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From Guilt To Shame

Author: Ruth Leys
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691143323
Size: 53.89 MB
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Why has shame recently displaced guilt as a dominant emotional reference in the West? After the Holocaust, survivors often reported feeling guilty for living when so many others had died, and in the 1960s psychoanalysts and psychiatrists in the United States helped make survivor guilt a defining feature of the "survivor syndrome." Yet the idea of survivor guilt has always caused trouble, largely because it appears to imply that, by unconsciously identifying with the perpetrator, victims psychically collude with power. In From Guilt to Shame, Ruth Leys has written the first genealogical-critical study of the vicissitudes of the concept of survivor guilt and the momentous but largely unrecognized significance of guilt's replacement by shame. Ultimately, Leys challenges the theoretical and empirical validity of the shame theory proposed by figures such as Silvan Tomkins, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, and Giorgio Agamben, demonstrating that while the notion of survivor guilt has depended on an intentionalist framework, shame theorists share a problematic commitment to interpreting the emotions, including shame, in antiintentionalist and materialist terms.

Shame And Guilt In Chaucer

Author: Anne McTaggart
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 0230337384
Size: 10.96 MB
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Geoffrey Chaucer aimed his ethical critique and social satire at human failures to acknowledge guilt and their self-defensive use of shame. Shame and Guilt in Chaucer explores Chaucer's representation of these concepts in the context of modern affect theory. By showing how shame pervades Chaucer's texts but guilt is largely invisible, inaccessible, or resistant to full disclosure, Anne McTaggart challenges perceptions and reveals an ethics of affect to be at the heart of Chaucerian poetics.

Reluctant Witnesses

Author: Arlene Stein
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199733589
Size: 73.12 MB
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For most of the postwar period, the destruction of European Jewry was not a salient part of American Jewish life, and was generally seen as irrelevant to non-Jewish Americans. Survivors and their families tended to keep to themselves, forming their own organizations, or they did their best to block out the past. Today, in contrast, the Holocaust is the subject of documentaries and Hollywood films, and is widely recognized as a universal moral touchstone. Reluctant Witnesses mixes memoir, history, and social analysis to tell the story of the rise of Holocaust consciousness in the United States from the perspective of survivors and their descendants. The public reckoning with the Holocaust, the book argues, was due to more than the passage of time. It took the coming of age of the "second generation" -- who reached adulthood during the rise of feminism, the ethnic revival, and therapeutic culture -- for survivors' families to reclaim their hidden histories. Inspired by the changed status of the victim in American society, the second generation coaxed their parents to share their losses with them, transforming private pains into public stories. Reluctant Witnesses documents how a group of people who had previously been unrecognized and misunderstood managed to find its voice. It tells this story in relation to the changing status of trauma and victimhood in American culture more generally. At a time when a sense of Holocaust fatigue seems to be setting in, and when the remaining survivors are at the end of their lives, it offers a reminder that the ability to speak openly about traumatic experiences had to be struggled for. By confronting traumatic memories and catastrophic histories, the book argues, we can make our world mean something beyond ourselves.

Speaking The Unspeakable In Postwar Germany

Author: Sonja Boos
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 080147194X
Size: 47.90 MB
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Speaking the Unspeakable in Postwar Germany is an interdisciplinary study of a diverse set of public speeches given by major literary and cultural figures in the 1950s and 1960s. Through close readings of canonical speeches by Hannah Arendt, Theodor W. Adorno, Ingeborg Bachmann, Martin Buber, Paul Celan, Uwe Johnson, Peter Szondi, and Peter Weiss, Sonja Boos demonstrates that these speakers both facilitated and subverted the construction of a public discourse about the Holocaust in postwar West Germany. The author's analysis of original audio recordings of the speech events (several of which will be available on a companion website) improves our understanding of the spoken, performative dimension of public speeches. While emphasizing the social constructedness of discourse, experience, and identity, Boos does not neglect the pragmatic conditions of aesthetic and intellectual production—most notably, the felt need to respond to the breach in tradition caused by the Holocaust. The book thereby illuminates the process by which a set of writers and intellectuals, instead of trying to mend what they perceived as a radical break in historical continuity or corroborating the myth of a "new beginning," searched for ways to make this historical rupture rhetorically and semantically discernible and literally audible.

Die B Cherdiebin

Author: Markus Zusak
Publisher: cbj Verlag
ISBN: 3894804270
Size: 39.18 MB
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Selbst der Tod hat ein Herz ... Molching bei München. Hans und Rosa Hubermann nehmen die kleine Liesel Meminger bei sich auf – für eine bescheidene Beihilfe, die ihnen die ersten Kriegsjahre kaum erträglicher macht. Für Liesel jedoch bricht eine Zeit voller Hoffnung, voll schieren Glücks an – in dem Augenblick, als sie zu stehlen beginnt. Anfangs ist es nur ein Buch, das im Schnee liegen geblieben ist. Dann eines, das sie aus dem Feuer rettet. Dann Äpfel, Kartoffeln und Zwiebeln. Das Herz von Rudi. Die Herzen von Hans und Rosa Hubermann. Das Herz von Max. Und das des Todes. Denn selbst der Tod hat ein Herz. „Die Bücherdiebin“ ist eine Liebesgeschichte, eine Hommage an Bücher und Worte und eine Erinnerung an die Macht der Sprache, die im Roman von Markus Zusak viele Facetten zeigt: den lakonisch-distanzierten Ton des Erzählers, Poesie und Zuversicht – und die reduzierte Sprache der Nazipropaganda.

Abbitte

Author: Ian McEwan
Publisher: Diogenes Verlag AG
ISBN: 3257600259
Size: 16.18 MB
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Die Abgründe und die Macht der Leidenschaft und der Phantasie: An einem heißen Tag im Sommer 1935 spielt die dreizehnjährige Briony Tallis Schicksal und verändert dadurch für immer das Leben dreier Menschen.

Ein Gl Ckskind

Author: Thomas Buergenthal
Publisher:
ISBN: 9783100096524
Size: 60.56 MB
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Bereits als kleines Kind erlebt Thomas Bürgenthal die Schrecken der Verfolgung. Sein Lebensweg führt ihn nach Auschwitz und Sachsenhausen. Nachdem er auch den äTodesmarschä überlebt hat, findet er nach der Befreiung in Amerika eine neue Heimat.