Download gypsies and the british imagination 1807 1930 in pdf or read gypsies and the british imagination 1807 1930 in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get gypsies and the british imagination 1807 1930 in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Gypsies And The British Imagination 1807 1930

Author: Deborah Epstein Nord
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231510330
Size: 32.23 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 2387
Download and Read
Gypsies and the British Imagination, 1807-1930, is the first book to explore fully the British obsession with Gypsies throughout the nineteenth century and into the twentieth. Deborah Epstein Nord traces various representations of Gypsies in the works of such well-known British authors John Clare, Walter Scott, William Wordsworth, George Eliot, Arthur Conan Doyle, and D. H. Lawrence. Nord also exhumes lesser-known literary, ethnographic, and historical texts, exploring the fascinating histories of nomadic writer George Borrow, the Gypsy Lore Society, Dora Yates, and other rarely examined figures and institutions. Gypsies were both idealized and reviled by Victorian and early-twentieth-century Britons. Associated with primitive desires, lawlessness, cunning, and sexual excess, Gypsies were also objects of antiquarian, literary, and anthropological interest. As Nord demonstrates, British writers and artists drew on Gypsy characters and plots to redefine and reconstruct cultural and racial difference, national and personal identity, and the individual's relationship to social and sexual orthodoxies. Gypsies were long associated with pastoral conventions and, in the nineteenth century, came to stand in for the ancient British past. Using myths of switched babies, Gypsy kidnappings, and the Gypsies' murky origins, authors projected onto Gypsies their own desires to escape convention and their anxieties about the ambiguities of identity. The literary representations that Nord examines have their roots in the interplay between the notion of Gypsies as a separate, often despised race and the psychic or aesthetic desire to dissolve the boundary between English and Gypsy worlds. By the beginning of the twentieth century, she argues, romantic identification with Gypsies had hardened into caricature-a phenomenon reflected in D. H. Lawrence's The Virgin and the Gipsy-and thoroughly obscured the reality of Gypsy life and history.

Gypsies

Author: David Cressy
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0191080527
Size: 41.88 MB
Format: PDF
View: 3144
Download and Read
Gypsies, Egyptians, Romanies, and -more recently-Travellers. Who are this marginal and mysterious people who first arrived in England in early Tudor times? Are tales of their distant origins on the Indian subcontinent true, or just another of the many myths and stories that have accreted around them over time? In fact, can they even be regarded as a single people or ethnicity at all, or are they little more than a useful concept? Gypsies have frequently been vilified, and not much less frequently romanticized, by the settled population over the centuries, but social historian David Cressy now attempts to disentangle the myth from the reality of Gypsy life over more than half a millennium of English history. In this, the first comprehensive historical study of the doings and dealings of Gypsies in England, from their first appearance in early Tudor times to the present, he draws on original archival research, and a wide range of reading, to trace the many moments when Gypsy lives became entangled with those of villagers and townsfolk, religious and secular authorities, and social and moral reformers. Crucially, it is a story not just of the Gypsy community and its peculiarities, but also of England's treatment of that community, from draconian Elizabethan statutes, through various degrees of toleration and fascination, right up to the tabloid newspaper campaigns against Gypsy and Traveller encampments of more recent years.

Hospitality And The Transatlantic Imagination 1815 1835

Author: Cynthia Schoolar Williams
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137340053
Size: 75.30 MB
Format: PDF
View: 2372
Download and Read
Hospitality and the Transatlantic Imagination, 1815-1835 argues that a select group of late-Romantic English and American writers disrupted national tropes by reclaiming their countries' shared historical identification with hospitality. In doing so, they reimagined the spaces of encounter: the city, the coast of England, and the Atlantic itself.

In Search Of The True Gypsy

Author: Wim Willems
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780714646886
Size: 40.66 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 3459
Download and Read
It has only been recognised tardily and with reluctance that during the Second World War hundreds of thousands of itinerants met the same horrendous fate as Jews and other victims of Nazism. Gypsies appear to appeal to the imagination simply as social outcasts and scapegoats or, in a flattering but no more illuminating light, as romantic outsiders. In this study, contemporary notions about Gypsies are traced back as far as possible to their roots, in an attempt to lay bare why stigmatisation of gypsies, or rather groups labelled as such, has continuned from the distant past even to today.

