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Financing Medicaid

Author: Shanna Rose
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472051970
Size: 71.86 MB
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Medicaid has grown to be the largest intergovernmental grant program in the United States, thanks to the efforts of state governors

Medicare And Medicaid At 50

Author: Alan B. Cohen
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190231556
Size: 60.41 MB
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For fifty years, Medicare and Medicaid have stood at the center of a contentious debate surrounding American government, citizenship, and health care entitlement. In Medicare and Medicaid at 50, leading scholars in politics, government, economics, health policy, and history offer a comprehensive assessment of the evolution of these programs and their impact on society -- from their origins in the Great Society era to the current battles over the Affordable Care Act ("Obamacare"). These highly accessible essays examine Medicare and Medicaid from their origins as programs for the elderly and poor to their later role as a safety net for the middle class. Along the way, they have served as touchstones for heated debates about economics, social welfare, and the role of government. Medicare and Medicaid at 50 addresses key questions for understanding the past and future of health policy in America, including: ? What were the origins for these initiatives, and how were they transformed over time? ? What marks have Medicare and Medicaid left on society? ? In what ways have these programs produced innovation, even in eras of retrenchment? ? How did Medicaid, once regarded as a poor person's program, expand its benefits and coverage over the decades to become the platform for the ACA's future expansion? The volume's contributors go on to examine the powerful role of courts in these transformations, along with the shifting roles of Congress, public opinion, and state governors in the programs' ongoing evolution. From Lyndon Johnson to Barack Obama on the left, and from Ronald Reagan to George W. Bush on the right, American political leaders have tied their political fortunes to the fate of America's entitlement programs; Medicare and Medicaid at 50 helps explain why, and how those ongoing debates are likely to shape the future of the Affordable Care Act.

Trapped In America S Safety Net

Author: Andrea Louise Campbell
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022614058X
Size: 17.62 MB
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When Andrea Louise Campbell’s sister-in-law, Marcella Wagner, was run off the freeway by a hit-and-run driver, she was seven-and-a-half months pregnant. She survived—and, miraculously, the baby was born healthy. But that’s where the good news ends. Marcella was left paralyzed from the chest down. This accident was much more than just a physical and emotional tragedy. Like so many Americans—50 million, or one-sixth of the country’s population—neither Marcella nor her husband, Dave, who works for a small business, had health insurance. On the day of the accident, she was on her way to class for the nursing program through which she hoped to secure one of the few remaining jobs in the area with the promise of employer-provided insurance. Instead, the accident plunged the young family into the tangled web of means-tested social assistance. As a social policy scholar, Campbell thought she knew a lot about means-tested assistance programs. What she quickly learned was that missing from most government manuals and scholarly analyses was an understanding of how these programs actually affect the lives of the people who depend on them. Using Marcella and Dave’s situation as a case in point, she reveals their many shortcomings in Trapped in America’s Safety Net. Because American safety net programs are designed for the poor, Marcella and Dave first had to spend down their assets and drop their income to near-poverty level before qualifying for help. What’s more, to remain eligible, they will have to stay under these strictures for the rest of their lives, meaning they are barred from doing many of the things middle-class families are encouraged to do: Save for retirement. Develop an emergency fund. Take advantage of tax-free college savings. And, while Marcella and Dave’s story is tragic, the financial precariousness they endured even before the accident is all too common in America, where the prevalence of low-income work and unequal access to education have generated vast—and growing—economic inequality. The implementation of Obamacare has cut the number of uninsured and underinsured and reduced some of the disparities in coverage, but it continues to leave too many people open to tremendous risk. Behind the statistics and beyond the ideological battles are human beings whose lives are stunted by policies that purport to help them. In showing how and why this happens, Trapped in America’s Safety Net offers a way to change it.

Guide To U S Health And Health Care Policy

Author: Thomas R. Oliver
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 1483370453
Size: 80.41 MB
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Guide to U.S. Health and Health Care Policy provides the analytical connections showing students how issues and actions are translated into public policies and institutions for resolving or managing health care issues and crises, such as the recent attempt to reform the national health care system. The Guide highlights the decision-making cycle that requires the cooperation of government, business, and an informed citizenry in order to achieve a comprehensive approach to advancing the nation’s health care policies. Through 30 topical, operational, and relational essays, the book addresses the development of the U.S. health care system and policies, the federal agencies and public and private organizations that frame and administer those policies, and the challenges of balancing the nation’s health care needs with the rising costs of medical research, cost-effective treatment, and adequate health insurance. Key Features: The 30 topical essays investigate the fundamental political, social, economic, and procedural initiatives that drive health and health care policy decisions affecting Americans at the local, regional, and national levels Essential themes traced throughout the chapters include providing access to health care, national and international intervention, nutrition and health, human and financial resource allocation, freedom of religion versus public policy, discrimination and health care policy, universal health care coverage, private health care versus publicly funded health care, and the immediate and long-term costs associated with disease prevention, treatment, and health maintenance A Glossary of Key Health Care Policy Terms and Events, a selected Master Bibliography, and a thorough Index are included. This must-have reference for political science and public policy students who seek to understand the issues affecting health care policy in the U.S. is suitable for academic, public, high school, government, and professional libraries.

Health Policy Federalism And The American States

Author: Robert F. Rich
Publisher: Urban Inst Pr
ISBN:
Size: 30.53 MB
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As we begin the 21st century, health care policy remains a central part of the federalism debate. The rising cost of care, the growing recognition of the many millions of Americans who lack health insurance, and the innovation in state Medicaid programs in the 1980s with new ways of financing and delivering care give new urgency to the question of how to best divide public responsibilities between the federal government and the states. In this book, leading health policy scholars explore theories of intergovernmental relations that provide a useful framework for examining how to divide up the job of providing health care. They assess the capacity of the states to actually implement health care policy changes, and weigh the merits of alternative visions of the role of states and the federal government in health care policy.