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Global Capitalism Its Fall And Rise In The Twentieth Century

Author: Jeffry A. Frieden
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393635775
Size: 75.41 MB
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"Magisterial history...one of the most comprehensive histories of modern capitalism yet written." —Michael Hirsh, New York Times Book Review In 1900 international trade reached unprecedented levels and the world's economies were more open to one another than ever before. Then as now, many people considered globalization to be inevitable and irreversible. Yet the entire edifice collapsed in a few months in 1914. Globalization is a choice, not a fact. It is a result of policy decisions and the politics that shape them. Jeffry A. Frieden's insightful history explores the golden age of globalization during the early years of the century, its swift collapse in the crises of 1914-45, the divisions of the Cold War world, and the turn again toward global integration at the end of the century. His history is full of character and event, as entertaining as it is enlightening.

Global Capitalism

Author: Jeffry A. Frieden
Publisher: W W Norton & Co Inc
ISBN:
Size: 39.78 MB
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A revealing history of the economic and political forces that have shaped the contemporary world argues that the spread of globalization has occurred as a direct result of political choices, tracing the collapse of globalization between 1914 and 1945 and the movement's revival at the end of the twentieth century. Reprint.

Global Capitalism

Author: Jeffry A. Frieden
Publisher: W. W. Norton
ISBN: 9780393058086
Size: 13.41 MB
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Contends that the spread of globalization has occurred as a direct result of political choices, tracing the collapse of globalization between 1914 and 1945 and the movement's revival at the end of the twentieth century.

Lost Decades

Author: Menzie D. Chinn
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393076504
Size: 28.94 MB
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Two economists explore the 2008 financial crisis, the events leading up to it and the potential long-term effects and describe what they believe will be the ongoing impact on debt and recovery in the United States. 13,000 first printing.

End Of The Line

Author: Barry C. Lynn
Publisher: Broadway Business
ISBN: 0767915879
Size: 25.73 MB
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Assesses the sweeping, frequently dangerous, impact of the global corporation for the nation, the citizen, the worker, and the economy, while looking at the tension between corporate needs and the interests of society and the repercussions of specific corporate decisions, including outsourcing, for American workers. Reprint. 12,500 first printing.

Globalization And History

Author: Kevin H. O'Rourke
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262650595
Size: 74.53 MB
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Winner in the category of Economics in the 1999 Professional/Scholarly Publishing Annual Awards Competition presented by the Association of American Publishers, Inc. Globalization is not a new phenomenon; nor is it irreversible. In Globalization and History, Kevin O'Rourke and Jeffrey Williamson present a coherent picture of trade, migration, and international capital flows in the Atlantic economy in the century prior to 1914—the first great globalization boom. The book's originality lies in its application of the tools of open-economy economics to this critical historical period—differentiating it from most previous work, which has been based on closed-economy or single-sector models. The authors also keep a close eye on globalization debates of the 1990s, using history to inform the present and vice versa. The book brings together research conducted by the authors over the past decade—work that has profoundly influenced how economic history is now written and that has found audiences in economics and history, as well as in the popular press. "Fans and foes of globalization usually agree on one thing: its inevitability. But that is a big mistake, as this fine piece of scholarship makes clear. . . . It is an exceptionally rigorous and insightful history of globalization. Its main message—that globalization can sow the seeds of its own destruction—is salutary. It should be required reading for anyone inclined to think that economic history is bunk." —The Economist

Capitalist Diversity On Europe S Periphery

Author: Dorothee Bohle
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801465222
Size: 59.15 MB
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With the collapse of the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance in 1991, the Eastern European nations of the former socialist bloc had to figure out their newly capitalist future. Capitalism, they found, was not a single set of political-economic relations. Rather, they each had to decide what sort of capitalist nation to become. In Capitalist Diversity on Europe's Periphery, Dorothee Bohle and Béla Geskovits trace the form that capitalism took in each country, the assets and liabilities left behind by socialism, the transformational strategies embraced by political and technocratic elites, and the influence of transnational actors and institutions. They also evaluate the impact of three regional shocks: the recession of the early 1990s, the rolling global financial crisis that started in July 1997, and the political shocks that attended EU enlargement in 2004. Bohle and Greskovits show that the postsocialist states have established three basic variants of capitalist political economy: neoliberal, embedded neoliberal, and neocorporatist. The Baltic states followed a neoliberal prescription: low controls on capital, open markets, reduced provisions for social welfare. The larger states of central and eastern Europe (Poland, Hungary, and the Czech and Slovak republics) have used foreign investment to stimulate export industries but retained social welfare regimes and substantial government power to enforce industrial policy. Slovenia has proved to be an outlier, successfully mixing competitive industries and neocorporatist social inclusion. Bohle and Greskovits also describe the political contention over such arrangements in Romania, Bulgaria, and Croatia. A highly original and theoretically sophisticated typology of capitalism in postsocialist Europe, this book is unique in the breadth and depth of its conceptually coherent and empirically rich comparative analysis.

Global Capital And National Governments

Author: Layna Mosley
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521521628
Size: 57.99 MB
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This text suggests that international financial integration does not mean the end of social democratic welfare policies. As evidence for its conclusions, it draws on interviews with fund managers, quantitative analyses and archival investment banking materials.

The Making Of Global Capitalism

Author: Leo Panitch
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 1844677427
Size: 21.28 MB
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Groundbreaking account of the development of capitalism. The all-encompassing embrace of world capitalism at the beginning of the twenty-first century was generally attributed to the superiority of competitive markets. Globalization had appeared to be the natural outcome of this unstoppable process. But today, with global markets roiling and increasingly reliant on state intervention to stay afloat, it has become clear that markets and states aren’t straightforwardly opposing forces. In this groundbreaking work, Leo Panitch and Sam Gindin demonstrate the intimate relationship between modern capitalism and the American state, including its role as an “informal empire” promoting free trade and capital movements. Through a powerful historical survey, they show how the US has superintended the restructuring of other states in favor of competitive markets and coordinated the management of increasingly frequent financial crises. The Making of Global Capitalism, through its highly original analysis of the first great economic crisis of the twenty-first century, identifies the centrality of the social conflicts that occur within states rather than between them. These emerging fault lines hold out the possibility of new political movements transforming nation states and transcending global markets.

Casino Capitalism

Author: Susan Strange
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 1784996599
Size: 13.12 MB
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Originally released by Basil Blackwell in 1986, and then re-released by Manchester University Press in 1998, Casino capitalism is a cutting-edge discussion of international financial markets, the way they behave and the power they wield. It examines money's power for good as well as its terrible disruptive, destructive power for evil. Money is seen as being far too important to leave to bankers and economists to do with as they think best. The raison d'?tre of Casino Capitalism is to expose the development of a financial system that has increasingly escaped the calming influences of democratic control. This new edition includes a powerful new introduction provided by Matthew Watson that puts the book it in its proper historical context, as well as identifying its relevance for the modern world. It will have a wide reaching audience, appealing both to academics and students of economics and globalization as well as the general reader with interests in capitalism and economic history.