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My Life And An Era

Author: John Hope Franklin
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807167266
Size: 34.98 MB
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“My father’s life represented many layers of the human experience—freedman and Native American, farmer and rancher, rural educator and urban professional.”—John Hope Franklin Buck Colbert Franklin (1879–1960) led an extraordinary life; from his youth in what was then the Indian Territory to his practice of law in twentieth-century Tulsa, he was an observant witness to the changes in politics, law, daily existence, and race relations that transformed the wide-open Southwest. Fascinating in its depiction of an intelligent young man's coming of age in the days of the Land Rush and the closing of the frontier, My Life and an Era is equally important for its reporting of the triracial culture of early Oklahoma. Recalling his boyhood spent in the Chickasaw Nation, Franklin suggests that blacks fared better in Oklahoma in the days of the Indians than they did later with the white population. In addition to his insights about the social milieu, he offers youthful reminiscences of mustangs and mountain lions, of farming and ranch life, that might appear in a Western novel. After returning from college in Nashville and Atlanta, Franklin married a college classmate, studied law by mail, passed the bar, and struggled to build a practice in Springer and Ardmore in the first years of Oklahoma statehood. Eventually a successful attorney in Tulsa, he was an eyewitness to a number of important events in the Southwest, including the Tulsa race riot of 1921, which left more than 100 dead. His account clearly shows the growing racial tensions as more and more people moved into the state in the period leading up to World War II. Rounded out by an older man’s reflections on race, religion, culture, and law, My Life and an Era presents a true, firsthand account of a unique yet defining place and time in the nation's history, as told by an eloquent and impassioned writer.

Major Problems In African American History Loose Leaf Version

Author: Barbara Krauthamer
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1337516090
Size: 58.16 MB
Format: PDF
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Krauthamer and Williams' text introduces students to both primary sources and analytical essays and is designed to encourage critical thinking about the history and culture of African Americans. Updated to cover a wider geographic scope that includes the western United States and other parts of the Diaspora, as well as the newest scholarship in the field, the second edition presents a carefully selected group of readings organized to allow students to evaluate primary sources, test the interpretations of distinguished historians, and draw their own conclusions. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

The Militant South 1800 1861

Author: John Hope Franklin
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252070693
Size: 48.20 MB
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Identifies the factors and causes of the South's festering propensity for aggression that contributed to the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861. This title asserts that the South was dominated by militant white men who resorted to violence in the face of social, personal, or political conflict. It details the consequences of antebellum aggression.

The Color Line

Author: John Hope Franklin
Publisher: University of Missouri Press
ISBN: 9780826209641
Size: 20.64 MB
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Originating as three lectures delivered at the University of Missouri in April 1992, historian John Hope Franklin reflects on racism, the most persistent social problem in American history.