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Grieving Beyond Gender

Author: Kenneth J. Doka
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135844283
Size: 62.87 MB
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Grieving Beyond Gender: Understanding the Ways Men and Women Mourn is a revision of Men Don’t Cry, Women Do: Transcending Gender Stereotypes of Grief. In this work, Doka and Martin elaborate on their conceptual model of "styles or patterns of grieving" – a model that has generated both research and acceptance since the publication of the first edition in 1999. In that book, as well as in this revision, Doka and Martin explore the different ways that individuals grieve, noting that gender is only one factor that affects an individual’s style or pattern of grief. The book differentiates intuitive grievers, where the pattern is more affective, from instrumental grievers, who grieve in a more cognitive and behavioral way, while noting other patterns that might be more blended or dissonant. The model is firmly grounded in social science theory and research. A particular strength of the work is the emphasis placed on the clinical implications of the model on the ways that different types of grievers might best be supported through individual counseling or group support.

Techniques Of Grief Therapy

Author: Robert A. Neimeyer
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415807255
Size: 74.40 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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"Techniques of Grief Therapy is an indispensable guidebook to the most inventive and inspirational interventions in grief and bereavement counseling and therapy. Individually, each technique emphasizes creativity and practicality. As a whole, they capture the richness of practices in the field and the innovative approaches that clinicians in diverse settings have developed, in some cases over decades, to effectively address the needs of the bereaved. New professionals and seasoned clinicians will find dozens of ideas that are ready to implement and are packed with useful features, including:An intuitive, thematic organization that makes it easy to find the right technique for a particular situation Expert guidance on implementing each technique and tips on avoiding common pitfalls Sample worksheets and activities for use in session and as homework assignments Illustrative case studies and transcripts"--

Bereavement Care For Families

Author: David W. Kissane
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136192832
Size: 30.21 MB
Format: PDF
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Grief is a family affair. When a loved one dies, the distress reverberates throughout the immediate and extended family. Family therapy has long attended to issues of loss and grief, yet not as the dominant therapeutic paradigm. Bereavement Care for Families changes that: it is a practical resource for the clinician, one that draws upon the evidence supporting family approaches to bereavement care and also provides clinically oriented, strategic guidance on how to incorporate family approaches into other models. Subsequent chapters set forth a detailed, research-based therapeutic model that clinicians can use to facilitate therapy, engage the ambivalent, deal with uncertainty, manage family conflict, develop realistic goals, and more. Any clinician sensitive to the roles family members play in bereavement care need look no further than this groundbreaking text.

Men Don T Cry Women Do

Author: Kenneth J. Doka
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131771461X
Size: 68.88 MB
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Do men and women grieve differently? This text, while emphasizing that there are many ways to cope with grief, offers a refreshing change from the popular gender stereotypes of grief. Two patterns of grieving are described: an intuitive pattern where individuals experience and express grief in an affective way (stereotyped as female); and an instrumental pattern where grief is expressed physically or cognitively (stereotyped as male). A third pattern representing a blending of these two is also introduced. Of critical importance is that such patterns are related to, but not determined by, gender; and each has distinct strengths and weaknesses. Organized into three main parts, this topical new text begins by defining terms, introducing and delineating the grief patterns, and rooting the book's concept in contemporary theories of grief. The second part speculates on factors that may influence individuals' patterns of coping with loss (e.g., personality, gender, culture, etc.). The final part considers implications and therapeutic interventions likely to be effective with different types of grievers.

Treating Traumatic Bereavement

Author: Laurie Anne Pearlman
Publisher: Guilford Publications
ISBN: 1462515517
Size: 70.79 MB
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This book presents an integrated treatment approach for those struggling to adapt after the sudden, traumatic death of a loved one. The authors weave together evidence-based clinical strategies grounded in cutting-edge knowledge about both trauma and grief. The book offers a clear framework and many practical tools for building survivors' psychological and interpersonal resources, processing their trauma, and facilitating mourning. In a large-size format with lay-flat binding for easy photocopying, the book includes over 30 reproducible handouts. Purchasers can access a companion website to download and print these materials as well as supplemental handouts and a sample 25-session treatment plan. Winner (Second Place)--American Journal of Nursing Book of the Year Award, Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing Category

Grief And Bereavement In The Adult Palliative Care Setting

Author: E. Alessandra Strada
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199768927
Size: 16.61 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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For patients and family caregivers the journey through illness and transitions of care is characterized by a series of progressive physical and emotional losses. Grief reactions represent the natural response to those losses. Grief is defined by a constellation of physical, cognitive, emotional and spiritual manifestations, varying in length and severity. While grief reactions are common and expected responses to loss, they have the potential to cause significant suffering. And, while grief is not a disease, it can develop into a pathological process warranting specialized treatment. Additionally, some aspects of grief overlap with the symptoms of clinical depression and anxiety, making diagnosis difficult. Grief and Bereavement in the Adult Palliative Care Setting provides practical, evidence-based, and clinically effective approaches to understanding the multifaceted nature of grief and bereavement in patients with advanced illness and their caregivers. This handbook is an ideal tool for palliative care providers of various disciplines who provide direct clinical services to patients and family members. It assists clinicians in recognizing and identifying grief reactions as unique expressions of patients and caregivers' history and psychological functioning. Primary care physicians who provide care to patients and families will also find this practical assessment and treatment guide helpful. They will learn how to best support bereaved patients and caregivers when grief is uncomplicated, and when to choose more active interventions that may include appropriate referrals to mental health professionals.

