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History Of Infectious Disease Pandemics In Urban Societies

Author: Mark D. Hardt
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739180274
Size: 44.30 MB
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This book examines the evolution of urban social patterns and infectious diseases. Tracing the historical record, it explores the human struggle to contain infectious disease and the adaption of microbes to these measures.

Pandemics Science And Policy

Author: S. Abeysinghe
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137467207
Size: 44.26 MB
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Pandemics, Science and Policy analyses the World Health Organisation's (WHO) management of the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic. Abeysinghe illustrates the ways in which the WHO's account was vulnerable to contestation, and ultimately how uncertain risks can affect policy and action on the global level.

The Spanish Influenza Pandemic Of 1918 1919

Author: Maria Porras-Gallo
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
ISBN: 1580464963
Size: 49.56 MB
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Sheds new light on what the WHO described as "the single most devastating infectious disease outbreak ever recorded," focusing on social control, gender, class, religion, national identity, and military medicine's reactions to the pandemic.

Epidemics In Modern Asia

Author: Robert Peckham
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107084687
Size: 32.98 MB
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The first history of epidemics in modern Asia. Robert Peckham considers the varieties of responses that epidemics have elicited - from India to China and the Russian Far East - and examines the processes that have helped to produce and diffuse disease across the region.

Britain And The 1918 19 Influenza Pandemic

Author: Niall Johnson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134215010
Size: 13.31 MB
Format: PDF
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Between August 1918 and March 1919 a flu pandemic spread across the globe and in just under a year 40 million people had died from the virus worldwide. This is the first book to provide a total history and seriously analyze the British experiences during that time. The book provides the most up-to-date tally of the pandemic’s impact, including the vast mortality, as well as questioning the apparent origins of the pandemic. A ‘total’ history, this book ranges from the spread of the 1918–1919 pandemic, to the basic biology of influenza, and how epidemics and pandemics are possible, to consider the demographic, social, economic and political impacts of such a massive pandemic, including the cultural dimensions of naming, blame, metaphors, memory, the media, art and literature. An inter-disciplinary study, it stretches from history and geography through to medicine in order to convey the full magnitude of the first global medical ‘disaster’ of the twentieth century, and looks ahead to possible pandemics of the future. Niall Johnson brings an impressive scholarly eye on this fascinating and highly relevant topic making this essential reading for historians and those with an interest in British and medical history.

Research On Schools Neighborhoods And Communities

Author: William F. Tate
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442204680
Size: 11.49 MB
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This volume focuses on research and theoretical developments related to the role of geography in education, human development, and health. Multiple disciplinary perspectives provide the strengths and problems in our communities. Research in this presidential volume provides historical, moral, and scientifically based arguments to inform understandings of civic problems and possible solutions.

The Aids Pandemic

Author: Kenneth H. Mayer
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 9780080475806
Size: 24.70 MB
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The AIDS Pandemic explores the ways in which HIV/AIDS has, and continues to transform the wide range of related disciplines it touches. Novel perspectives are provided by a unique panel of internationally recognised experts who cover the unprecedented impact onf AIDS on culture, demographics and politics around the world, including how it affected the worlds' economy, health sciences, epidemiology and public health. This important far- reaching analysis uses the lessons learned from a wide array of disciplines to help us understand the current status and evolution of the pandemic, as it continues to evolve. * Unique and timely presentation of new theories and perspectives * Concentrates on the changes that have taken place in a broad array of related disciplines * Provides key contextual information, for those new to the field or at interface areas between disciplines * Includes an international focus on evolving African and Asian experiences * Focuses on the current strategies for developing vaccines and microbicides * Outlines harm reduction and prevention programs * Explores issues related to delivery of life-saving AIDS medications in resource-constrained environments

Disaster And Human History

Author: Benjamin Reilly
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786436557
Size: 48.43 MB
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"This book examines the relationship between mankind and the natural environment through the lens of natural disasters, where the interaction between humanity and its environment comes into sharpest focus. The text achieves this goal through the examinati

An Unnatural History Of Emerging Infections

Author: Ron Barrett
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191507156
Size: 22.28 MB
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This book traces the social and environmental determinants of human infectious diseases from the Neolithic to the present day. Despite recent high profile discoveries of new pathogens, the major determinants of these emerging infections are ancient and recurring. These include changing modes of subsistence, shifting populations, environmental disruptions, and social inequalities. The recent labeling of the term "re-emerging infections" reflects a re-emergence, not so much of the diseases themselves, but rather a re-emerging awareness in affluent societies of long-standing problems that were previously ignored. An Unnatural History of Emerging Infections illustrates these recurring problems and determinants through an examination of three major epidemiological transitions. The First Transition occurred with the Agricultural Revolution beginning 10,000 years ago, bringing a rise in acute infections as the main cause of human mortality. The Second Transition first began with the Industrial Revolution; it saw a decline in infectious disease mortality and an increase in chronic diseases among wealthier nations, but less so in poorer societies. These culminated in today's "worst of both worlds syndrome" in which globalization has combined with the challenges of the First and Second Transitions to produce a Third Transition, characterized by a confluence of acute and chronic disease patterns within a single global disease ecology. This accessible text is suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate level students and researchers in the fields of epidemiology, disease ecology, anthropology, health sciences, and the history of medicine. It will also be of relevance and use to undergraduate students interested in the history and social dynamics of infectious diseases.