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Explorers And Settlers Of Spanish Texas

Author: Donald Eugene Chipman
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292793154
Size: 48.52 MB
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In Notable Men and Women of Spanish Texas, Donald Chipman and Harriett Joseph combined dramatic, real-life incidents, biographical sketches, and historical background to reveal the real human beings behind the legendary figures who discovered, explored, and settled Spanish Texas from 1528 to 1821. Drawing from their earlier book and adapting the language and subject matter to the reading level and interests of middle and high school students, the authors here present the men and women of Spanish Texas for young adult readers and their teachers. These biographies demonstrate how much we have in common with our early forebears. Profiled in this book are: Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca: Ragged Castaway Francisco Vázquez de Coronado: Golden Conquistador María de Agreda: Lady in Blue Alonso de León: Texas Pathfinder Domingo Terán de los Ríos / Francisco Hidalgo: Angry Governor and Man with a Mission Louis St. Denis / Manuela Sánchez: Cavalier and His Bride Antonio Margil de Jesús: God's Donkey Marqués de San Miguel de Aguayo: Chicken War Redeemer Felipe de Rábago y Terán: Sinful Captain José de Escandón y Elguera: Father of South Texas Athanase de Mézières: Troubled Indian Agent Domingo Cabello: Comanche Peacemaker Marqués de Rubí / Antonio Gil Ibarvo: Harsh Inspector and Father of East Texas Bernardo Gutiérrez de Lara / Joaquín de Arredondo: Rebel Captain and Vengeful Royalist Women in Colonial Texas: Pioneer Settlers Women and the Law: Rights and Responsibilities

Notable Men And Women Of Spanish Texas

Author: Donald E. Chipman
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292793163
Size: 16.24 MB
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The Spanish colonial era in Texas (1528-1821) continues to emerge from the shadowy past with every new archaeological and historical discovery. In this book, years of archival sleuthing by Donald E. Chipman and Harriett Denise Joseph now reveal the real human beings behind the legendary figures who discovered, explored, and settled Spanish Texas. By combining dramatic, real-life incidents, biographical sketches, and historical background, the authors bring to life these famous (and sometimes infamous) men of Spanish Texas: Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca Alonso de León Francisco Hidalgo Louis Juchereau de St. Denis Antonio Margil The Marqués de Aguayo Pedro de Rivera Felipe de Rábago José de Escandón Athanase de Mézières The Marqués de Rubí Antonio Gil Ibarvo Domingo Cabello José Bernardo Gutiérrez de Lara Joaquín de Arredondo The authors also devote a chapter to the women of Spanish Texas, drawing on scarce historical clues to tell the stories of both well-known and previously unknown Tejana, Indian, and African women.

Spanish Texas 1519 1821

Author: Donald E. Chipman
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292782632
Size: 60.77 MB
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Modern Texas, like Mexico, traces its beginning to sixteenth-century encounters between Europeans and Indians who contested control over a vast land. Unlike Mexico, however, Texas eventually received the stamp of Anglo-American culture, so that Spanish contributions to present-day Texas tend to be obscured or even unknown. The first edition of Spanish Texas, 1519–1821 (1992) sought to emphasize the significance of the Spanish period in Texas history. Beginning with information on the land and its inhabitants before the arrival of Europeans, the original volume covered major people and events from early exploration to the end of the colonial era. This new edition of Spanish Texas has been extensively revised and expanded to include a wealth of discoveries about Texas history since 1990. The opening chapter on Texas Indians reveals their high degree of independence from European influence and extended control over their own lives. Other chapters incorporate new information on La Salle's Garcitas Creek colony and French influences in Texas, the destruction of the San Sabá mission and the Spanish punitive expedition to the Red River in the late 1750s, and eighteenth-century Bourbon reforms in the Americas. Drawing on their own and others' research, the authors also provide more inclusive coverage of the role of women of various ethnicities in Spanish Texas and of the legal rights of women on the Texas frontier, demonstrating that whether European or Indian, elite or commoner, slave owner or slave, women enjoyed legal protections not heretofore fully appreciated.

From Santa Anna To Selena

Author: Harriett Denise Joseph
Publisher: University of North Texas Press
ISBN: 1574417231
Size: 12.35 MB
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Author Harriett Denise Joseph relates biographies of eleven notable Mexicanos and Tejanos, beginning with Santa Anna and the impact his actions had on Texas. She discusses the myriad contributions of Erasmo and Juan Seguín to Texas history, as well as the factors that led a hero of the Texas Revolution (Juan) to be viewed later as a traitor by his fellow Texans. Admired by many but despised by others, folk hero Juan Nepomuceno Cortina is one of the most controversial figures in the history of nineteenth-century South Texas. Preservationist and historian Adina De Zavala fought to save part of the Alamo site and other significant structures. Labor activist Emma Tenayuca’s youth, passion, courage, and sacrifice merit attention for her efforts to help the working class. Joseph reveals the individual and collective accomplishments of a powerhouse couple, bilingual educator Edmundo Mireles and folklorist-author Jovita González. She recognizes the military and personal battles of Medal of Honor recipient Raul “Roy” Benavidez. Irma Rangel, the first Latina to serve in the Texas House of Representatives, is known for the many “firsts” she achieved during her lifetime. Finally, we read about Selena’s life and career, as well as her tragic death and her continuing marketability.