Principles And Practice Of Grief Counseling

Author: Howard R. Winokuer, PhD
Publisher: Springer Publishing Company
ISBN: 0826108733
Size: 37.35 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"The book is well-written, interesting, informative, thorough, and useful! As an educator for 43 years, this is the sort of text that I would be pleased to use in my classroom!....I would highly recommend this book! It is an important contribution to the field!"--Gerry R. Cox, PhD, in Illness, Crisis and Loss This core, introductory textbook for undergraduate and graduate level courses is the first volume to combine the knowledge and skills of counseling psychology with current theory and research in grief and bereavement. It is grounded in the belief that grief counseling is distinct from other therapeutic issues because grief is an adaptive response rather than a form of pathology. The book describes the unique aspects of grief as a normal response to loss, and views the goal of counseling bereaved individuals as one of facilitating the unfolding of the healthy and adaptive aspects of the process as it manifests itself within each client. Grief is considered a response to losses that are both death- and non-death-related; and psychological, physical, social, economical and practical experiences of grief are addressed. The text introduces various theories of bereavement and examines different therapeutic modalities that can be used in the context of grief and loss. Specific counseling practices that facilitate successful interventions are discussed, particularly that of "presence," considered by the authors to be the primary therapeutic stance when working with bereaved individuals. The text also addresses grief counseling with special populations, ethical issues, and self-care concerns for counselors. Case studies, discussion and reflection questions, and suggested additional resources are included in each chapter. Key Features: Regards grief therapy as a unique form of counseling based on grief as an adaptive response rather than as a form of pathology Combines the knowledge and skills of counseling psychology with current research in grief and bereavement Written by a prominent clinician and an educator with over 60 years of combined experience in grief counseling Focuses on the importance of "presence" as the most important therapeutic foundation for working with bereaved individuals

Death Dying Life Living

Author: Charles A. Corr
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1337563897
Size: 35.36 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Practical and inspiring, DEATH & DYING, LIFE & LIVING, 8th Edition helps students learn how to navigate encounters with death, dying, and bereavement. The authors integrate classical and contemporary material, present task-based approaches for individual and family coping, and include four chapters devoted to death-related issues faced by children, adolescents, young and middle-aged adults, and older adults. They also discuss a variety of cultural and religious perspectives that affect people's understanding and practices associated with such encounters. Practical guidelines for constructive communication encourage productive living in the face of death. You can use this book as a primary textbook for undergraduate and graduate courses in death, dying, and bereavement; as a supplementary text in related courses; or as a general resource. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Devastating Losses

Author: Carol E. Jordan, MS
Publisher: Springer Publishing Company
ISBN: 0826107478
Size: 70.96 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book fills a critical gap in our scientific understanding of the grief response of parents who have lost a child to traumatic death and the psychotherapeutic strategies that best facilitate healing. It is based on the results of the largest study ever conducted of parents surviving a child's traumatic death or suicide. The book was conceived by William and Beverly Feigelman following their own devastating loss of a son, and written from the perspective of their experiences as both suicide-survivor support group participants and facilitators. It intertwines data, insight, and critical learning gathered from research with the voices of the 575 survivors who participated in the study. The text emphasizes the sociological underpinnings of survivors' grief and provides data that vividly documents their critical need for emotional support. It explains how bereavement difficulties can be exacerbated by stigmatization, and by the failure of significant others to provide expected support. Also explored in depth are the ways in which couples adapt to the traumatic loss of a child and how this can bring them closer or render their relationship irreparable. Findings suggest that with time and peer support affiliations, most traumatically bereaved parents ultimately demonstrate resilience and find meaningful new roles for themselves, helping the newly bereaved or engaging in other humanitarian acts. Key Features: Offers researchers, clinicians, and parent-survivors current information on how parents adapt initially and over time after the traumatic loss of a child Presents data culled from the largest survey ever conducted (575 individuals) of parents surviving a child's suicide or other traumatic death Investigates the ways in which stigmatization complicates and prolongs the grieving process Addresses the tremendous value of support groups in the healing process Explores how married couples are affected by the traumatic loss of their child

Disenfranchised Grief

Author: Kenneth J. Doka
Publisher: Research PressPub
ISBN: 9780878224272
Size: 49.29 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book focuses on the kind of grief that is not openly acknowledged, socially validated, or publicly mourned. It addresses the unique psychological, biological, and sociological issues involved in disenfranchised grief. The contributing authors explore the concept of disenfranchised grief, help define and explain this type of grief, and offer clinical interventions to help grievers express their hidden sorrow.