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Fanfares And Finesse

Author: Elisa Koehler
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 025301185X
Size: 37.33 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Unlike the violin, which has flourished largely unchanged for close to four centuries, the trumpet has endured numerous changes in design and social status from the battlefield to the bandstand and ultimately to the concert hall. This colorful past is reflected in the arsenal of instruments a classical trumpeter employs during a performance, sometimes using no fewer than five in different keys and configurations to accurately reproduce music from the past. With the rise in historically inspired performances comes the necessity for trumpeters to know more about their instrument's heritage, its repertoire, and different performance practices for old music on new and period-specific instruments. More than just a history of the trumpet, this essential reference book is a comprehensive guide for musicians who bring that musical history to life.

A Dictionary For The Modern Trumpet Player

Author: Elisa Koehler
Publisher: Scarecrow Press
ISBN: 0810886588
Size: 56.41 MB
Format: PDF
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Filled with concise and detailed definitions, A Dictionary for the Modern Trumpet Player includes biographies of prominent performers, teachers, instrument makers, and composers of trumpet solo and ensemble literature often omitted from other musical references.

A Timeline Of Trumpets

Author: Ron Berndt
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781979048804
Size: 64.89 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Trumpets have been a part of human culture since before there were humans. They have served as expressions of emotion, tools of the hunter-gatherer, tools of the warrior, and ultimately once again as a means of expressing that emotion from deep within the human soul that manifests as music. To look at how the trumpet has transformed in its role in human society is to look at how human society itself has transformed. And, as a material object once adapted from nature, but which took new forms as the successive technologies of metalworking, component sub-assembly fabrication, machining, high-force mechanical forming and ultimately automation transformed the abilities of humans to make objects for their use, it is a microcosm of human technological and socio-economic evolution.To collect and study examples of every form the trumpet has taken since the time when proto-human tools were limited to a choicely shaped rock up to the present day would be prohibitively expensive and practically impossible - as examples simply no longer exist. However, with cursory examination of the first 99% of said history, the evolution of the trumpet in modern times provides an excellent case study into how the forces of human cultural, religious, political, material and technological change interact with one another and manifest in a relatively simple and clearly defined element of our culture. Therefore, the bulk of what follows is focused on the piston valve trumpet and the time period during which chromatic trumpets rose to prominence in popular music, became ubiquitous in the schools following the advent of music education, and are now moving to a less prominent role once again as the popular genre moves into the age of electronic music.To that end, what follows is more a timeline of events and physical manifestations than a socio-cultural analysis - though the author has ventured to offer an opinion or ten along the way. The reader should feel free to question assertions made, and to treat this as an archeological data set as much as a history.

A Dictionary For The Modern Trumpet Player

Author: Elisa Koehler
Publisher: Scarecrow Press
ISBN: 0810886588
Size: 14.52 MB
Format: PDF
View: 468
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Filled with concise and detailed definitions, A Dictionary for the Modern Trumpet Player includes biographies of prominent performers, teachers, instrument makers, and composers of trumpet solo and ensemble literature often omitted from other musical references.

The Trumpet

Author: John Wallace
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300178166
Size: 39.63 MB
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Exploring the trumpet from prehistory to the twenty-first century, this first major book on the instrument in more than two decades is engagingly written by two leading performers and teachers of the trumpet and its family.

The Devil S Horn

Author: Michael Segell
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780312425579
Size: 18.33 MB
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The author charts the brief but colorful history of the saxophone, from its invention 160 years ago, through its subsequent role as a symbol of decadence and immorality, to its impact on music, particularly American jazz. Reprint. 15,000 first printing.

Imaginary Cities

Author: Darran Anderson
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022647030X
Size: 41.76 MB
Format: PDF
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How can we understand the infinite variety of cities? Darran Anderson seems to exhaust all possibilities in this work of creative nonfiction. Drawing inspiration from Marco Polo and Italo Calvino, Anderson shows that we have much to learn about ourselves by looking not only at the cities we have built, but also at the cities we have imagined. Anderson draws on literature (Gustav Meyrink, Franz Kafka, Jaroslav Hasek, and James Joyce), but he also looks at architectural writings and works by the likes of Bruno Taut and Walter Gropius, Medieval travel memoirs from the Middle East, mid-twentieth-century comic books, Star Trek, mythical lands such as Cockaigne, and the works of Claude Debussy. Anderson sees the visionary architecture dreamed up by architects, artists, philosophers, writers, and citizens as wedded to the egalitarian sense that cities are for everyone. He proves that we must not be locked into the structures that exclude ordinary citizens--that cities evolve and that we can have input. As he says: "If a city can be imagined into being, it can be re-imagined as well."

Smoketown

Author: Mark Whitaker
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1501122398
Size: 26.29 MB
Format: PDF
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“Smoketown brilliantly offers us a chance to see this other black renaissance and spend time with the many luminaries who sparked it…It’s thanks to such a gifted storyteller as Whitaker that this forgotten chapter of American history can finally be told in all its vibrancy and glory.”—The New York Times Book Review The other great Renaissance of black culture, influence, and glamour burst forth joyfully in what may seem an unlikely place—Pittsburgh, PA—from the 1920s through the 1950s. Today black Pittsburgh is known as the setting for August Wilson’s famed plays about noble but doomed working-class strivers. But this community once had an impact on American history that rivaled the far larger black worlds of Harlem and Chicago. It published the most widely read black newspaper in the country, urging black voters to switch from the Republican to the Democratic Party and then rallying black support for World War II. It fielded two of the greatest baseball teams of the Negro Leagues and introduced Jackie Robinson to the Brooklyn Dodgers. Pittsburgh was the childhood home of jazz pioneers Billy Strayhorn, Billy Eckstine, Earl Hines, Mary Lou Williams, and Erroll Garner; Hall of Fame slugger Josh Gibson—and August Wilson himself. Some of the most glittering figures of the era were changed forever by the time they spent in the city, from Joe Louis and Satchel Paige to Duke Ellington and Lena Horne. Mark Whitaker’s Smoketown is a captivating portrait of this unsung community and a vital addition to the story of black America. It depicts how ambitious Southern migrants were drawn to a steel-making city on a strategic river junction; how they were shaped by its schools and a spirit of commerce with roots in the Gilded Age; and how their world was eventually destroyed by industrial decline and urban renewal. Whitaker takes readers on a rousing, revelatory journey—and offers a timely reminder that Black History is not all bleak.