From Santa Anna To Selena

Author: Harriett Denise Joseph
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781574417159
Size: 53.72 MB
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"A collection of portraits of important people either from Mexico or of Mexican heritage, who had an influence on Texas history. Time period begins in 1821 when Mexico achieved independence from Spain, up to the present."--Publisher.

Black Women In Texas History

Author: Bruce A. Glasrud
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 9781603440318
Size: 51.33 MB
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Though often consigned to the footnotes of history, African American women are a significant part of the rich, multiethnic heritage of Texas and the United States. Until now, though, their story has frequently been fragmented and underappreciated. Black Women in Texas History draws together a multi-author narrative of the experiences and impact of black American women from the time of slavery until the recent past. Each chapter, written by an expert on the era, provides a readable survey and overview of the lives and roles of black Texas women during that period. Each provides careful documentation, which, along with the thorough bibliography compiled by the volume editors, will provide a starting point for others wanting to build on this important topic. The authors address significant questions about population demographics, employment patterns, family and social dimensions, legal and political rights, and individual accomplishments. They look not only at how African American women have been shaped by the larger culture but also at how these women have, in turn, affected the culture and history of Texas. This work situates African American women within the context of their times and offers a due appreciation and analysis of their lives and accomplishments. Black Women in Texas History is an important addition to history and sociology curriculums as well as black studies and women’s studies programs. It will provide for interested students, scholars, and general readers a comprehensive survey of the crucial role these women played in shaping the history of the Lone Star State.

A Guide To Hispanic Texas

Author: Helen Simons
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292777095
Size: 36.90 MB
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Hispanic culture is woven into all aspects of Texas life, from mission-style architecture to the highly popular Tex-Mex cuisine, from ranching and rodeo traditions to the Catholic religion. So common are these Hispanic influences, in fact, that they have been widely accepted as a part of everyone's heritage, comfortingly familiar and distinctively Texan. This new edition of Hispanic Texas contains all the guidebook entries of the original volume in a compact format perfect for taking along on trips throughout the state. Entries are arranged by region: San Antonio and South Texas Laredo and the Rio Grande Valley El Paso and Trans-Pecos Texas Austin and Central Texas Houston and Southeast Texas Dallas and North Texas Lubbock and the Plains Within each region, a city-by-city listing details the historic and modern sites and structures that bear Hispanic influence. Descriptions of local festivals and events, public art, museums, natural areas, and scenic drives enhance the entries, which are also profusely illustrated with historic and modern photographs and other illustrations.

Lone Star

Author: T. R. Fehrenbach
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 1497609704
Size: 57.28 MB
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The definitive account of the incomparable Lone Star state by the author of Fire & Blood: A History of Mexico. T. R. Fehrenbach is a native Texan, military historian and the author of several important books about the region, but none as significant as this work, arguably the best single volume about Texas ever published. His account of America's most turbulent state offers a view that only an insider could capture. From the native tribes who lived there to the Spanish and French soldiers who wrested the territory for themselves, then to the dramatic ascension of the republic of Texas and the saga of the Civil War years. Fehrenbach describes the changes that disturbed the state as it forged its unique character. Most compelling is the one quality that would remain forever unchanged through centuries of upheaval: the courage of the men and women who struggled to realize their dreams in The Lone Star State.

They Came From The Sky

Author: Stephen Harrigan
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9781477312940
Size: 45.87 MB
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In the fall of 2018, the University of Texas Press will publish the inaugural volume of the Texas Bookshelf, a major new history of Texas by Stephen Harrigan, the New York Times best-selling author. The Texas Bookshelf promises to be the most ambitious and comprehensive publishing endeavor about the culture and history of one state ever undertaken. Comprised of in-depth general-interest histories of a range of Texas subjects—politics, music, film, business, architecture, and sports, among many others—the Bookshelf volumes will be written by the state's brightest authors, scholars, and intellectuals, all affiliated with the University of Texas at Austin. Published in a signed edition, They Came from the Sky offers an exciting preview of Harrigan's sweeping, full-length history. This tantalizing "short" begins with the earliest native inhabitants over ten thousand years ago and continues through the ill-fated Spanish explorations of the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. In its pages, we encounter the prehistoric flint producers and traders who were Texas's first entrepreneurs; Spanish castaways and would-be conquerors; the Karankawas, Querechos (Apaches), and Caddos, whose lifeways were forever changed by contact with Europeans; and the "Lady in Blue," an abbess who mysteriously claimed to have visited the "Quivira and the Jumanas" in Texas while remaining within her Spanish cloister. Bringing Stephen Harrigan's formidable narrative talent to the founding story of Texas, They Came from the Sky constitutes the vanguard of a major publishing event.

Los Paisanos

Author: Oakah L. Jones
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806128856
Size: 62.55 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Little has been written about the colonists sent by Spanish authorities to settle the northern frontier of New Spain, to stake Spain’s claim and serve as a buffer against encroaching French explorers. "Los Paisanos," they were called - simple country people who lived by their own labor, isolated, threatened by hostile Indians, and restricted by law from seeking opportunity elsewhere. They built their homes, worked their fields, and became permanent residents - the forebears of United States citizens - as they developed their own society and culture, much of which survives today.