Representations Of The Gypsy In The Romantic Period

Author: Sarah Houghton-Walker
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198719477
Size: 47.45 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 7494
Download and Read
In the Romantic period, a range of social, cultural, and political changes and events coalesce in such a way as to produce a sudden and significant amount of pressure on general ideas of what a gypsy might be, and thus on representations of gypsies in literature and art. Because of the very particular situation in which Romantic-period gypsies find themselves, for approximately fifty years the figure of the gypsy becomes a peculiarly effective means through whichanxieties about these changes and events might be articulated. This book examines the way in which writers and artists from the Romantic period depict gypsies, showing how various aspects of thecontemporary context influence those depictions, and highlighting the opportunities offered by the figure of the gypsy for the exploration of a range of hopes and fears.

The Gypsies

Author: Charles G. Leland
Publisher: BiblioBazaar, LLC
ISBN: 9780554298283
Size: 64.53 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 4556
Download and Read
This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

Giving Women

Author: Jill Rappoport
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190208589
Size: 31.59 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 3424
Download and Read
Altruism and self-assertiveness went hand in hand for Victorian women. During a period when most lacked property rights and professional opportunities, gift transactions allowed them to enter into economic negotiations of power as volatile and potentially profitable as those within the market systems that so frequently excluded or exploited them. They made presents of holiday books and homemade jams, transformed inheritances into intimate or aggressive bequests, and, in both prose and practice, offered up their own bodies in sacrifice. Far more than selfless acts of charity or sure signs of their suitability for marriage, such gifts radically reconstructed women's personal relationships and public activism in the nineteenth century. Giving Women examines the literary expression and cultural consequences of English women's giving from the 1820s to the First World War. Attending to the dynamic action and reaction of gift exchange in fiction and poetry by Charlotte Bront?, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Christina Rossetti as well as in literary annuals, Salvation Army periodicals, and political pamphlets, Rappoport demonstrates how female authors and fictional protagonists alike mobilized networks outside of marriage and the market. Through giving, women redefined the primary allegiances of their everyday lives, forged public coalitions, and advanced campaigns for abolition, slum reform, eugenics, and suffrage.

The Life Of George Eliot

Author: Nancy Henry
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118274679
Size: 69.55 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 3270
Download and Read
The life story of the Victorian novelist George Eliot is as dramatic and complex as her best plots. This new assessment of her life and work combines recent biographical research with penetrating literary criticism, resulting in revealing new interpretations of her literary work. A fresh look at George Eliot's captivating life story Includes original new analysis of her writing Deploys the latest biographical research Combines literary criticism with biographical narrative to offer a rounded perspective

At Home In The World

Author: Maria DiBattista
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400884772
Size: 26.22 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 2639
Download and Read
In a bold and sweeping reevaluation of the past two centuries of women's writing, At Home in the World argues that this body of work has been defined less by domestic concerns than by an active engagement with the most pressing issues of public life: from class and religious divisions, slavery, warfare, and labor unrest to democracy, tyranny, globalism, and the clash of cultures. In this new literary history, Maria DiBattista and Deborah Epstein Nord contend that even the most seemingly traditional works by British, American, and other English-language women writers redefine the domestic sphere in ways that incorporate the concerns of public life, allowing characters and authors alike to forge new, emancipatory narratives. The book explores works by a wide range of writers, including canonical figures such as Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, Harriet Jacobs, Edith Wharton, Virginia Woolf, Willa Cather, Gertrude Stein, and Toni Morrison; neglected or marginalized writers like Mary Antin, Tess Slesinger, and Martha Gellhorn; and recent and contemporary figures, including Nadine Gordimer, Anita Desai, Edwidge Danticat, and Jhumpa Lahiri. DiBattista and Nord show how these writers dramatize tensions between home and the wider world through recurrent themes of sailing forth, escape, exploration, dissent, and emigration. Throughout, the book uncovers the undervalued public concerns of women writers who ventured into ever-wider geographical, cultural, and political territories, forging new definitions of what it means to create a home in the world. The result is an enlightening reinterpretation of women's writing from the early nineteenth century to the present day.