the history, the many manifestations, and the consequences of this form of social injustice.